What Is The Ultimate Winter Bike? | GCN Tech Show Ep. 56

What Is The Ultimate Winter Bike? | GCN Tech Show Ep. 56


(whooshing) – Welcome to the GCN Tech Show. – This week, we’re talking tools, crowdfunding projects, the ultimate winter bike, plus your upgrades and the bike vault. – With no further ado, let’s do it.
– Ooh. (upbeat electronic music) (whooshing) – Now, a really clever
tool that’s just come out is from Clever Standard, and well, it’s an expanding Allen key. So, what does that mean? Well, it means that if you were to round off a bolt, say for instance on your cleats, where you’ve forgotten to use some grease, and when you’ve come to undo them or the salt has started to corrode them, which is quite a common problem for people out there. The actual Allen key, despite being a five
millimeter, for instance, it does in fact expand or widen, up to say, five and a
half or six millimeters, so that when it comes about to slip, and round off the bolt,
instead, it grips it, and you can further undo it. I think that’s a really good idea. – Yeah, I do as well, especially being one of those people that is guilty of not
greasing their cleat bolts. – Just do it. A little bit of advice
for everybody out there, every three months or every four months, something like that, just remove one bolt at a time, put some grease on it, re-fit it, do it with each and every one of them actually.
– Is that why you never answer your phone on the weekend? – Yeah, too busy doing that, on your shoes. – Well, Jon, if that was a clever idea, this is a stomping great idea. I had a look around Indiegogo last week, and I came across this Dutch company called StepTwin from Nieuwegein. While they haven’t reinvented the wheel, they’ve just reinvented how we pedal. – Wow, look at that.
– Yeah. – That’s a nice looking bike, innit? – Featuring dual bionic independent drive technology. – [Jon] Sounds impressive. – [Chris] Well, it’s a mouthful. – [Jon] Yeah. – [Chris] With benefits,
including what they say, eliminates the dead spot. Although when I look at it, it kinda looks like 50%
of the pedal strength is now in the dead spot. – [Jon] Now, it’s also a folding bike, innit, as well.
– [Chris] Yeah. – [Jon] So it’s ideal
for, well, a commute, or a commute that involves
also using a public transport, so a train or a bus. And, well, it’s a multi-size format frame, and it’s also made of titanium. I’m a big fan of titanium bikes. – [Chris] Yeah, but they look pretty cool, but not when they’re painted, Jon. – [Jon] No, although it’s
a bit of a trick, isn’t it? Someone comes along and they think, “That’s gonna be heavy, this. “Steel bike.” And they pick it up, “Oh that’s light, titanium.” – [Chris] Yeah.
– And with just a couple of weeks left to go, you can even save up to
47% of the retail price. So if a stepper bike is
your thing, well, go ahead. – Should we get one each, we could do like a new race series, couldn’t we?
– That’d be good, innit, yeah. – Carpark race series.
– Why not? (whooshing) Now, in the Northern Hemisphere right now, we’re in the depths of winter. And well, it’s miserable, isn’t it? Let’s face it.
– It is a bit, yeah. – And it’s got me thinking
about some of the bike rides and some of the bikes, too, that I owned, specifically for riding during the winter. Because, well, winter bikes
were a real thing, weren’t they? You never used your summer bike, because you’d get, well, laughed at if you used that in the winter. You used to have to have mud guards. Carbon bikes, they weren’t seen. – No.
– Now, those bikes, they were heavy, weren’t they? – They were, they weighed a ton. And they had one sole purpose. They were a workhorse, could survive pretty much unmaintained for an entire winter season. – Yeah, it’s quite surprising, actually, the number of old riding friends of mine who would just get back from a ride, give it a quick spray down with a well-known lubricating fluid, and then would just put
it back in the shed, and well, see it again
the following weekend. – Yeah, and it would never rust, because air never actually got to any of the bare metal, did it? – (laughs) No.
– ‘Cause they were so layered in dirt, and grime, and all the rest of it.
