What Is The Right Way To Wrap Cycling Handlebars? | The GCN Tech Clinic

What Is The Right Way To Wrap Cycling Handlebars? | The GCN Tech Clinic


– Now, I’m back and a big
thanks to Si for looking after the GCN Tech Clinic last week. And also I’m glad he didn’t
faint over the question I sneakily added in at the end there when he had to answer a
question asking to explain the difference between a
cyclocross bike and a gravel bike. – Oh my word, this is like
opening Pandora’s box. How can Jon have left
this question to last. It’s going to take an
hour and a half at least to even get started on this. (sighs) Okay. – Let’s move on and see what questions we can tackle this week. First up, a question from
Tarcis who wants to know about chains and are
they directional or not. How to recognise them,
brands and the rules. Thanks and he loves the show. Well, this one is actually
fairly complex in that there’s no easy way to
identify if your chain has a direction or not. Ultimately when you’re installing it, actually read the instructions. I know people haven’t done it in the past and they’ve actually
fitted a chain on backward. Yet it can happen surprisingly. As for compatibility, well, 11-speed, we’re kind of all laughing and happy. Because Campagnolo, Sram
and Shimano their chains are all interchangeable with
one another’s cassettes. To a pretty good degree
actually, I’ve tried it out and they work alright. And also you’ve got KMC chains
and they work fine there. It’s when we go to 10-speed
that things get a little bit more complicated and a
little bit more difficult. So, Shimano and Sram, they’re OK, they work with one another. If you try using one of
theirs on Campagnolo. And Campagnpolo’s chains on
Shimano and Sram’s cassettes then you don’t get optimal shifting. So it’s not really advised. So basically if you use Campagnolo, stick with the Campagnolo chain
or use a KMC or Wipperman. Some of those chains,
other chains, actually, are universal so they work across all different brands of groups there. So that’s really what to stick with. And then Shimano and Sram
you can just interchange them and they’re fine. So there you are, that’s
for your 10-speed. Next one is from Betty Fischer. Betty wants to know, can you
put disc brakes on a bike that has rim brakes? They always ride to
school in rainy conditions and discs would be fantastic. Unless you’ve got the Wilier Cento 10 NDR, I think it’s called. You cannot, because that bike
does allow you to actually run either direct rim
brakes or disc brakes. I’ve not seen any other frames
like that that allow it. I have seen, however,
some brackets or fittings that allow you to retrofit a disc brake onto a non-disc specific frame. I wouldn’t recommend using that though. It’s a bit of a bodge hack. To be honest a bit of
a recipe for disaster. You want decent braking, don’t
risk messing everything up by putting those one, it’s
just really not worth it. OK, next up, question
from Dave Pratt who asks When sealant dries out,
what happens to it? If I add more, will it be less effective? Will I eventually fill up the tyre? It’s a great question actually. I was also looking at
some sealant yesterday. Ultimately, it does yes. And I found out the hard way because one season I
actually punctured a lot when I was racing and I decided
to fill my tubular tyres. Obviously not totally filled
but put some sealant in them to try to prevent any punctures mid race. So after I finished racing
and about a year later I got the race wheels
back down out of the shed and I tried to put some air in them. However, the sealant had moved
around and clogged the valve. So yeah, basically it does clog it up. Some of the sealants they
on mountain bike tyres or cyclocross tubeless tyres
or standard road tubeless tyres they actually coat the
inside of tyre with latex when it dries up. Sometimes though it can
basically come in little clumps and you can pick those
out of the tyre as well. What I would be keen to find out though, is if you were to put
it into an inner tube and rest it at the bottom
away from the valve after say a year or so,
would it actually go solid and if you tried to pump it up
would no air pass through it? And you’d have a little bit of bad riding. You know, the feel. I don’t know, I’m going to give that a go. Alright now Chuck Clark wants to know, If they switch to the
increasingly popular option of a single chain ring on their road bike can they replace the rear
derailieur and 11-speed cogset for a 14-speed Rohloff hub? Oh Chuck, the Rohloff hub. Now for those of you who
don’t know what that is, basically gears are
internal to the hub shell. So you can get rid of all
the sprockets on the rear and just have a single
sprocket drive the rear wheel. Inside of that hub there’s 14
gears and gear spread ratios are actually really really wide. So it’s a great, almost
maintenance free solution. However, if you do have to maintain it, I’ve seen the inside of a Rohloff hub and it’s not something to
tackle unless you really know what you’re doing. But it’s certainly an
option for you, Chuck. One thing to bear in mind, is actually the controls of gear shifting. So have a little look around
and see what’s available as obviously you can’t
just connect it up to a standard ergo power,
STI or double tap lever. So make sure you’re happy
with those gear shifter options available. And finally, what I can only class is
a can of worms basically because this question always
lights up the comments. Jeffrey wants to know, Why is handlebar tape always
wrapped up from the bar end to the top and secured by ugly tape? In Jeffrey’s opinion. Well, you could actually finish
the tape with some superglue doing away with the ugly
tape that you call it. So the electrical tape or PVC tape that we normally finish bars with. Or instead of wrapping a lot around there actually just have a
very thin amount of tape to finish off with. The reason why, personally,
myself and every single pro mechanic I’ve ever
asked, starts at the bottom and finishes at the top. Is that when you move your hands towards the brake hoods you’re
not flaring up any tape. And basically it looks ugly, it looks bad. However, there is one
rider in the Pro Peloton that I know that actually prefers
to have his handlebar tape start at the top, finish at the bottom. And that’s (mumbles). So just personal preference
but there’s no pro mechanic out there that does this
as a matter of course. We asked all of them at the Dubai Tour and all of them just looked at us like, like we were crazy really
for even asking the question. So there we are. Now remember as well to
leave your questions for the GCN Tech Clinic on
all forms of social media using the hashtag askgcntech. And remember as well to
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friend if you enjoyed it. Or just share it with them anyway. And for a great video on the power metres of the 2018 Peloton, click just down here.