We Tested Google’s Tips for Getting Stains Out of Your Clothes. You’re Welcome.

We Tested Google’s Tips for Getting Stains Out of Your Clothes. You’re Welcome.


Sam: So let’s say you’re out and about, you
get a stain on your t-shirt and there’s no washing machine in sight. What do you
do? Probably pull out your phone and Google some quick stain removal tips. But
are any of those tips actually any good? So today on reactions we are going to
test a few different types of stains: bacon grease, red wine, and animal blood.
So yeah, that is animal blood but it is food grade so we got it from a local market here in DC.
George: We did not get this from an intern or in fact any other
human, and we are decked out in the proper safety gear, and we do not
recommend, in fact please don’t try this particular demo at home.
Sam: For today we will be using a 100% cotton t-shirt, so keep that in mind because whatever you
get a stain on might not be 100% cotton so these will not necessarily behave in
the same way.
George: Also they might destroy your shirt, you don’t want that. Well let’s dive right in.
Sam: So, red wine. So, George if you could open that up, then I’m gonna run through a few of the things that Google has told us will
help remove it. So first we’ve got white wine, next we’ve got isopropyl alcohol or
rubbing alcohol, and hydrogen peroxide, both of which you’ll probably find in
your medicine cabinet. Then we’ve got some table salt, boiling
hot water, and our control, cold water. So George if you could turn on that hot
water, and let’s stain this shirt. George: Let’s do it. All right and now we wait five minutes for the stain to set. Five Minutes Later. George: Okay so should we start with the cold water? Sam: Yeah, let’s do it. George: Alright so we put
three drops of stain on six spots of this shirt, and we are now gonna put 10
drops of cold water and see what happens. George: Working?
Sam: It’s not looking good for you. George: Okay well cold water, as you would expect, doesn’t seem to do much of anything. Alright, what do you want to try next? Sam: Let’s try this white wine. So 10 drops of white wine, let’s see what happens. It’s also not great
George: Also does not seem to be doing very much.
Should we try rubbing alcohol next? Sam: Let’s try it. So we’ve got the isopropyl
alcohol, better known as rubbing alcohol. Let’s see what this does. George: I have to say it looks slightly better than our control,
Sam: Just slightly. George: But not a lot.
Sam: Not a lot
George: Not a lot Let’s try hydrogen peroxide.
Sam: Let’s try it. 10 drops of that George: Alright. Oh, you know what, again slightly better than our control.
Sam: Looks like isopropyl alcohol is the best so far.
George: Okay let’s keep going. Sam: Alright so we’ve got some salt. George: Just dump some out there
Sam: So they say to really cover it on Google tips, and then to just use your finger to rub it
in.
George: More salt captain! Seriously, could we have some more salt? Sam: Oh, I’m captain, okay got it, got it. I’ll just put a little bit of water. Now let’s see, Is there difference? No. That’s… worse.
George: Yeah, that is really worse. What’s our last one? Sam: Boiling water.
George: That had time to cool so we’ll just let it come up to the boil again. Two Minutes Later Okay our water is
boiling so let’s give this guy a test here. I’m going to cover a pipette with
paper towels so I don’t burn myself. George: Uhh…
Sam: Hmm George: So I think what I’d like to do before we draw any conclusions from this, is maybe hit it with some more of our best performer. Sam: Alright so we are gonna go all in on the isopropyl alcohol. Or that. I’m pretty impressed.
George: The stain is definitely still there, it’s not disappeared, this
isn’t magic. Sam: But it’s like a very, very light pink. George: Yeah that’s better than it was before. should we try the same with boiling water?
Sam: Yeah let’s do it. One Minute Later Sam: I wish the American Chemical
Society had elevator music in their elevators. George: That’s true we don’t have
elevator music in the elevators.