– Yeah, you’re right. Now, I’ve got a question for you, then. Did you ever, when you were pro, ever use winter bikes
specifically, or not? – So, I tried to avoid them. Obviously, you don’t pay for your own bike,
– No. – Which makes a big difference. So then, you don’t really have to incur the cost of
repairing it, or maintaining it. Unless you happen to be
miles away from the team, and you can’t get the bit.
– Yeah. – So, I preferred to ride the proper bike. The bike as it was,
without the mud guards, without all the extra accessories, because I wanted to feel fast when I was training.
– Yeah. – And I didn’t mind that
much getting wet and dirty. But, this winter is the
least I’ve ridden outside since the early 2000s. So a good 18 years, possibly.
– [Jon] Blimey. – And actually now, I
prefer having mud guards. Even though they rattle a bit, they’re a bit heavier,
and the bike feels slower, I want the comfort now, I’m
not all about going fast. – It’s interesting, isn’t it. Because people, they
sometimes, they look at you and they think, “Why on
earth is he riding this for?” You know, like my winter bike, you’ve seen it outside. It’s heavy, isn’t it? Yeah, old aluminum bike,
it’s got mud guards on. All right, it’s got
Dura-Ace groupset on it, but it’s a really old one. But, the way I look at it is that that bike is keeping
me dry when I’m riding. And I was just like you, you know, like, in the winter, sometimes I would think about it, “Oh, actually, I’ll just go
out and ride the race bikes.” And they’d be absolutely fine. Just ’cause you like the way it feels, ’cause it’s much faster, it always feels. It’s psychologically.
– Yeah, and then you train a little harder, ’cause you feel good
about what you’re doing. – Yeah. – But then also, it has like the whole, you have to spend a lot of time
maintaining it then as well. – Yeah, you’re right there.
– Which is a bit of a pain. So, if I was to redo the last few years, then maybe I would invest
in some proper mud guards, and maybe actually a proper winter bike. – Yeah, it’s interesting as well, that now, quite a lot of pros are actually putting mud guards on,
whereas before, they wouldn’t. They would use summer
tires all year round. – Yeah.
– I don’t know how, because there’s nothing worse, is there, puncturing in the winter. Now, all right, then,
my ultimate winter bike. I’m gonna run you through it. So, it’s not gonna be a carbon. Actually, it would be a carbon
frame, with mud guard mounts. – Yeah, for this one, money is no object.
– Yeah, yeah, yeah. In fact, Brad Wiggins, he had Terry Dolan build him a carbon frame
with mud guard mounts, and everything like that. – Nice.
– Yeah. So it’s race geometry, but
you could just about fit a pair of mud guards on them. Whereas nowadays, it’s
hard to fit mud guards on a lot of race bikes, because
the clearance is so tight. – Yeah, true. Especially Aero bikes. – Yeah. Oh, yeah. But I suppose if it’s really Aero, the frame could act as
a mud guard, almost. – Yeah, that’s a good point. – Yeah, so no, I’d have a carbon frame with mud guard mounts, I reckon I’d have Dynamo hubs, as well. – Yeah?
– Yeah. ‘Cause they’re crackin’ aren’t they, and you don’t have to
worry about batteries. – [Chris] No, it is genius.
– Yeah. I would have electronic shifting. – [Chris] Yep.
– [Jon] Yeah, it’s funny, that, because you always think yourself, I’ve never had a mistimed
shift or a poorly shift, – [Chris] No, that’s a good point. – Done with electronic group set. But with mechanical, you do. And in the winter is when your bike gets covered in all the gunk and that’s when the cable’s
gonna ultimately get– – You know, what I used to do is run full-length external cables and then zip-tie them to the frame. – Done that as well. – Yeah, but it works, doesn’t it? – Yeah, I did that with
a race bike one year, had a terrible back brake, ugh. I remember I just ran it,
just zip-tied it and ran it, and everyone was like, laughing at me. – Yeah, but it worked. – Except, yeah, it worked perfectly. Yeah, so obviously I’ll have mud guards, – Carbon frame–
– Disc brakes? Disc brakes, a hundred percent. Hundred percent, yeah. I would also replace all the grease on the
bearings with Marine grease, something like that
– Yeah, that’s a good idea. – So it’ll just last longer. But there’s not a lot, really. – Would you go for the same
standard race geometry? – Yeah, I think I would do, yeah. Because, I figure I don’t like the change. – No.
