What To Wear While Cycling In A City

What To Wear While Cycling In A City


– As former professional
cyclists, we’ve probably spent more time wearing lycra
than bears thinking about. – Yup, and although the
tight cycling shorts and the tight jersey and all
the other tight cycling kit might be appropriate for
longer training rides, sometimes lycra is just not the answer. – No, not for city cycling. You might be cruising gently,
you might not be traveling far, or, perhaps more to the point, you might have to look half-decent when you get to your destination, and actually not have
anywhere to get changed. – So let’s go and take a
look at some of the clothing options available to you for city cycling. (upbeat techno music) – Cycling is a great way
to get around a city. It’s often faster than driving, you take up less space on the road, and of course it doesn’t pollute at all. Cycling is more flexible
than public transport, and it’s healthier, because it’s exercise, and we could all use a little
more of that, couldn’t we? – When cycling in a city, some of us might not
want to look like a pro. We might not want to walk
around the supermarket wearing lycra on the way home. In fact, most of us probably
just want to get to our destinations feeling
comfortable, relaxed, and safe. – Now if you’re just cruising to work on a city bike then you’re not training, and if you’re doing it to save time, then you don’t want to
have to have a shower and get changed when you get to work. You need to be able to
transition seamlessly from bike to office and back to bike again. So you want your outfit to
be functional, and durable, but also aesthetic. Now safety has got to be the
most important thing because cities are full of motor
vehicles as well as people, and interactions with cars can be scary and even downright dangerous for cyclists. Now luckily not often, but
it is one of the most cited reasons why people don’t
want to cycle in the city, because they’re scared of the cars. So be seen to be safe. So you can either do that with lights, or you can go for bright
reflective colors in your clothing. For example, fluro socks,
fluro overshoes, fluro gilet. Bright colors are more easily
seen and research shows that the best place to put
bright colors, reflective things, and light to be seen is on
moving parts of your body. For example, knees and ankles. – Shoes. Now, if you wanna use clip-in pedals, you want to look for
mountain bike varieties. So you have to wear
mountain bike shoes then, meaning that you can get off and walk with your bike should you need to. However, if you’re using
normal pedals like these, well you can go wild. The only thing that you
might want to bear in mind is that open toes, so
sandals or flip flops, can be a little bit risky. If you’re unlucky enough to take a tumble or even if you stay on your
bike and just scuff your toes, if you actually get grazed
feet, well it’s really painful, not to mention quite frustrating
waiting them to heal up so you can actually wear
your normal shoes again. Well all that said, many
of us take that risk. – And then there’s durability. Don’t wear your best
frock or your best suit, especially not if it’s
made of a fragile fabric. Also, probably best to avoid anything that needs to be hand
washed, as you’re just going to be creating a huge
amount of work for yourself. And finally, white clothing. I just really wouldn’t do
it, because the streets and the bikes, they get pretty grubby, and if you’re close to them all the time, it’s not long until your white
clothes end up that way too. Comfort. Even cycling gently means
that you’re gonna be sat on your bum and pedaling. So, clothes that are
too tight or too baggy, too hot or too cold, well they’re just not
gonna be ideal, are they? So we have some top tips for you. – Your trousers should be
loose enough or stretchy enough to allow you to actual pedal in comfort, and most importantly perhaps,
swing your leg over the bike. And then, the only other
thing to bear in mind is your right trouser leg. Now you either use a
clip to keep it tight, or you roll it up, meaning that you don’t get it in the way of your chain. Although in this case of course,
in the absence of a chain, I don’t need to worry about it. – Shorts are the perfect
solution in my opinion, whether you go for the
lycra option or baggies. Basically, there’s always room to move, they preserve your modesty, and they don’t get caught
in the drive chain. Surprisingly, the right
kind of skirt can be an excellent outfit for cycling. Short or tight skirts maybe not, because they are uncomfy and revealing. But a wider skirt can allow
loads of room for pedaling, and actually what you can
do is tuck the back hem up into the front waistband
to preserve your dignity. True Scotsmen, please also take note. For a really really long flowing skirt, you should definitely
tuck it up out of the way because it could be
dangerous if you catch it in the back wheel or the brakes. – Next stop is your underwear. It’s obviously quite an important subject, as it is the layer of clothing that’s right next to your skin, so you want to find
something that’s comfortable, it doesn’t crumple up, or chafe. And one top tip is you
can even get underwear that has built in chamois, much like your normal cycling shorts. So if that’s the sort of
thing that appeals to you, why don’t you check those out. – When you’re cycling,
you’re out in the elements, and that’s one of the
great things about it. But it also presents challenges. It’s important to adapt
your clothing appropriately. – Yeah in hot weather, it’s
best just to wear a t-shirt and swap into your office shirt or blouse when you get there. It’s almost impossible to
avoid sweating when it’s hot, and you’re likely to crumple your clothing underneath your backpack. So save them until you get to work. – Yup, and when it comes
to cold weather, well, there are some great cycling
jackets out there that are both quite stylish and also
wind and water resistant. Ugh, rain is the bane
of every city commuter. Now weighing up all the options, possibly the best thing
to go for is full length waterproof trousers to protect yourself. Alternatively you can just accept that your legs and feet are gonna get soaked, and just take some spare trousers
and shoes for the office. Now on your upper half, cycling
waterproof these days can be very sleek and aesthetic, or
you could go for the poncho, which is maybe not such a good look, but it does protect more
of you from the water. (dramatic instrumental music) A special note to gentlemen here. Please please wear your
trouser waistband high, or use a belt, because otherwise you might end up with a builder’s bum, and honestly nobody wants to see that. Sorry. – No you’re not.
– No, they don’t. – Oh, sorry about that, sorry. – A special note to the ladies as well. You might want to consider a
high necked t-shirt or top, because some people do want to see that and you might be fine showing it off, but it is a risk for wasps and bees. And believe me, speaking from experience, that is not a fun encounter. Well let’s hope that this
video helps you to feel comfortable but also cool
when riding in the city, whether you’re a cyclist who
never stops being a cyclist, even off the bike, or
someone who rides a bike but does not want to look like a cyclist. – Comfortable and cool. Okay now if you would like
to watch another video about city cycling here on GCN, there’s one that you can
click through just down there, where we give you our top tips. Make sure you check it out.