Sam: There’s nothing in the elevators. George: It’s just dead silence. What are we supposed to do in there? A Few Seconds Later We’re at a boil. Here we go. Sam: Whoa…
George: Hey it’s already kind of working. Sam: So definitely don’t have your shirt on while you do this because it is boiling
water. George: Yes. Let’s keep going. George: I think actually,
Sam: That might have just handled it. George: That might have taken care of it. Now, we didn’t douse everything else in the
other stuff, so there’s that. Sam: That’s true. We did put quite a bit of isopropyl alcohol there. George: Yeah, we put a lot of rubbing alcohol. Alright so this was the wine stain that we added boiling water to, this guy was rubbing alcohol, and it
looks like boiling water is the clear winner. Sam: Large amounts of boiling water
dissolved that wine stain really well, better than cold water, likely because
hot water has more energy, meaning its water molecules are moving more quickly
which could help break up the stain. And warmer water also increases the
solubility of substances, so that might help you pick up more wine with boiling
water compared to cold. George: Yeah all right so blood. So the things we’re gonna test to
try and get blood out of our white cotton t-shirt, include meat tenderizer, contact lens solution, hydrogen peroxide, lemon juice, and soap dish soap. So let’s
try it and see. Sam: Alright and so just like with the wine,
let’s go ahead and drop three drops. Oh, this is far more viscous okay so now we George: Okay so now we wait for five minutes to let the stain set. Five Minutes Later Sam: There are pretty intense.
George: Yeah, these look hard to get out. Sam: Yes. So we’ll start with the cold water control. Sam: Wow.
George: Oh, hey, that’s a little unexpected. It’s kind of wicking away the blood. Sam: Oh, weird.
George: It’s coming out. Sam: Yeah, I mean, I’m actually really surprised I thought there was no way that it was
gonna get almost any out. George: Yeah. And show the napkin I mean that’s clearly coming out. Well let’s move on to the next thing. What would you like to try? Sam: I want to try the lemon juice. I’m
very curious about that. George: That looks darker.
Sam: Definitely darker. Yeah this looks so dark. George: That looks really different. Well let’s get after it with some paper towels and see what happens. Yeah that looks, uh, mud brown I
guess you would say? Probably not something you want to do to your shirt.
Sam: No, I’d avoid that. George: Alright. Next up?
Sam: Let’s try that contact solution. I mean, it’s definitely got out some blood but the water still seems a bit better. Well, similar. George: I would say roughly the same.
Sam: The lemon is really bad. George: The lemon is bad. Let’s see I’m gonna start with the bubbles. Do hydrogen
peroxide. Sam: Whoa. Look at that fizz! George: That is decomposing the hydrogen
peroxide into oxygen and water. Alright, let’s see.
Sam: Okay so it still looks kind of gross, but it seems promising. George: Yeah. That is maybe the best one so far?
Sam: Yeah George: Alright so let’s do soap. Now, ten drops of dish soap seems like it would be
excessive given that you need one drop to wash an entire cast iron skillet. Now—you would never wash cast iron with dish soap that’s a terrible idea. Don’t do that.
Sam: Watch our how to wash a cast iron skillet. George: We do have a video about cast iron.
Sam: Yeah, I know! Right so we’ll rub it in and then I
think the idea is to then also add some water. George: Because without water, not much is happening here, except smearing the blood around a little bit. So
let’s add some water and see what happens. Go for it. Sam: Ahh. Alright. So definitely dish soap and hydrogen peroxide are in the lead, by far.
George: Yeah, absolutely. all right Alright, let’s finish off with meat tenderizer.
Would you hit me with a few drops? Sam: That looks really bad.
George: Yep. This is not good. This is not good. Alright, should we revisit our two best performers? Sam: Hydrogen peroxide. Even better. George: Yeah, look at that.
Sam: Wow! That’s really good. George: I have to say I’m I’m somewhat surprised. I didn’t expect it to get rid of so much of the color. Shall we revisit the dish soap?
Sam: Yeah let’s do it. George: Okay let’s add some more of that.
Sam: Also not bad. George: So I think we can call this one I would say, what, tie between the hydrogen peroxide, slight
edge to hydrogen peroxide over dish soap? Sam: Yeah, yeah.
George: Alright let’s call it. Sam: Hydrogen peroxide.
George: We just called it.
Sam: We did. Sam: So when we poured hydrogen peroxide on that blood stain it was broken down by catalase, an enzyme found in our blood.
So catalase is actually super important in our bodies because it keeps dangerous
reactive oxygen species, created by oxidizers like hydrogen peroxide, from
forming. Catalase converts hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen, and that
release of oxygen creates the fizzing you see on the shirt. That reactive
oxygen species, though, was probably responsible for oxidizing the pigments
in the blood stain, which changed them from red, to less red. George: So we’ve got our bacon grease, and for this one we are testing, what would you call this a grab bag of Internet lore?