– It takes me a long time to get used to a bike.
– Yeah, do you remember gettin’ off the winter bike years ago, and you get onto your new bike and you’ll feel all
twitchy, or the race bike. And you’d be a little bit confused for the first few rides.
– Yeah. You want it really, basically, I want exactly the same bike, but I want mud guards
on it and disc brakes. In the summer, I quite like
to have rim brakes, still. – Right, okay, yeah. Well, that makes sense. – We’re different on that, aren’t we? You love having disc brakes all year? – I would go discs all year round, yeah. So, the point of this story is, we want to know, what is
your ideal winter bike? Is it the same as what
Jon and I would use, because I think we’ve
kind of agreed there. – Yeah, yeah.
– Haven’t we? – That’s a first. Or are you someone who, all year round, you use your race bike, you don’t care about the
premature drive train wear and using really lightweight tires that are puncturing at all opportunities, basically, where the opportunity arises. But yeah, let us know
your ultimate winter bike, or are you like the people
I met down in Australia who laughed at me when I merely mentioned the fact that I had a winter bike. They couldn’t believe that. They said I must be ever so rich. But I said, no, I’m just– – I just don’t like gettin’ wet. – I just don’t wanna get wet. (both chuckling)
Basically, so yeah. Let us know your ultimate winter setup, or do you only have one bike? If so, what do you do
different in the winter? Look forward to this one. (whooshing) – Now, CeramicSpeed, famous of course for ceramic bearings on bikes, have just launched a new
oversized pulley wheel system, this one designed specifically for cyclo-cross bikes: the CeramicSpeed X. – Yep, only available for
SRAM clutched rear mechs, so the Rival and the Force 1s. – And, well, the actually
pulley wheel sizes are 14 teeth for the upper
and 18 teeth for the lower, which is slightly different
from the road-going version which is 13 for the upper
and 19 for the lower. – Yep, still quoting reductions of around 30 to 40
percent on the resistance, so that’s quite a lotta chain. – Yeah, and apparently Tom Pidcock, former World Junior Cyclo-cross Champion, and I think World Cup leader at the moment when we recorded this, well, he’s actually been
spotted using that, too. – [Chris] Yeah, so look out for these on a rear mech near you,
well, at some point. – [Jon] Yeah, soon. – Jon, we have a public
service announcement from Specialized. – Oh, go on. – Yep, and it’s regarding
their Future Shock headsets. – Oh yeah, the suspension system? – Yeah. Pretty funky, but the 2017, ’18, and ’19 model years have been affected
on the following models: the Roubaix, the Diverge,
the Sirrus, and the Ruby. – Ooh, okay. So, apparently there is some chance of stress corrosion of the steerer tube. So just keep an eye out, so maybe take your bike
down to a local dealer if you do have one, or, alternatively, check
on the Specialized website exactly what you can do. Interesting, isn’t it? That bike, or that headset system is what Pete Sagan used last
year to win Paris-Roubaix. So there we are. I did hear a cheeky
little rumor, actually, whilst I was down under. – We love a rumor. – They reckon there’s gonna be a new Specialized
Roubaix launch this year. – Ooh.
