Will Modern Road Bike Wheels Fit A Retro Bike Frame? | GCN Tech Clinic

Will Modern Road Bike Wheels Fit A Retro Bike Frame? | GCN Tech Clinic


(whoosh) – Welcome back to another episode of the GCN Tech Clinic, where your problems I try to solve. So if you’ve got one, leave it for me down there in the Comments section below. Right, I’m going to crack on. First question this week
comes in from Carlos Martins, who says, “Jon, I’m having
trouble removing my rear wheel. “Now I recently installed
Ultegra R8050 Di2 on my bike, “and since then my chain does not go down “to the 11 tooth cog,
which makes it difficult “to remove the rear wheel. “Is there a way to setup Di2 “so that it drops to the 11 tooth cog?” Yeah, Carlos, there is,
not a problem at all. What you are going to need to do, is go into the E-Tube software, which links up to your derailleurs, and you’re going to need
to reprogram the ratios that you’ve got fitted onto your bike, and also remove the synchroshift, because what happens then, is if you’re in the
small ring for instance, which it sounds like you are, where it won’t go down in the 11 tooth, is once you start clicking away, getting into a bigger gear, the front derailleur is
told from the rear one, this isn’t the optimal chain line, so it moves the chain onto the big ring, won’t let you go into that 11. The other thing you could do, is not mess around with any
of these ratios whatsoever in the E-Tube software, and when you want to
take out your rear wheel, put the bike into the big ring, and then it should go down
to that 11 tooth sprocket. If it’s not going down into there, then it makes me think that
your gear limit screws, they need adjusting slightly. But something really that
actually is sort of prevalent, if you like, in all of these
new Di2 rear derailleurs, or actually in all of the
Shadow style rear derailleurs from Shimano, is that
there’s an increased tension in that rear mech, which
means that getting out wheels isn’t quite as easy as it was before. But the easiest thing to do really, is just tilt back the rear mech slightly, just give the wheel a little
tap, and out it comes. Next up is Gareth Chaplin. Now Gareth says, “Jon, I’ve just started “to upgrade an old Emmelle Alpine Sports “five speed road bike,
probably about 30 years old.” Probably is, yeah. “I want to move away “from the awful stem
headset mounted shifters, “and have modern STI ones, “and upgrade the freewheel too. “I was hoping to squeeze in a 10 speed, “and upgrade to 105 throughout. “I’ve got 127 millimeters of space “between the rear dropouts. “What would you say is
the biggest size freewheel “I could fit in, along
with matching shifters? “Many thanks in advance, Gareth.” Right Gareth. I reckon right you’ll be able to put 130 mill hub in there, so that’s, oh, eight, nine, 10, 11 speed. The reason being, you got 127 now, 130, that’s just 1.5 mill extra per side, so little bit of that, just that action really with the rear end, you should be able to get it in there, but if in doubt, do consult
a local frame builder. There will be people right
now in the Comments section, saying do not advise
this, do not advise this. I’ve done it, I know Doddy does it, so it is absolutely fine. Just make sure though, that you have got some cable stops on the downtube of that bike. From memory, I mean I know exactly what you’re talking about. The gear levers that
are mounted on the stem, they’re a real dangerous
looking bit of kit. I can’t remember exactly
what the cables do, if they have some stops on the downtube, but if not, you can get a little clamp, which adjusts and adapts onto it. I think it’s something
like Problem Solvers, or something like that, they make one, but yeah that sounds
like a big old rebuild you got going on there. Next up is Jonas Buurgard. Now Jonas has got a pretty
similar question, I guess, to the previous one, but
I’m going to answer it, because well why not? Right. Now Jonas has got an old
road bike from the early 90s, with a complete Shimano
500ex Exage groupset. He’s got downtube shifters, and a seven speed hyperglide cassette. Is it possible to replace
the existing groupset to a groupset with a nine speed cassette, and gear levers on the handlebars? If so, what do I recommend? Right, okay, so your
frame with seven speed is going to be 126 mill
spaced at the rear dropouts. For nine, 10, 11, even
eight, you need 130 mill, so you may well be able to get it to fit in there okay, and just like I said on the previous question, it might need to be cold set
by a local frame builder, something like that, so, it’s just something to consider there. You can also get little adapters. I presume that your gear levers at the moment are brazed on, so they just simple screw on to the two little like lugs if you like, or little mounting brackets
that go on that downtube. You then get some
replacements to go in there, and that’s where your
cables get housed into. Now, something to consider here, is that nine speed isn’t
necessarily that easy to get ahold of anymore. Yeah, there is loads of
it still kicking around, but it’s gradually, I
suppose, being phased out, so something to consider there, would be 10 speed, or
even 11 speed groupset. The reason being, there are so many deals to be had out there, believe me, that quite often it’ll be even cheaper than what the nine speed
components would be. But, I am just looking forward to this. Oh, don’t forget as well, your rear hub. That needs to be able to
accommodate those sprockets too. Those seven speed ones, pretty
sure the freehubs on them, they just don’t work with anything other than the seven speed, just because of the width of it. Now we got Latechniker, who says, “I bought a fatbike to ride on the beach “during my holidays. “The chain started
