Will Riding Too Fast Break MTB Parts? | GMBN Tech

Will Riding Too Fast Break MTB Parts? | GMBN Tech


(bell chimes) – This is ask GMBN Tech, our weekly show, where we get to talk about
mountain bike tech related stuff. So, if you guys got any questions, or anything you wanna
know, fire your questions in to the email address
on the screen there, or you can add yours in the
comments below this video. So, first up is from Daniel. “After watching Neils video
over on GMBN the other day, about how fast you can
go on a mountain bike, it got me thinking. Are
hubs made with a safe maximum speed in mind? Just how fast can your average hub go
for a continuous time?” To be honest, I’m not actually sure and I’m pretty sure max bike hubs don’t really have that as a factor in them, because they’re designed
to cope with the stresses of mountain bike riding as opposed to the speed and the friction
and what would happen if you go to high speed like the same sort of testing you might see used in cars. I honestly can’t see speed being that much of a problem in max
bikes, cause it’s pretty rare anyone’s gonna be getting over that speed that Neil did. And even then his bike coped
with it like it was nothing. It was just a walk in the
park really for that bike. So really, if you look at
the structure of a hub, you’ve basically got the shell, you’ve got the cassette mechanism, you’ve got the forebearings,
normally four bearings in there and the axle running though it. So really one of the only
things that could go wrong would be the bearings
collapse and that would only happen if your bearings are in
bad condition to start with. And even if they did collapse,
the axle’s still going to continue rotating around on the inside. I mean granted, your bearings
are gonna disintegrate, so it’s not gonna be in
a nice state of affairs in the inside, but really there’s not a lot to go wrong with the hub. The bigger things that
can go wrong with the hub would be the hub shell cracking itself, but it wouldn’t happen for speed. That’s why a lot of these
happen from something like slope style or maybe some
of the way that Blake rides quite aggressively
or something in relation to the torque that goes
through the drive mechanism. So, I think you’re pretty safe on max with the sort of speed
you’re gonna be doing, but we’ll ask a few
manufacturers out there just to see if there is a stance on how that they do their testing. I know some brands are quite open, but then other brands just don’t wanna reveal how they do their testing. But I’ll come back to you,
maybe on a weekly show, when I’ve heard back from a few brands. Alright, next up is from Jack Ammo Man, “Ask GMBN Tech, I wanna go tubeless but my current tires which
are non-tubeless ready still have 90% tread life left on them. Could I still run tubeless with these? I don’t really wanna spend
to much and buy new tires”. Yeah, absolutely! As long as your tires are
in pretty good condition, you can set them on
tubeless whenever you want. Just pay attention and
make sure there aren’t any sort of slices or slashes
that you haven’t noticed, because you could be running an inner tube in there and not actually notice that. But when you set up
tubeless the first time you might lose quite a lot of sealant until it plugs that hole
and if it’s a big slash, it might not ever actually plug it. So, just make sure the
inside of that caucus is nice and easy to set
up and you’re good to go. I’m just gonna throw
you to a video, in fact, let’s get a little clip
on screen of how to setup your tires tubeless, nice
good video to follow. The link to that is gonna be in the description below this video. Getting one half of the tire onto the rim and then you wanna be putting some sealant into tire before you
finish putting the tire onto the wheel completely. Make sure your sealant
is really well shaken up so the particles are
suspended within the fluid. And then pour in the amount that you need for your size tire and
then spin that round and then start getting the rest of the tire bent back in place. Next up is from Joseph Stalin “Not sure if you still own it, but how is your nukeproof scout race? I’m thinking of picking one up myself.”. Yeah, it’s a great bike. To be honest, it’s been neglected lately, because I’ve just simply haven’t had enough time riding a bike. The only biking I’ve recently
I’ve been riding the Scout quite a lot and my other nukeproof, but not the Scout too much. I do need to start giving
it a bit more love. But no, it’s a really good bike. So it’s obviously available in two setups, the 27 and a 1/2 or the 29. I’ve got a 29 inch wheel version, which is a little bit
heavy just cause the wheels are a bit more on the budget end, so they’re quite heavy
when they’re in 29 inch, but they’re really, really strong. The only thing, I’ve just been
a little bit frustrated with, I’ve not managed to get the
fork exactly the way I like it. I did toy around with
making some sort of plastic air volume spacers cause they don’t accept the new ones you can get from RoxShox for more expensive forks. So, I haven’t been able to
get the fork quite right but considering the price
I think the bike’s really, really good and the
geometry is pretty on it. Great, great bike to start with and really good bike to sort of upgrade and grow with as you own it as well, because the frame is
great, geometry is bang on. Next up’s from MTB/ST “Hi
Doddy, I’ve gotta 2018 Canyon Spectral AL 6 which
has got a pike RC fork in it, I was thinking, is it worth