– So, excited to see that. – And you can guarantee that it’ll have an amazing color scheme, ’cause new Specialized always do. – Yeah, especially if
your name’s Peter Sagan. – Well, yeah. – Yeah. (drill whirring) (bell rings) – It’s now time for Screw
Riding Upgrades, Buy Upgrades. It’s the part of the show where you submit pictures of your upgrades using our uploader tool down below. For your chance to win the capron, as Oliver Bridgewood calls it. Basically, it’s a workshop apron. I can’t find it, so there’s a good chance that Olly’s doing something with his grubby little
hands instead, wearing it. But anyway, if you’ve got an upgrade, make sure you submit it
down there in the comments. Well, you’ll find the uploader tool down there below in the description. – Yep, anyway, last week we
had Andrew and his Cannondale, who was up against Jonathan
and his bamboo bike. – [Jon] Bamboo bike? – [Chris] Bamboo, it was a cracking bike. And if you saw the video, you’d know why. – [Jon] Pandas love ’em. – Right. Turns out if you put
them next to radiators, the top tubes crack. – Oh, right, okay. – If you ever buy a bamboo bike, Jon. Anyway, it was incredibly close, and the results were, (drumming on table)
– Go on. – 49 to 50 percent, and with 50… I know, it doesn’t quite add up. – Hang on, there’s one percent missing. But, I suppose, well– – Just the way I do maths, Jon. – 50 and now 49 and a half, I dunno. – Jonathan’s bamboo bike. – Wow, well congratulations, Jonathan. Get in touch with us
on Facebook to arrange the delivery of your apron. And, well, send us a picture of you, I don’t know, fixing up your bamboo bike, something like that. Right, anyway. This week, then, let’s move on to the contenders. First up is Unai from Valencia in Spain, a place I know very well, I used to live just down
the road from there. – Nice. – Now, Unai, they always wanted to ride an authentic Orbea Euskatel road bike. So in the summer of 2017, they started looking for the perfect second-hand machine to
fulfill their dreams. For only 240 Euros, a suitable
aluminum frame was found, fitted with an old Shimano 105 group set. A cheap saddle, stock wheels, and, well, an ugly stem. Unai did not like any of these, but the Starship frame looked promising. I did like those Starship frames, actually, from Orbea.
– Yeah, they were nice. – Bit by bit, the orange
beauty was upgraded, first replacing the stem
with a long pro-looking 130 millimeter ITM
Superlight model, along– – [Chris] Good length.
– [Jon] Yeah, that is, 130. Along with an ITM 44
centimeter bars, pretty wide. – [Chris] Yeah. – And a full Campagnolo
Veloce 10-speed groupset. Then the wheels, a brand-new
set of Mavic Aksium Elite, fitted with Vittoria Rubino Pro tires. The change was huge in
performance, apparently. And last but not least, well, they decided to carry out the
GCN one-by drivetrain hack, obviously been watching my video. And, well, they got rid
of the front derailleur, and now the bike looks
absolutely fabulous. The perfect orange machine beneath the orange trees. That looks good, doesn’t it? – [Chris] I’m gonna stop
you right there, Jon. Look at the drop of those bars. – [Jon] Yeah, that’s perfect. – [Chris] That’s how bars used to be. – [Jon] That’s a big drop. Nearly touching the tire, well it’s the same height as the tires, aren’t they, on the drops. – [Chris] I like that. – [Chris and Jon] Anyway. – Unai is up against
Antonio from Portugal, a friend of his called Nuno asked him to restore his childhood bike, a 1996 Vitus frame made
from Columbus Cromor. – Ooh, nice. That must’ve been one
of the last Vitus bikes, I reckon, before its reincarnation. – It was the year prior I took up cycling, so I don’t know that much about it. – Oh, okay. – Sorry. Originally had Campag
Record from the same year, but the only remaining bits
were the bottom bracket, the brake calipers, and
the front derailleur. You know, I’m not surprised
about the bottom bracket. – [Jon] Yeah, bolt-proof. – [Chris] Yeah, they were incredible. The fork is a carbon Look, the stem and handlebar
are from the same era. The saddle is a Selle Italia SLR. And the objective was to keep the steel, but to make a current
replica of the mythical bike with Portuguese Joaquim Agostinho, who won on Alpe d’Huez
with the Flandria team. – [Jon] Whoa, blimey!
