What Training Should I Do After An Injury Or Time Off? | Ask GCN Anything

What Training Should I Do After An Injury Or Time Off? | Ask GCN Anything


(Electrical zapping) – Welcome back to ask GCNything. – Yes, and this week
we’ve got a pint show. We’ve got questions on
how much kits the pros get and do they get to keep their own bikes. Also should you upgrade your training bike and should you get a power
meter or a smart trainer? – Hm. Tough choice that one. Plenty of other questions as well. To put your questions in for next week, leave them in the comments
section down below. Use the hastag TORQUEBACK on social media. Uh, or for your chance to win
three months free subscription to zwift, from our mates over at zwift, use the hashtag ASKGCNTRAINING and get your training
related questions in. – Now we’ve got a question
from Andy Rodwell. Why don’t the pros have their names printed on the backs of their jersey’s making identification that bit easier for the viewing fans? Oh, I’d have to agree with you, That (mumbles)
– Well because it’s cycling and we don’t want to make
life easy for anybody. – No – Even inside the sport do it. Uh, some teams actually do have the names on their jersey’s, don’t they? Uh, but not all. Would make things a lot easier, as you rightly pointed out. But, why not different colored
helmet covers, for example. Like, the Japanese Keiba racing or horse racing. – Yeah, I have said that it would make life so much
easier, that, wouldn’t it? And especially of the
commentators point of view, the viewers point of view. On everyone really. But, there have been some teams that have had to play around. And Sky of some point had their nicknames or names down here, and then they’ve had that on the sleeve. Iam Cycling had it on
their backs at some point. – Two bigs isn’t they? They ended up having a bit of a wrangle with the UCI over the
size of the lettering and had to take change
it to something else. Typical UCI isn’t it? – Yep, yep. – Um, talking of Sky actually, uh, it’s going a little bit off track, – Yeah, go for it. – But, one of our uh, personnel went over to the gyro, and was having a word with one of the physios from teams, but came back here, and says, apparently Chris
Froomes got knee problems? I was like, really? I haven’t heard that. (laughs) – Wha- who told you that? And he said, Henry. And I said, Never heard of him. Yeah, Henry Lloyd is what
it said on his jacket. So, yeah anyway. – So mixing up sponsor names and rider names, ooo! A little bit difficult, that. – Yeah, what was his
name? BMC, I don’t know. Uh, anyway, I went back to UCI antiquated rules. They have had some weird ones over the years haven’t they?
– yeah, they have. – And they always have their training. – Yeah, we’ve got tennings armfuls of some weird rules, coming
up in this next video. One of them, believe it or not, is that you’re not allowed
to have a non-level saddle. – No. – Yeah, alright, check
the rest of the video out. – [Voiceover] According to UCI, an excessively slopping saddle can improve sporting
performance of the rider, to an unacceptable degree, and has to be limited. So, whip out those spirit levels over. Inadvertently, UCI may have irradicated an entire future generation of pros. With the current riders
suffering numb-nuts every time they ride a time trial. (electric zapping) Benolt Gauthier, you are this weeks winner of three months free
subscription to Zwift. Uh, he writes here and says “Loving the show. I’m slowly recovering from a hip fracture and will end up using Zwift
to build power back again.” Using it for free actually. For the first three months, at least. “What type of training
progression do you recommend over four to six months when coming back from a major injury?” – Right, that first off
sound like a horrific injury. – It does, yeah. – So, sorry to hear about that. And good luck with your recovery. First thing you need to
do is listen to your body and your physician. Patience is really key in recovering. – Yeah, definitely. Yeah, and you’re doing the right thing by starting out indoors. That’s the best thing for rehabilitation. From a few pointers, really. Uh, firstly, you don’t have
any of those distractions that you get on the road. So, the risk of crashing is minimal. Although, some people
still do seem to manage it, while they’re training, don’t they? Uh, secondly, it’s much easier
to get on and off the bike. You’re not going to over extend your hip and cause any damage,
from that point of view. Uh, but also it means that
you can end you session as soon as you feel that
theres any discomfort there. Rather than being 20 minutes down the road and having to plod back. – Yeah, that would be
a bit of a nightmare. But it is really difficult
to prescribe a session because, well, we don’t know where you are on your injury, um. But, we have got some,