rusting after a few weeks, “even though I cleaned it after every ride “with fresh water, dried it, “and GT7 spray that apparently gets rid “of moisture as well. “After a few months,
also my normal bike chain “and components started rusting, “so I figure that it is
not riding on the beach, “or in water, but the seaside air “that gets to the bike during the months “when it’s not being used. “What can I do about it, basically? “Both bikes are already
kept in a closed garage. “I’ve removed the chain
and submerged it in oil, “or is there something more I can do “when I’m not riding it? “Or is it just a matter
of buying a new chain “every year or so?” Well what you could do, and this is going to open a can of worms, is to wax the chain. Provide a nice coating
there so it won’t get rusty, but in seriousness, what I would do, I would just coat it whenever you can, and just wipe it down. Sadly, salt when you live near the sea, is so, so present. I used to live 50 meters
from the Atlantic Ocean, and you wouldn’t believe the salty mess that I used to have to deal with. It was absolutely disgusting. So yeah, I would just simply try and add on things like
WD-40, anything like that, and also give the chain
a backpedal as well, to try and work it inside of it. A little bit of surface
rust every now and then, that doesn’t really matter so much. Just try and keep on top of it. So get yourself a Brillo pad. So that’s something which you would clean a really bad pot or pan, where you burnt all your food, so something like that, that’s enough, it’s just abrasive
enough, just to take off that top layer, but yeah, certainly add on any sort of water displace, like WD-40, or the GT7
spray that you mentioned, but dipping it in oil, well that’s just going to add… And basically, all the
sand and everything, that’s just going to stick to it. It’s not ideal, no. Now we’ve got Carey Lyman Lopez. “Hey Jon, a friend of mine offered me “an Ultegra 6700 groupset
without the brakes “for a very good (steal) of a price, “however it has a 6600 crankset. “I currently have a Sora 3500 gears, “with a FSA Gossamer crankset, “with outboard bottom bracket bearings. “I like the FSA cranks better, “and I believe it’s much
newer than the Ultegra one. “Should I give the Ultegra cranksets a go, “or should I stick to my FSA?” If you like it, stick with it. Honestly, that’s the only
advice I’m going to give. I’m not going to try and talk you around, but if the groupset is
that much of a bargain, then buy it, get that chainset, sell it on, and then put that
money aware somewhere safe, so maybe you can spend it
on an upgrade in the future. Honesty is the best policy. Now we’ve got Steven van Egmond. Now Steven says, “I have
an old 80s Peugeot Ventoux, “my pride and joy, and
I’m not in the position “to buy expensive parts or a new bike. “Whilst cleaning it, I
discovered I do not actually “have a black cassette,
nor a black chainring. “What’s the best way to really get them “as clean as possible? “Thank you.” Right Steven, get yourself
a nailbrush, some hot water. Probably an old toothbrush as well, and a really good degreaser. So, there are some out there that they promise the world, and they’re probably worth
spending the extra money on, rather than getting something quite weak. Don’t use anything like dish soap, or car shampoo, anything like that. You really want something
that’s going to attack it, because it sounds to me like you’ve got a lot of grime on there. Brake cleaner, disc brake cleaner, or motorbike brake
cleaner, car brake cleaner, anything like that,
inside of an aerosol can, that works wonders too. Because of the compressed
air, when you spray it, it really does blast it out, and it dries pretty quickly too. I know people who use petrol and diesel. They’re not the most
environmentally friendly products, and also not the best for your health too, but they work absolute wonders. Again, I’m just giving you
absolute honest advice here. There is also another
product called Jizer, and it’s from the Swarfega brand, so some people out there
will remember Swarfega, it’s the green slimy stuff
you rub on oily hands, and it just disappears. They actually make sort of
five liter, I think it is, big old containers of it. Pour that into a pot, and
you could brush that on. Those would be my go-to options really, for absolutely filthy components. Good luck with it, mate. And a final question this week comes in from Nathan Vishwanathan, who says, “Hi Jon, I am planning to
upgrade my old Trek 1000 SL, “to the new R7000 105 groupset. “Which other parts will
I also have to upgrade? “Whole wheels or just the rear hub? “Thanks.” Right. Just the rear hub on this
one, I’m pretty sure. But, let’s consider though. Before changing out a rear hub, sometimes it could actually be cheaper to buy a complete wheel, because if you just change the hub, you’re going to need spokes, labor, and well also the hub as well, whereas a rear wheel, you can get some absolute deals out there to be had, so even on pairs of wheels. Also consider this, the front derailleur, quite often when you buy a bundle, you only get a braze-on front derailleur, so unless you got a braze-on one now, you may need to get a
front derailleur clamp, that it just clamps onto the down, onto the seat tube, sorry, and then the braze-on one goes in there. But, before you do any of this, make sure you take some pictures, so you can submit it to screw riding up grades, buy upgrades. Right, there we go,
another one done and dusted here in the Tech Clinic. Let me know if you’ve got a problem, down there in the Comments section below. Or, even all forms of social media, using the hashtag #ASKGCNTECH. Remember as well,
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