it to upgrading to the RCT3? I do quite a bit of racing
and I wanna do more, I’m also an advanced rider and tackle double blacks frequently. Cheers.”. Well, my answer to you would be like, do you feel like it’s a problem
with the RC damper on there. So the RC damper is a really basic one. It’s a dial but it can
be a lot more or less locked out, free open and
somewhere in the middle, where it’s quite hard
to get an exact setting because it’s got like an
infinite sort of dial there. Where as the RCT3 has got high
and low speed compression, adjustable independently, so it’s a different kinda fish altogether. Now, it’s a much more advanced damper and it is a lot better to be fair. However, there’s nothing
wrong with that RC, I think they work really
well and sometimes the simplicity of them is great. I had that on both of my
previous nukeproof 29ers and no problem whatsoever with it. Something I did find
with it though myself, was I found it spiked a
bit if you had too much damping on it. What that
means is basically, the fork, you feel the sharp sort of
impact through the fork, where the damper can’t
actually react to that in time so you get part of that shock, through to you. So, I would say the RC is great, it works, but if you’re noticing
it feels a bit limited, you might wanna upgrade to the RCT3. But there is another
option and that’s just to get your fork as it is, get it tuned, and that way you can
get it to feel exactly the way you want, with all
the support that you need. There’s a lot of
suspension chambers around. There’s the guys at FoxUK
for fox related forks, there’s TF Tuned, there’s
Sprung in the Forest of Dean, there’s loads in Europe and
US and all over the place. And most guys can really get the best type of fork to suit you, so
it’s definitely worth looking at that option to. A Creek related one… from The Timkatt, “Help! My seat rails are noisy. What’s the best way to silence it?”. Alright, so, Tim there’s a few different things this could be. So, firstly, you need to look
at the C-clamp interface. Sometimes you get a single
bolt that goes through, you have these little plates that go on the outside to hold the set of rails. You have ones that’ve
got a twin bolt design that have a crater underneath and a clamp on the top that clamps down. Check all of the bolts,
make sure they’re clean, make sure they’re greased. Check the clamps, as
well all the surfaces, check anything there and make sure you’ve timed everything to the
correct torque setting, which will be written on those bolts or on the clamps themselves. Definitely check that
because they do creak and it’s really easy for that to happen if you’ve been riding
your bike for a long time. Especially if there was any grease that’s been washed away, and
they’re sort of a bit dry. That sort of thing can
happen, so check that. Also there are actually rails itself, have been known to
creak within the clamps, when the clamp clamps on. So you can use an assembly compound there, because that’s really good
once you’ve set your position. It’s not a moving part, so actually, an assembly compound
helps a bit of adhesion. It helps it not move, so that’s
another cause of creaking. And the last one and if it’s this one, then I feel sorry for
you, cause this can be really annoying, is where the saddle rails sort of penetrate the base of the seat and actually hold it into place. Now if they can move
around at all, in any way, they’re gonna creak. Now there’s a few things
you can do to stop this. I mean the obvious one is
to make sure it’s clean, to see if there is any movement and use a bit of lubricant
like some spray lube, WD40, something like that might help. I’ve heard of people
doing that one before. And I have heard of people actually trying to fill that sort of void, so there can’t be any movement in there. I’ve heard of people
screwing in those silicone bathroom sealant and all sorts of stuff. But, if I was you, I would just
try the lube version first. And also check that it’s
not actually damaged cause I’ve had it before when one’s been loose on an old bike of mine and actually you can pull the whole top of the saddle straight off the rails and that’s why it was creaking. If that’s the case, time
for a new saddle, mate. Alright, next up is from DilutedUK, Doddy, loving the show. I’ve
got a Voodoo Hardtail 29er, which says on the frame and website that it’s designed by
motorbike legend Joe Murray. I’m fairly new to the sport
and know nothing about him, so could you maybe give me
a brief history lesson?”. Yeah, Joe Murray is a absolute legend. Actually I went on a ride
with Joe Murray in Mohave a few years back now and
for VooDoo press camp. And that was really cool
getting to ride with him because, well, as you say, he is a legend. So, Joe Murray was in mountain biking from the very beginning. He was a very, very good cross
country racer to start with. And I think in the early
days, as early as Ace 182, he was only riding for Gary Fischer, as one of his team riders doing a lot of development work and use
to basically win everything. I’m pretty sure he was a
NORBA champion like twice, that’s a North America, sort of like, their national championship basically. He won that twice, the cup
champs and the overall, as far as I know. And he also did something crazy, he won like 12 races back to back. Like the high-level cross country, which I’m fairly sure no
one’s even matched today, by this date. You know we’ve got