a few things in metrics that you can do to help
you do that really. – And, the simplest metrics
really, aren’t they? So, you’ve start with duration. So, when you first get back on the bike, what you want to do is time
how long you can ride for before you experience some discomfort, at which point you, of course, stop. Might be 15 minutes or so, and note that down. That can be your bench mark. Uh, and you can then set
a weekly goals after that. Now, it might be that in week two you’re still only able to
do 15 minutes at a time. So, you can also look at the
frequency of your riding. Maybe in week one you
do two or three rides. And over the course of that first month, you can build up to four
or five rides per week. Even if it’s just 15 minutes at a time. – Yeah, and when you’re
doing that training make sure you’re writing
down a few things. Like, your cadence. Your cadence is really key when
getting back from an injury. So, note down what your
cadence is when you start, and then keep noting as
you start to progress. And, hopefully you’re
cadence will get better. – Yeah, and when you are back up to doing around about an hour or so at close to the cadence that
you had before your injury, then you can start to do things that are a little bit more specific. You definitely though, don’t
want to be doing anything that requires high torque. Any sprints or power cadence
work is a bit of a no-no. Because you, again, might
make your injury worse. – Yeah, so, when you’re
starting to feel back to normal then you can look at
doing some specific stuff. Make sure you keep that nice and short, And then you can add some tempo. – Yeah, and then tempo, even when you’ve been
doing that for as well, you want to make sure that you can ride for a good hour or so at tempo without any discomfort. Before you’re then pretty
much back to normal, you can start doing very
high intensity efforts, and even sprints if you want to. It is a long process, I’m afraid. You do have to be patient,
as we said at the start and listen to your body. – Yes, and also when
you’re not on the bike, you can also help your recovery
by doing stuff off the bike. And, that is, some strength
work and some balancing or some stretching. And that will really
help your progression, and your recovery. – We’ve just been rehearsing this. And it’s a really really
long, quick fire round. – Really long. – Isn’t it? Uh, first up this from James Griffiths. Myself and a group from work
are doing a charity ride Lands End to John O-Groats in nine days, and we’re not season cyclists
only do six or seven miles to and from work and have
never ridden road bikes before signing up to this. Uh, we have started upping the miles but what is the best way to train for the 110 miles a day
on road and Zwift options. – Well, first off, congrats on signing up. That’s the hardest bit actually, is just pin-pointing
– is not. (laughs) – Yeah, is pin-pointing a
challenge and then doing it. But, congrats on that. And, then training, so what I would do is I would look at your schedule, and then, the key is to
string some rides together. So, I would personally look at the weekend as your free spaces. And try and get some four to five to may, you know, four to five hour a days and then string those together. Even get on out on a group ride or on a Saturday or Sunday. And, uh, and yeah, do it that way. And then make sure you taper down going into the main event. – It’s the back to back rides that are really essential, isn’t it? – And of course, the taper at the end. You can always try extending that commute six or seven miles, into, let’s say 20 or 25 once or twice a week. On your way home, for example. Uh, next up from Murst G0C. Is there a significant benefit to having a high end training bike? I do understand that every
gain counts while racing, but would it make any difference
to replace my heavier, less aero training bike with a better, thus more expensive one? Uh, I’m sure you would love
to get a better training bike. We all would, wouldn’t we? But, is it gonna help you? I don’t think so, really. It just kind of depends on
what type of riding you do. If you ride solo all the time, you’re still gonna get exactly
the same training effect, by doing the same power. You’d just be going a little bit slower, so it makes no difference
to how much fitter you get. On the other hand, if you
do a lot of group riding, the heavier training bike is actually gonna make things
harder for you to keep up. Therefore, you’re doing more power. You might get a positive
training effect from that so it could be better for you. – Yeah, could be. Um, who doesn’t love a winter hack bike? That you can go out in any weather. Wind, rain, snow. Yeah, whatever weather and you can just not worry about it. Go out, smash it, put mud guards on it. – Yeah, I mean, we’re
