We’re actually making a MTB product that you suggest

We’re actually making a MTB product that you suggest


Mountain bikes have come a long way. Around the time I was born they resembled
beefed up road bikes with gnarly tires. Every year they got closer to what we’re
familiar with today. Some advancements were born of necessity,
while others of experimentation. Surely suspension forks were big news when
they first came out. So were disc brakes. But there are other unsung hero’s that we
take for granted. Take, for instance, the clutch in your derailleur. You don’t see it, like you do suspension
fork, but it’s there helping to keep your chain on. Before clutches it was up to this spring to
do all the work. And you’ll find other examples on a modern
trail bike, like the thru axle, and the tubeless tire. Many of these products were written off as
unnecessary when they first came out, and to be fair mountain bikes were fun long before
we made any of the advancements you see today. But it’s also hard to argue with the fact
that modern bikes are really capable. You could almost call them aircraft. And so, we’ll continue to find new problems
and create solutions for them. And that’s what this video is about. Last spring during my visit to Box Components,
we got to mess around on their 3D printer and CNC machine to see how prototyping works. Since then Ken and I have been throwing around
the idea of designing a real product on this channel. It would work like this. You put your ideas in the comment section
of this video Box and I review the comments and find something
feasible that doesn’t infringe on any patents. Box assigns an actual engineer to the task
of designing this product Actual audience members get recruited as product
testers And finally, I demonstrate what we came up
with in a video There’s also a very real possibility that
the product could go to market, but let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First, we need an idea. It has to be drivetrain related, and it needs
to solve a problem. As an example, I’ll tell you the problem
I found and how I tried to solve it. The problem is spoke guards. In the United States these are required equipment
on new bikes. Why? Because if your chain shifts off the back
of your cassette it can get tangled up in your spokes and cause your rear wheel to lock
up. But almost everyone removes their spoke guard. In fact its known colloquially as a dork disc. It rattles around, cracks, turns yellow, and
looks completely out of place on a multi thousand dollar bike. Plus, most of us know how to adjust our limit
screws prevent problems anyway. But limit screws only work until they don’t. A long enduro race, a day of rough backcountry
singletrack, or a lapse in maintenance, can result in a catastrophe. The spoke guard is supposed to be a failsafe
for when things aren’t working perfectly. And in fact, really sturdy aluminum spoke
guards are commonplace on downhill bikes. So why can’t we make a sturdy, nice looking
spoke guard for trail bikes? When I’m at Crafted Workshop, you know Johnny
isn’t going to be turning a salad bowl , or building a stool. It’s gonna be something really weird. For experimentation and fitment, we made a
3D printed disc that pressure fit on to the hub, staying free and clear of the spokes. Using a laser cutter, we made a sturdier prototype
out of wood that would also pressure fit, and have serious style points. Aluminum, carbon, or nylon would definitely
make more sense than wood, but this is hilarious and a good proof of concept. We ended up printing a spacer to make sure
everything would stay in place, and I brought the Dude Disc home so Johnny could get back
to editing. I had a hell of a time getting it to clear
the cassette. But with johnny and his—craftsmanship out
of my way, I could tweak our design with a car jack, a glass bowl, and a large copper
nut. In the end, it worked, just barely. And you’ve got to admit, it looks pretty
cool. But it’s clear that I’m no engineer, and
a cool looking dork disc wouldn’t cut it as an actual product idea. Or would it? This is where you guys come in. We’ll be checking the comment section for
a few weeks so don’t rush, think about it. Remember that this idea needs to be drivetrain
related, so anything that makes the bike go. Before you write anything, state a problem
first. What problem does your idea solve? Think of failsafes like the dude disc, things
that would make a drivetrain more reliable. Box is serious about assigning an engineer
to a task inspired by this comment section, and we all get to see it play out. So follow Box MTB on instagram for updates,
and also check out crafted workshop if you find this kind of stuff oddly satisfying. Thanks for riding with me today and I’ll
see you next time.