people like Nieto Shorty, whose just mind-blowingly good, but not sure if he’s done that, 12 back to back like that. Anyway, so, Joe went on after Fischer, to work for a lot of
bike companies out there. So, one of those was Marin
or Marin, as you might know. Now here she was right at the beginning, we started a company with Bob Buckley, and he actually speced all the bikes and designed a whole
number of those bikes, including the first or arguably the first titanium production mountain bike, which was the Marin Team Titanium. Now when that came out
that was just incredible because it was such a futuristic metal for mountain bikes to use. Bear into mind that everything
back then was steel, so to have this wonder material, that had that inherent flex cause it was super light and it wouldn’t corrode. It was pretty mind blowing. But at the time, I
think, the price was like two and half, maybe $2,800 and it came out and it shocked the industry
cause no one had seen a bike even half that cost at
the time, so pretty mental. And after Marin, he went on to Kona and of course he did all the Kona series of bikes there, famous
sloping top tube on them, and aggressive head angles. He designed their Project
2 and Track 2 forks. The Track 2 had like a proper crown, bolted crown start system on there. He designed all their maximum reaction and velocity and equilibrium tires, which were frontal risk specific tires, bigger tire up front,
bit more float on it, bit more aggression for
cornering and braking. The tire out backwards, had
bit more of a pedal profile for that forwards or propulsion. There’s a whole bunch of
stuff he designed with them just to amazing really,
a lot of innovation. Now, he went on to VooDoo after that and he started a whole bunch
of other stuff in the middle. Now, he’s one of the industry’s leading sort of product testers, so
behind the scenes he tests. He’ll sign loads of NDAs,
non-disclosure agreements, basically so, he tests
for other manufacturers. And one of the things he’s been doing, like from the beginning, he’s been one of Shimano product testers. Joe’s work doing the
Shimano product testing was literally riding
all these new products before they came, long
before they would go to market, basically to see how they wear, see what the economics are like, see what it’s like in day to day life. Now the American side of
that business was known, I think the Americans call
that, skunk development, and I think they took
that name from Lockheed, he used to have the Skunk Works program for the SR-71 Blackbird. Just a couple of little bit
of trivia for you there. I would 100% say he is a absolute legend. And just so you know how
much of a legend his is, he was inducted into the
Hall of Fame in 1988, and in that year he was inducted in to it along side him was Gary
Fischer, Charlie Kelly, and Joe Breeze, basically
the three founding fathers of mountian biking. There was also Charlie
Cunningham, Tom Ritchey, he used to make all those early fissures, Jacquie Phelan and Mike Sinyard. Mike Sinyard, to you and
me, he’s Mr. Speacialized. So, that just shows you how
much of a legend Joe Murray is. Okay, last but not least,
here from Houman HN, “Loving all the GMBN
shows, especially the Tech, I’ve learned loads from
you. I built up a Freeride 26 inch wheel bike with a 65
and 1/2 degree head angle” Nice. “currently it’s got a
rockshox boxxer downhill fork with a 42 mil offset. I
wanted to change the fork to a 27 and 1/2 inch wheel
pike, roxshox pike that is, with 160 mil. Would it break
the headset if it goes on. I intend to ride hard”, you said your “the bike, basically
pedals like a XC bike, and I use it like a all-all rounder but it’s really heavy
without a fork on it. So should I go for 42 mil
offset 27 and 1/2 fork instead of a dual crown 26, will it be as strong and should I do it?”. First thing to ask, why the 27 and a 1/2? I’m guessing you just think
that it might not be 26. I’m fairly sure there are some 26s still, in that spec, but if you just rather go for the 27 and a
1/2, yeah, that would be absolutely fine, but it’s
a really modernized fork, so I don’t think you’re
gonna have any issues with breakages or anything like that. But just so you know
this, a twin crown fork is always going to be stronger
because there’s more support. There’s more overlap on
the inner and outer legs. The inner legs are a lot
longer and they’re supported by twin sets of crowns on there. It’s just a much stronger
and more overbuilt fork. But glad you point out it’s really heavy, so it’s not gonna do
your bike too much good. But yeah, you could
definitely put the same offset 27 and a 1/2 on
there, maxmize on that, and 160 mil travel always
gonna feel amazing as well. Brand new fork, now that
compared to an older boxer. Boxers are great, don’t get me wrong, but the new fork tank we see these days is just so, so good out the box. There we go, that’s another Ask
GMBN Tech clinic in the bag. For a couple more great
videos click down here for the first in our essential series. It’s sort of about going back to basics. And click down here if you need
five reasons to go tubeless. Also tells you a lot about why tubeless is so good and how you need to put it on your bike. Keep those questions coming in. Get them in to the comments. Get them in to the email address on the screen at the
beginning of the show there. And as always click on the round globe to subscribe to GMBNTech. We love having you here. If you like GMBNTech, give us a thumbs up!