– [Chris] Nice. – [Jon] Nice, so I like
what he’s done with that. – [Chris] Yeah, he’s sanded it right down, he’s blasted it, repainted
it, treated it all. That is stunning. – [Jon] Yeah, got rid of the bosses on the top tube as well,
actually, for the… – [Chris] Yeah, it’s popped a
couple underneath if you look. – [Jon] Yeah, yeah, exactly. And no, put bottle cage mounts, I think, because it looked like one
of them was rounded off. Looks like it was zip-tied holding on the bottle cage, there, onto the Elite Ciussi cage. Oh, I used to love those cages. – [Chris] I love that coloring. In fact, there’s another team in Flanders that races in those colors, now. – [Jon] Well, Ridley, a coupla years ago, they made a bike for Lotto Soudal. – [Chris] Yeah, they did, yeah. – [Jon] I think it looks classic, that. – [Chris] But it’s not up to us, Jon. – No, no, no. You know what to do, vote up there. Who’s it gonna be? That classic-lookin’ Orbea, that brings back some great memories. – [Chris] Yeah. – Or, well…
– Iban Mayo? Back in the day.
– (sighs) Yeah. Oh, get me all teary-eyed now. Or, is it gonna be that
Flandria recreation? Re-creation, not recreation. Left my memory down in Australia. Right, vote up there, who’s it gonna be? Next week, we will have
two more battling it out. And well, we will announce
the winner of the apron. (whooshing) Bike of the week time, and well, last week, it was a big battle. Because it was between the Specialized Allez
Sprint of Peter Sagan, and the Cannondale SystemSix
of team EF Education First who this year have shortened the team name quite considerably.
– It’s a good job, too. – That makes it a lot easier for us. And well, the winner… – It was, unsurprisingly I think, although it was very close, the Specialized Allez
Sprint of Peter Sagan. – Yeah, it was a nice-looking bike, that. I have to say, I saw it
in the mechanic’s tent early in the morning, about half-seven. Walked in, and I looked
over and I thought, “There’s a different bike over there.” It was certainly a different paint work, and the paint work was
what really stood out. ‘Cause the green was way more metallic than on a carbon bike. And as I got closer and closer, and I was obsessing over it, as I do, all of a sudden, there was (rolls tongue) paparazzi goin’ wild, and
well, yeah, those pictures– – Did they get any pictures
of the bike, though? Or just you? – No, sadly, just the bike, none of me. Well, there might’ve been some
of the back of my head, but. – Best angle.
– Yeah. Right, this week, it’s the battle between the bike of Caleb Ewan, – [Chris] Yep, the Lotto
Soudal Ridley Noah. – [Jon] Ooh, yeah, nice
lookin’ bike, that. I did have to, I did get a close look at that bike. – [Chris] Yeah?
– [Jon] Yeah, yeah. He did some customized bits on it. – Really? – Customized shifting, yeah. – Oh, nice.
– You have to watch the video of that pro bike coming out soon. And who’s he up against? – [Chris] He’s gone up against Patrick Bevin’s CCC Giant TCR. – [Jon] Ooh, new team. And he had a good Tour Down
Under as well, didn’t he? – Well, he did for a while, until the crash.
– Yeah, he lost it in the last day, didn’t he? – Yeah.
– Sadly. But yeah, you know what
to do, vote up there, who’s it gonna be? Caleb Ewan’s Ridley, or Patty
Bevin and that Giant TCL? (whooshing) Right now, time for the Bike Vault, which is, well… We always say it’s our
favorite part of the show, but, well to be honest, every part is our
favorite part of the show. But we’ve got a little soft
spot for it, let’s face it. – We get to be really
aggressive with the bell. – Yeah, in fact, I’ve not been
here for a couple of weeks. And I have noticed, your bell
ringing technique is, well… Excellent. (bell clanging) Right, okay. So how do you get him to
ring that bell more or less? Well, basically, you
have to submit a picture of your bike to us using the uploader tool found down in the description below, and include bits of information about you, your bike, where you come from, and a detailed description of it ’cause we always like to
nerd out on those details. – Yeah. – And we rate it nice, or super-nice. – Yep, and there are no losers here. – No, and a super-nice
gets the ring of the bell. So, with no further ado, let’s crack on with the first bike this week, right. – Right, I’ve chosen a few
that I hope you like, Jon. – Well, it has to be a majority vote. We can’t have one nice, one super-nice, and you get a bell ring.