fortunate, aren’t we? We do get bikes lent to us. We don’t, we have to give them back. (laughs) – We get bikes lent to us and so, well, we’re in
a fortunate position. But, if I was buying bikes, I would definitely have a winter hack. I didn’t care about as much. – I would to. I’m with you on that. – I-I’d have like record on it, instead of super record probably. (laughs) Anyway, next questions
is from Noah Kepner. How much kit and gear do
pro cyclists get to keep from their teams and sponsors? I see customs paint jobs for National Champions
and World Champions. Do they get to keep those bikes? – Good question. – Uh, Do they have to pay for them if they want to keep them? – Mmm, that’s a really good question, but the pros get a lot of kits. A lot of clothing, um, wha- and a lot of, lots of
different things, really. But the one thing they don’t get to keep is their bike. And that’s rather annoying, yeah? – It is really annoying, isn’t it? – I never got to keep mine. – I always thought I was
going to get to keep my bike. The only ones I’ve ever got to keep are the ones that the team
forgot about, basically. – Oh. – Don’t tell them. – Yeah, which ones have you got? – Uh, I’m not telling you either. (laughs) – Some of the bigger name riders, apparently have it written
into their contract, that they do get to keep their bikes at the end of the year. Dan Martin, apparently,
being an example of that. Usually he’s got quite the collection. – Yes, when I saw him in Jerona, He has a bike from every
team he’s ridden for. So that, that’s quite something really. – I think you need to be a big name rider to have something like that
in your contract, don’t ya? But if we’d gone to them and
said “I want to keep my bike,” and yeah, stick that in my contract, they would have said,
“well, stick it where the sun don’t shine.” – And the funny thing is,
also, before we crack on, is that, Nigel Mansell actually
had written in his contract that he got to keep his cars. So, there you have it. Some of the top profiles, um uh, atheletes do get to keep some big stuff. – Name dropper. – Uh, George Clarke. “I’m looking to invest
in an indoor trainer and I’m unsure whether
to get a smart trainer or a standard turbo trainer and then purchase a separate power meter. I’ve heard that power meter readings are more accurate with
a crank base power meter and I could then still
be recording my data when I’m outside on my bike.” – That’s a really hard question to answer. Um, I personally would have
to go with a power meter. Just because I enjoy being outside and being able to yeah, use my power indoors and outdoors. But, nowadays, the erg mode and the smart trainers, do make Zwifting really come to life. And I’m, well, I had a chance
to race on it last night. – You’re a convert aren’t you? – Yeah, and it really was amazing to to how realistic it was. And how racing is and how the training um uh, how the training
sessions really work so. – Smart trainers just make
it a lot more interesting when you’re riding
something like the Zwift. And they increase the
resistance when you’re climbing vice-versa when you’re going down a hill. And like James said, erg mode
is a great training tool. So that hasn’t really
helped him very much. Sorry about that George.
– Sorry George. – If I had to say power
meter or smart trainer, like you, I’d say power meter. – Yeah. – Because, I spend a lot
more time riding outdoors than I do indoors. And I like to collect the data everywhere. – Yeah, I agree. But, if you ask Olly Bridgewood, he would tell you a smart trainer. – Would he? Well I think that our
viewers should listen to us on this occasion, not Olly. (laughs) – Okay, Neil Simpson. “I got an adventure bike for commuting but I want to have fun with it. How can I figure out
uh, routes where to go? With the road bike, I can use road maps. Thanks and keep up the good work.” – Yes, and there are
loads of different tools that you can use for this. You could use, strava heat map. Um, which is really popular. And this basically, lights up the roads that are really used by cyclists, so, for example, a bike
path would be really lit up. So, if you, feeling adventurous, then, go to where’s not lit
up and rather dull lights. Um, uh. – Make sure that’s not lit up,
because it’s not a highway. – Yeah. – But, now that could be an
adventurous way to do it. – Yeah, a dull, and there’s
another w-ways, isn’t there? – Well, you could also use uh, apps like Commute or ride with GPS to create your own route. Because, they will
highlight, not just roads, but bridle ways and bike
paths, et cetera too. But normally the best
way to find the best road is to ask local riders, isn’t it? So ask them at a local bike shop, or a local cycling cafe. And even better than that, get to go out riding with them. – Yeah.
