Tubeless Conversion on Maxxis Holy Rollers

Tubeless Conversion on Maxxis Holy Rollers


in the last month I’ve gotten quite a few frustrating pinch flats in my mountain bike it could increase the tire pressure but I’d rather just convert my bike to tube list since the main benefit is no pinch flats the last time I rode tubeless I crashed around a turn and ended up doing the walk of shame back to the trailhead I took my anger out on tubeless setups in general but the truth is that I probably could have been back up and running again had I brought a co2 so let’s give it another shot tonight we’ll be doing a tubeless conversion on my maxes holy rollers and standard non tubeless mountain bike wheels so if you’ve been reading up on Stan’s no tubes you might be saving up to three million dollars you’ll need four rim tape wheel liners valve stem sealant and injectors on the other hand if you’ve been watching bike man for you you’re digging through the trash for an old inner tube and some broken glass I like to stay somewhere in the middle of those two extremes my particular tire and rim combination has a real loose fit so I’m using some liners with valves built-in to get a tighter fit and a more reliable seal Stan’s recommends that you drill out the inner wall of your non-googlers rim with a 3/8 bit but I found that this isn’t always crucial I already did the rear wheel last night so I know that we’ll need three full wraps of Gorilla Tape around the wheel plus the rubber liner to get a tight seal building up the thickness of the original rim is a crucial step in most conversions and it’s important to do it evenly and neatly for a good seal if you can’t get your tire to seals chances are you need to build up the rim more if you’re a weight weenie you’ll be worried about adding grams of spinning weight with each wrap of tape but I don’t like to use the G word right now my main concern is stopping these pesky pinch flats so three full wraps of carefully measured gorilla tape later and I’m ready to add the rim strip a good amount of soapy water will help the rubber fall into place evenly some people claim they can do this without the soap but I’m not a fan of going in dry it’s important to make sure the rim strip is tucked under the lip of the rim all the way around and that there are no spots where the liner is stretched or thinned out it would be a shame to have to take all the apart with a sealant in so dry fitting at first will help you determine how far off you are from a perfect seal not perfect but I find that if it holds any air it’ll be fine once the seal indecision if it holds no air at all then we’ll need to add more gorilla tape under the rim strips so now we’re ready to seal this up we’ll unseat the tire at the bottom and add precisely two ounces of sealant or yeah once the sealant is in there we’ll toss the wheel around real good to coat the inside of the tire now it’s been said that you should do this with a floor pump because you need to know that the setup will be serviceable outside of a shop but there’s something really satisfying about that sound that the tire makes when it seals up so rather than cheat ourselves of that satisfying sound I’m going to use a co2 and success this one sealed up so well that actually there’s barely any sealant bubbling out I’ll let the wheel sit for a few minutes in a bunch of different positions to get the sealant everywhere but riding it is actually the best method of doing this actually since we already have soapy water and a sponge let’s do a bike wash just for the hell of it any decent mountain bike can be washed with dish soap and a sponge and then rinse lightly with a hose as opposed to blasting dirt into your bearings with a pressure washer so yeah set your host to spray not jet it’s been an hour and I don’t see any sealant bubbling out so I’d say this was a productive night thanks for watching and I’ll see you next time cat