– True. – It has to be, yeah, two
super-nices for the bell to ring. Right, crack on. – First up, Len. Independent Fabrication tie, Crown Jewel, – Ooh.
– and a painted tie frame. – Yeah, there we are. – [Chris] Taipei, Taiwan. Just finished his new
build with custom geometry. Handmade frame set from the states. “It’s my first titanium bike,” but also his third road bike. “The riding quality is so
good, I love it so much.” And it’s easy to see why, you
got these Campa Bora wheels. – [Jon] Oh, beautiful wheels. – [Chris] Campa groupset, it’s stunning. I like that.
– [Jon] Vittoria tires. – [Chris] Oh, it’s a
nice-looking bike, that. – [Jon] Quarq power meter.
– [Chris] It’s a lovely bike. – [Jon] Yeah, I mean the
backdrop, to be fair, is not the most adventurous
or anything like that. And the walls could do with repointing, and also the tile’s a bit mucky, but– – To be honest, Jon, I hadn’t even seen the wall or the tiles. – Yeah, first thing I look at. – I was lookin’ at the bike. – First thing I look at. Right, but, in seriousness, beautiful bike, ring the bell. (bell clanging) – That’s how it happens these days, Jon. – Right, okay. Right, super-nice. Okay, next up is Antonis. This is the BMC Teammachine, SLR02. And now Antonis is in Greece. It’s been upgraded, it’s
got Integra Enduros, and also some Campagnolo wheels. It’s what, winter
training on the new bike. So that looks like it’s a winter bike. – Nice winter bike. Where are your mud guards? (chuckling) – (chuckles) Cheeky. Look at that, that river
looks rough behind, dunnit? – [Chris] It does, yeah. – [Jon] Let’s see,
that’s the Alfeios river in Pyrgos in Greece, for those
of you who are interested. Not been there, myself. That’s a nice winter ride, innit? – Well, judging from the water it looks like a scary place to
have stood to take a picture. – [Jon] White water rafting is
more suitable, there, innit? The orange bottle doesn’t
do it for me, personally. – [Chris] Right, saddlebag, Jon? – [Jon] Saddlebag, um… – [Chris] I think it’s nice. – [Jon] Yeah, it’s a nice, it’s a nice. Nice bike, Antonis. – [Chris] It was.
– [Jon] Right, who’s up next? – Next up is Peter with a recycled frame, as
well, in Montreal, Canada. – Keep your hand off that bell. You’re going too close to it, right. – Chris King headset, Thomson seatpost, Paul components. – Ooh! – [Jon] God! Don’t see those very
often, Paul components! – [Chris] No, you don’t, very rare. That’s incredible, actually. Velocity rims, Schwalbe tires,
Brooks saddle and bar tape, Jagwire steel braided cables, – [Jon] Nice.
– [Chris] Campa Veloce, 3T bars, generic stem (chuckling). Velo Orange mudguards, Randonneur racks, frame, and fork, chromed
to a high-gloss finish. My Saturday night special. If you know what it’s about– – Ideal, ideal (laughs) Ideal for Mr. Travolta. (funk music) – I was gonna ignore that bit. If you knocked that up
in a Saturday night, I’m well impressed. – Yeah, you got some serious
chroming skills there, Peter in Montreal. (sighs) I don’t know what to
think of it, to be honest. – [Chris] It’s the most monochrome color I’ve ever seen on a bike. As in like, it’s phenomenal. – [Jon] Center stand, as well. I mean, there’s a few
faux-pas here, let’s face it. The chain is not in the correct gearing, the valves are not lined up, nor are the tire logos and all that. But, to be honest, it’s
just a chrome beauty, innit? – Yeah. I think it deserves– – Chrome bottle. Yeah, go on, give it a ring. – Come on! (bell clanging) – Sorry Jon.
