Triathlon Bikes: Cervelo vs Specialized vs Trek vs Felt vs Giant

Triathlon Bikes: Cervelo vs Specialized vs Trek vs Felt vs Giant


– Versus Giant Bikes
versus Cervelo versus … (background noise drowns out other sounds) Oh yeah, no doubt. Don’t make eye contact,
don’t make eye contact. (upbeat music) What’s up, Trainiacs? Continuing on yesterday’s tone, if you haven’t seen that, by the way, A, make sure you subscribe, so that you don’t miss these killer videos, and B, go check it out right there. I wanna talk about Felt
bikes versus Giant Bikes versus Cervelo versus
Specialized versus Trek, and why thus far, I have
chosen to ride Cervelo. Now, the way that I look
at these five companies, is there’s basically three groups. In the first group, I’m gonna
lump Felt and Giant together. I understand that those companies are very aggressively
trying to buy market share by lowering the prices of their bikes. That said, also what I hear, is that when these companies are pressed for more data on the
testing and the engineering that goes into their bikes,
it’s a little bit lacking. Now, does that mean
that it’s a worse bike? Don’t know. I have heard a few more stories, though, of say Giant’s being not nearly as stiff and Felt occasionally having defects. Now, also, that said, I have heard that these companies very quickly step up to the plate to fix
these problems when they happen, so you can get into these
bikes for a lower price point, knowing that there might
be a little bit of hassle in the quality of the bike,
but they do stand behind it. Now, the Felt IA10 in the
2017 model costs 6500 dollars, Canadian dollars, IE, Monopoly money, and with that, you get deep
section training wheels, however, they are still heavy, they aren’t gonna be your
primary racing wheels, but you get electronic shifting with Di2. The Giant Trinity Advanced
Pro Number 1 2017 model is 5299, with that you get
outright training wheels, not even deep, and Ultegra Di2. Not to say that we wanna
kinda normalize things across the board and
assume that a proper set of racing wheels is gonna cost you anywhere between about a thousand
and two thousand dollars, and that we want to get everything to the same spec mechanical group of Di2, which ends up costing in between, again, one and two thousand dollars. That gets the Felt to about 7500 dollars and the Giant to around 7299. Now, the second group in this list is where Cervelo slots
in, and in my opinion, those are the companies that
spend a fair bit on research, but their bikes aren’t
wildly over expensive, and in this group I put Cervelo and Trek. These are the companies that when reps start getting questioned about the process of designing a bike, the aerodynamics, the research that’s put into it, the engineering, the layout, the process of getting a bike into people’s
arms and under their crotch, they put a lot of effort into it, but they’re not just gouging you through the nose with the cost, and the bikes that I looked at with them is the Trek Speed Concept
7.5 2017 model, and for that, all you get is training
wheels and SRAM Force. Level that out with a set of race wheels and Di2 electronic
shifting gets you to 8299, about a thousand dollars more than the Felt and the Giant. The Cervelo P3 Altegra, granted
this is 2016, costs 5999. For that, you get training wheels, but you get electronic shifting with Di2, level that out and you come to 7999. Now, the last group in this list is where Specialized slots
in, and this is the group of companies that I think
are probably overpriced, but at least they put a ton
of research into their bikes, and the reason that I say this, is anytime that I’ve tried
to compare bike for bike and match up the specs, like for instance, when I was buying the Cervelo S3 Roadbike, I was comparing it to a Specialized Venge, and when I matched it up
as closely as possible, for some reason, the
Specialized was about a thousand to fifteen hundred dollars more. Now, granted they do a ton
of work in the wind tunnel, they’re fairly revolutionary
on the road bike game, but they are dialing back
a lot on the tri-game. I understand that when they go to the road bike announcements and get asked about
tri-bikes, they’re like, “Oh, yeah, uh, we’ve still
got the Shiv over there, uh, yeah, it’s gonna come
out in the 2017 model.” But there’s really not a lot happening. I take this to mean that Specialized is willing to be in the tri-game, but as long as they’re getting paid some mad cheddar for it, yo. A 2016 Specialized Shiv
Ultegra with aero wheels and Dura-Ace Di2, basically,
if you aren’t getting the best of the best, don’t even show up. However, it costs ten
thousand dollars in Canada. So, look at those three bike companies and where they slot into each other. Felt and Giant are probably
going to be the least expensive, but do you know if their research and their quality is there? Trek and Cervelo are
gonna be probably around a thousand to fifteen hundred
dollars more expensive, but you know that they’ve
put a ton of research into that bike, and you rarely hear of anyone having a problem
with those two brands. Specialized, however, sell your children, and that’s why I have tended
to lean towards Cervelo over the last few years, because I know that they’ve put a lot
of research into it, it’s a quality bike, but
between Cervelo and Trek, it’s just slightly
cheaper, and it’s formerly a Canadian company, and
it was the first tri-bike that I got, and you know
what, they broke the mold, I think literally as far
as tri-bikes are concerned. So, I’m a fan. Speaking of breaking, this
morning’s swim nearly broke me. It broke me mentally, I’ll say that. It was a floaty pants day, if there’s ever been a floaty pants day. (upbeat music) Did not feel good. I knew this day would come,
where I’m at in the training is a bit of a dark place. So, you know how body builders, they do, like say ten to 12 bicep curls, and what they’re doing, is
those first eight to ten, is really just to fatigue the muscle and it get it almost to failure, and then those last two where
they’re just like (screams), those are actually the
reps that are causing the damage that make them stronger, and build that muscle back up. You need to get yourself to the point of like just past what
your body’s capable of to get faster, stronger,
and then it’s like woah, holy smokes, I need to step it up a notch if he’s gonna do this to me, or she. Now, endurance training is kinda the same. You need to push yourself
within a workout, but also, what you need to be doing, is within your plan,
basically pushing yourself into a little bit of fatigue, but just shy of beating yourself down. So, let’s say one is you’re
sitting on the couch. Ten is you are just smashing yourself beyond your physical
limits every single day. You wanna kinda edge up
to maybe that nine and ten for a little bit a few days, feel really deep down, and then back off. Well, I’m right there. You know things are off when your biceps are starting to cramp just from swimming, just from existing in the water, and I knew that at some point, it was gonna take a turn
from Oh, smash that work out, feeling good, feeling strong,
making gains, getting faster, changing to, “I hate you, Coach Pat.” I mean, I don’t, but I say that, and it just feels good
to say that some days. Right on the edge of getting
in that deep dark hole. (background noise drowns out other sounds) You hear that? Coach Pat said I might get tomorrow off. Don’t make eye contact,
don’t make eye contact. You know what, it’s these times that actually make you
stronger, unfortunately. Getting yourself right
to that breaking point, like edging up on what
your body is capable of, then you add in a taper, some rest, then you come back
feeling like a superhero, ideally, that’s the plan at least. We will try, Trainiacs, we will try.