What To Wear At A Bike Park

What To Wear At A Bike Park


– When riding a mountain bike, it’s really important
to get the right gear, both for safety and for comfort. So, here’s GMBN’s guide for
what to wear in the bike park. ( electro rock music) The most important piece
of equipment, obviously, is a helmet, especially
before I drop in down there. I’d recommend if you’re
goin’ to a bike park somewhere where you’re usin’ ski lifts and there’s lots of downhill runs, a full-face helmet is a
really, really good idea. If you’re ridin’ lots of descents, you’re not gonna need the
open-face quite so much ’cause maybe you’re not peddlin’. Maybe if you’re ridin’
a bit more all mountain and goin’ outside the bike park, an open-face might be okay for that, but the number one choice for riding bike parks is a full-face helmet. It’s really important
to find some protection that you’re comfortable
wearin’ in the bike parks. Personally, I wouldn’t go
anywhere near a bike park without some pretty
substantial knee pads on. Other options are obviously
ankle pads, elbow pads, or even full jerseys that
have body armour on them. Totally down to personal
preference but I would say the bare minimum, knee pads
are what you wanna wear. A hydration pack is really good to keep, obviously, your drinks in there, tools, lift pass, don’t forget that one, bit of spare cash and a tube just for if you’re going’ a little bit further on the bike park, you’re
gonna need some spare parts. If I’m maybe sessionin’ downhill track on one side of the trail
that finishes in a village, I maybe might think about
not takin’ this with me, but you just gotta be aware that if you do get into any issues, maybe you puncture or
you have a mechanical, you’re gonna have to find
your way off the mountain. So, if I’m goin’ any distance, I’ll always take a backpack with spares. I tend to wear shorts more often than not. They’re mountain bike-specific shorts. I’ve got a pocket to put my lift pass in. They also come with a
padded lining short as well, so it’s nice and comfortable all day. If I may be ridin’ downhill runs over and over, or it’s cold, I’ll think about wearin’
some downhill trousers. Nice and warm but they also
offer some good protection. Eye protection is a really good idea, especially in dusty or muddy conditions. Goggles work really well
with full-face helmets. They’re designed for
them to sit on the back, so they’re generally the
best option for those. The cross country-style helmet
glasses are a good idea. Gloves, I realise that
some of the world’s top pro downhillers don’t wear gloves ’cause they say they like to feel the bar, but I would never recommend that. I always ride in full-finger gloves. Really important for protecting your hand if you crash ’cause if you cut your hand, that’s not gonna be much fun to ride with. Also, you might wanna
think about a thicker palm of your glove to save
your hands a little bit when you’re riding really rough trails. If you ride in a bike park on flat pedals, a pair of shoes, their really sticky sole is gonna help on the rough stuff, especially on the brakin’ bumps. You might find that if you
wear a normal pair of trainers, you can shuffle a bit around on your pedals, which isn’t the best. If you’re using clips, a
nice set of downhill-style shoes are comfortable, and
they’re gonna offer you more protection than a pair
of cross country shoes. The weather can change really
quick here in the mountains, so it’s important to have a rain jacket if you think you might be
caught out in the bad weather. It’s also a good idea on
ski lifts where they can be really exposed and get really cold. It’s currently 32 degrees in Verbier, so I’m not sure I need this on. ‘Kay, so there’s what
to wear at a bike park. If you wanna see more videos
of my trip here to Vervier, you can click up here for the playlist, or you can click down here for our top 10 bike setup mistakes. Or click on me on this really rad, whippy, wooden berm to subscribe to GMBN.