– Honestly. Sometimes I wonder. Right, next up is Shawn from Richmond near the Vancouver International Airport. – [Chris] Nice.
– [Jon] Out for a rare dry winter ride in Vancouver. It’s the 2018 Factor
ONE, with Dura-Ace 9170 and Black Inc wheels, got Black Inc, that’s part of Factor, isn’t it? – It is. – So it’s got Black Inc bars and stem, and also seatpost there. That’s one of the only bikes, really, with the external steerer tube, innit? – [Chris] Uh, yeah. – [Jon] That and the– – [Chris] New Cielo, isn’t it? – [Jon] Uh, yes, yes, the new Cielo, yes. – [Chris] So there’s a few there. You know what, it’s make a
stiff front land on those bikes. – Yeah. – Raced on them for a whole year. – That’s a nice, it is
nice-looking, isn’t it? – [Chris] I love a silver, kind of chromey paint finish on a bike.
– [Jon] Yeah. You don’t see many of them, do you? – [Chris] You don’t.
– [Jon] It’s hard to see, I mean, I think there’s been a little bit of Photoshop trickery from Shawn, but yeah, it’s… I, personally, I think it looks great. The saddlebag’s pretty
minimalistic, one bottle cage, looks like those bottle
cages are pretty fancy, too. – [Chris] One top tip for Shawn, – [Jon] Go on. – [Chris] Don’t ride that bike in the wet, ’cause your bottle will get filthy. I actually– – Oh, it’s got the split
tube, doesn’t it, of course. – Yeah, when I raced on them, I put a Crudcatcher on the down tube to keep my bottle clean. – [Jon] Did you? – [Chris] It’s a little bit of a hack. And it looked awful, but it
meant that I wasn’t getting ill. – [Jon] Yeah, true, yeah.
– [Chris] Anyway, super-nice? – Yeah, go on. (bell clanging) Right.
– Sorry Jon. – Go on, who’s up next, then? – Right, next up, Daniel, riding a Canyon Aero
Road CF SLX in Singapore. – [Jon] We’ve got a lotta
viewers in Singapore. – [Chris] Yeah? – [Jon] We’ve got a hell of a lots of viewers in Singapore, yeah. – [Chris] I’m surprised how big the cycling community is there, actually. – [Jon] Massive, absolutely massive. In fact, I know a guy called
Daniel from Singapore. – [Chris] Ask your friend about– – [Jon] He didn’t have a Canyon
last time I rode with him, I don’t think, no, he had a Pinarello. But anyway, I’ll have to ask him. – Right, custom painted Canyon, kinda what he’s done basically
is invert the paint job on the left-hand side of the bike. – Oh, nice. – Depending on where you look, it’s a different bike on each side. – It’s hard to see, innit, without moving the head around a lot. But what’s he got, he’s
got Integra, is that? Integra Reynolds wheels,
– Integra. – [Jon] Gold chain by the looks of things. I can’t see, all the blood’s rushing to wrong side of my head
when I’m doing that. But, you know, I… – [Chris] I think it’s a really cool idea. – Yeah, it’s a cool idea, but, it’d be better done if
the picture was different. Personally, I think it’s a nice bike. – I think it’s a really nice bike. – It’s a nice bike, but there’s a lot of red and black bikes
out there, isn’t there? – There are a lot of red, it’s one of the best color
schemes, though, Jon. – Yeah, there’s a lotta
red and black bikes, there’s also a lotta black and red bikes. – [Chris] Yes, well,
there’s two in this picture. – [Jon] Yeah. – [Chris] Or, is there one? I can’t tell.