Sam: Yeah, I think that’s an accurate description. So the ones I’m most intrigued to see how they work are hairspray and cola, but
then we also have baking soda, we’ve got some baby powder, and of course dish soap, which i think is most likely to work. George: Yeah, I think the dish soap is gonna be the clear winner here, but there is only one way to find out. We’re gonna get our bacon grease on
the shirt here, and now we wait. One Awkward Silence Later Sam: Do you sing like with a group? George: No, no, just alone in the shower. I wonder what color this is.
Sam: I mean I put it on my head right before this. George: Oh, so is it clear?
Sam: Yeah. What do you think hair spray—do you think it’s a color? [Sprays hair spray]
George: [Coughing] That was a mistake. Sam: It’s holding. George: That’s was also a mistake. Okay, five minutes are up. Control first? Sam: Yeah, control first, always. All right so we’re gonna let this dry a bit, because at first glance it looks like it could be
out, but we’ll see. I’m so excited to try this one.
George: I guess 10 drops wouldn’t be
as brown as—oh, no that’s exactly as brown as you think it’ll be.
Sam: All right, well we’ll see what it looks like when it dries. Let’s do some baking soda.
George: Okay so now you’re doing baking soda. Sam: This is baking soda.
George: That’s pretty good actually. Sam: This is not bad. I mean yeah we’ll see. Moving on. George: All right well let’s try baby powder. Sam: Oh it’s like coating it, like a thick layer. George: There’s a cakieness to it. Sam: I feel like you could just,
with your nail just peel it. George: Oh, yeah look at that, it’s kind of coming off. So we’ll do dish soap next. Sam: A little dish soap, we’ll rub it in, and then a bit of water. Sam: Oh that’s good.
George: That one is good. We might have an outright winner here. Sam: Hey George, don’t discount the hair spray.
George: Sorry, sorry, you’re right you’re right. Haven’t even tested the hair spray yet. Okay, the PS de resistance. Sam: That might not actually too bad. We gotta let it dry a little. George: So, we are gonna let this sit for about ten minutes, and come back and see what happens. A Dry T-Shirt Later All right so we took a space heater to this shirt for about ten minutes. Our control we have got a
classic grease stain. It looks honestly it looks just like a water spot,
but it’s dry, and that is grease. Cola, exactly what you would expect.
Sam: Not only do we still have a grease stain, but there’s also a dark ring around it, so don’t do that.
George: Yeah not sure why Google suggested that. Sam: Nope
George: This guy is baking soda, right? Sam: Yes. It’s not quite as bad as if you just used water, but it’s still not great. George: Yeah you can still see that
that’s noticeable. Same deal for the baby powder. That’s still a grease stain.
Sam: It’s about the same. George: Here we’ve got dish soap
and water, and I think, yeah that’s the winner so far, and I think, what, second place?
Sam: Second place actually goes to hair spray, except this shirt
is incredibly um crunchy. So I would say absolutely dish soap and water.
George: Dish soap and water. Sam: Clear winner.
George: Clear winner. Sam: Dish soap is a surfactant. Surfactants
have a water soluble head and an oil soluble tail. That allows them to form a
spherical structure around droplets of oil or grease, removing it from a surface
like our white cotton t-shirt. George: But let’s review what we found. So we’ll start with blood, what was the best there? Sam: For blood, we found that the hydrogen peroxide treatment, and then also the dish soap and water seemed to be by far the best
option. And for those, again, we really added as much as we possibly could.
George: Right, the 10 drops was not going to do it in that case. Lemon juice was terrible for blood that was not good.
Sam: Don’t use that. George: All right, wine.
Sam: So for wine, I was shocked to see, actually, that the
boiling water was what did it. So as we were pouring it you could just see the
wine I don’t know if dissipating is the right word. George: Disappear.
Sam: Disappear. But again, not while you have the shirt on do not pour scalding hot water on
yourself. George: Right. All right what about bacon? Grease. Bacon grease, not just a big
slab of bacon on your shirt. Sam: The best was dish soap and water. George: Yep.
Sam: But surprisingly the hair spray actually did pretty well.
George: Yeah, it came in second. Again, not
a close second, I would say, but still second.
Sam: Yeah still second, but it did give you a bit of a crunchy shirt, so that’s the downside. We only had so much time to go over Google’s stain removal tips, so if there are other ones
that you think are great, let us know in the comments and we’ll
George: see Sam: you
George: next
Sam: week. One Freeze Frame Later Narrator: Please do not be weird in the comments.