– And they’ll show you. – Make some new friends. That’s ideal isn’t it? – Yeah, right, finally
on this slow fire round, it’s this from Lewis Waugh
– ah, slow fire (laughs) – Uh, “just got my first proper bike fit for my road bike, which got
me wondering when I need a fit for my commuter. I commute everyday on
a commuter city bike. Which has a more upright position. I’m not having an pain while commuting, but would it make me
faster and more efficient?” You would be fast and more efficient on your other bike, wouldn’t you? What I would suggest is that you just try to
transfer the measurements that you’ve got from your bike fit over onto your commuter bike. You might be able to get it exact. But the most important part
is your saddle position, in terms of it’s height and
also the lay back as well. So, you get that dialed in and actually, you should be absolutely
fine on your city bike. – Yeah, and I would
totally agree with Dan, but it also depends on
what your commutes like. So, if you really do want to go fast, you want to use it as training, then just use your road bike. But, if you do just want to chill out and enjoy your commute then go for the less. – Exactly, yeah. If you get a solo height position right you’re unlikely to get
any kind of injuries. – No, exactly. Got another question from Robert Repka. “Hey, I started riding in a group and what I found was most problematic is getting back to the
end of the pace line after doing your on the front. What is the best way of doing
it without getting dropped, and also without constantly
looking backwards to check where the end of the train is. – Hmm, uh, you’re not
on your own here Robert. That is a horrific
thing having to get back onto the pace run when
you’ve just done your turn. Doesn’t matter if you’ve
just started cycling or if you’re a fully fledged pro, does it? Uh, so the key here then is
not to go too far into the red, Whilst you’re on the front. You want to leave a little bit in reserve, so that when you pull off and you go back to the
back of the pace line, you got enough power left in the tank to be able to accelerate
and get back onto the group, at which point you will have
a bit longer to recover. – Yes, and in terms of knowing when the last person is coming up, you basically want to have a good idea of what size of the group it is. Once you know that, then when you’re coming, when you peel off after your ride and you’re
going to the back of the group, you can then sense when
that rider is coming past. Then, have a quick look
over your shoulder, depending on what side the group is, and then get back on the power before you get behind that last rider, and that will put you up
the same speed as the group. And then you can slot in, nicely. And not lose too much of a gap, and you will have to kick back on. – Mm, that’s the idea, isn’t it? That you just got back up to
the same speed of the group. Just as your front wheel is behind the last rider’s rear wheel.
– Exactly. – And then you would have to
close the gap as James said. Uh, we’ve got a lot of tips
for you coming up, Robert, in quite an old video. That is youthful looking Dan Lloyd there. Uh, it looks like 10 years ago. Actually, only five or six, maybe. Uh, anyway, a few tips that
shows to be relevant now. Although incidentally, James
has recently shot a new one, on this very subject
over and out of Bedear. So make sure we check
that out very soon indeed. – [James] 15 to 20 seconds is generally a good amount of time
to spend in the front before you swing up. However, if you’re feeling
strong go for longer. Don’t go harder, and vice-versa. If you’re not feeling
too good on the bike, swing off quite soon after
you’ve done your turn. – I’m afraid it’s time for the ceremonious closing of the laptop. – It’s the end of this weeks episode. – Yes, and thank you for watching. And if you have enjoyed it, then, don’t forget to give up a thumbs up. And if you want your question
to be answered on next week, then use the hashtag torqueback. And if you want the chance of getting three months free
subscription from Zwift, then use the hashtag GCNtraining. – Hmm, got an ask at the start there. – [Both] Ask GCN training. – I always forget that. – Yeah, you do, don’t you. Well, I’m not doing this again. Anyway, you will be well aware that if you’re watching this on the Friday, the World Championship’s
coming up over the weekend. The mens and womens elite road wells. Uh, we’ve got a full preview
and we look at the course and the riders to watch. And you can find that just down here.