– [Jon] I dunno, I dunno. – [Chris] Should we give it a nice? ‘Cause of the confusion? – [Jon] Yeah, yeah. Daniel, nice bike. But you’ve left us confused, and with our heads on the side. – Oof. – Heads will roll. Final one then. Michael, Vancouver, Washington, USA. Course there’s loads of Vancouvers all over the world, isn’t there? This is Michael’s Co-Motion Camino, Ultegra DI2 disc brakes,
apparently it’s the commuter bike intended for year-round transportation. It’s custom-built,
hand-built in Eugene, Oregon using Reynolds eight five three tubing. – Nice, bet that’s silky smooth. – Oh, I remember when that first came out. Oh, people were gettin’
so excited about that. Rolf Prima wheels, don’t see Rolf wheels much anymore, do you?
– [Chris] You don’t. – [Jon] Was it US Postal used to used them once upon a time?
– [Chris] Yeah the Vector Pros with gold rims. – Yeah, my dad’s got a pair of those. They’re so light, actually. Silca frame pump painted to match. Sometimes people go a
little bit overboard, but I think that looks all right. – Yeah, it is subtle. – Yeah, Chris King headset. And, wow. I think that’s… Look at the size of that front mudguard. – Yeah, I was gonna say, the world’s longest front mudguard. To the point that I think, Jon, that it might even be a rear mudguard mounted on the front of the bike. I’m not certain. – [Jon] Don’t know what Michael has done, but Michael is not gonna
be gettin’ wet feet. – [Chris] No, I like it, it’s genius. And it fits in really well with our talking point of the week, which was, just how good
a proper winter bike is. – Yeah, yeah. And I personally, I think that would be the ultimate winter bike, quite possibly.
– Yeah, I think it would be. – I mean, yeah, I did say I want carbon. But, I would want electronic groupset, but do you know what,
that’s a good looking bike. – [Chris] Yeah I love it.
– [Jon] Custom as well. – [Chris] I’ve got a
thing for orange, as well. – [Jon] Have you? – [Chris] Being married to a
Dutch lady, that’s what it is. – [Jon] Yeah, yeah. I always thought the rammer bank, that’s like a Tequila Sunrise
paint job, innit, that? (Chris laughs)
Go on, yeah, ring it. (bell clanging) Right, right, right. Now, if you want your bike to get a super-nice, maybe you do, maybe you don’t with that
bell ringin’ technique. You know what to do, submit your pictures down there using the uploader tool. (whooshing) So there we are, nearly the
time for the end of the show. But don’t worry, we got
loads of great videos comin’ up in the next week. Including, on Saturday, I get to check out the bike of Pete Sagan. – Yes.
– That aluminum bike. So keep a close eye on that, it’s an absolute beauty.
– That should be good. – Check out the paintwork. – And then on Sunday, there’s a feature that I’m genuinely jealous about, because I would’ve loved to have gone and seen this workshop. You’ve got Rob Hayles teaching
us how to make bike pa… Well, teaching us? You’re watching Rob Hayles
build bike parts in his shed. – Yeah, or his workshop. Basically a guy who’s
been there, done that, he’s got the World Champ stripes, he is a master at work. I’m so excited about going to see him, because he’s made little bits and pieces for the best in the world. – Yeah, and he’s done it
for years now, as well. – Yeah, yeah. So you know what to do. Make sure you subscribe to the channel, click that little bell notification, too, so you get a little alert that goes – [Jon and Chris] Ding ding! – Yeah, or something like
that, on your phones. So you can check out the
latest videos that we’re doing. And also, why not check out the GCN shop? We’ve got a sale on at the moment, haven’t we, as well?
– Yep, up to 50% off on certain things. – Whoa, there’s gonna be
some bargains on there. And well, now, for another great video, how about clicking your pro setup tips – Yeah.
– Just over here on Chris. Don’t miss it. – That was good fun, doing that. Silicon spray everywhere. – Ooh.