Top 7 Winter Cycling Mistakes

Top 7 Winter Cycling Mistakes


In the summer, you can get away with a mistake or two
when you’re out on a ride. Just lay down and sunbathe and wait for someone to come to the rescue. But in the winter months when it’s colder, you really wanna make
sure you get things right. Yeah, so coming up are GCN’s tips on how to avoid winter riding mistakes. The first and the most obvious mistake is not wearing enough clothing, or at least not wearing
the correct clothing, and therefore getting cold and wet. And winters are generally cold and wet. If they’re not where you are, we maintain you only have winters in name, not in nature. We’ve got some good news for you. Modern cycling clothing is so good that staying warm doesn’t mean looking like the Michelin Man. These days you shouldn’t
need more than a base layer, and a thermal jersey up top until it gets below freezing point. A skull cap always comes in handy to keep your head and your ears warm, and some modern winter shoes like these will keep your feet warm and snug. and often negate the need for overshoes, and don’t forget to take with you in your back pocket, another layer. It could be a gilet, but we generally take with us
a nice rain jacket like this. You just never know what the
weather will throw at you. An equally easy mistake to make is the complete opposite. And that’s wearing too much clothing. That’s right. It is tempting to want
to feel nice and cozy as soon as you leave the door. But the reality is that if
you’re immediately warm, you’re soon going to be cooking. We’ve all been there mate. I’m boiling. So actually what you should feel is quite chilly for the first few minutes of a very cold winter’s ride. Don’t worry though, after a little while you’ll soon warm up once your body starts making its own heat. God I’m boiling. Here’s one that we’re
sometimes guilty of ourselves. And that’s a lack of visibility. The more you stand out
as a cyclist, the better. So, aim to wear bright clothing and always have lights
on, even during daylight. There’s really no excuse these days. With a whole load of affordable lights that are really bright and some bright clothing that looks cool too. Despite indoor training
advancing light years in terms of entertainment
over the last few years, there are still people who will avoid it at all costs. Unfortunately, that can mean they put themselves in danger out on the open road. Most the time, if you
wanna brave the elements when it’s cold and it’s wet that’s fine, but if there’s any ice, we’d advise that you give it a miss altogether. Definitely, it’s just not worth it. You are effectively gambling with the prospect of weeks or maybe
even months off the bike, for the sake of missing
one day out on the road. Want some mate? You run out? No, I’m fine mate. You might need it. Go on then. I just don’t feel as thirsty. Admittedly, you don’t
need to drink as much as when it’s sweltering hot,
but you’ll still be sweating, even when it’s cold. And also losing fluid through your breath, so make sure you replace them. We have read studies
which suggest that your body burns more calories
to keep itself cool in the summer than it does to keep itself warm in the winter. But, it is our own personal experience which suggests you need
to eat more in the winter to prevent the dreaded knock. Yeah, so make sure you
take some food with you out on your ride and some money as well. And make sure you keep
eating at regular intervals. Because there’s something about blowing up in the winter versus
blowing up in the summer that is even more horrible. Now don’t worry, we are
not going to suggest that you completely stop stopping a mid-winter ride at a nice cafe for sociable chat. But there is distinct
risk in the winter months. You’re going to get cold. Maybe not in the cafe itself, but certainly when you resume your ride. But we have a handy
little solution for you. And it’s this, something I
used to do back in the day, is carry a spare undervest with you wrapped up in a plastic bag. That way, when you get to the caf, you can pop to the bathroom, take off your soggy wet undervest, and
replace it with a nice new one. Leaving you warm and toasty
in your exit from the caf. Good advice. Let’s face it though. It takes absolutely hammering
it down you’re right. You’ve really got to
question whether or not it’s worth stopping mid-ride. I thought we weren’t gonna stop them stopping at cafs. It’s for the viewer’s own good. We’ve got to be honest with them. Fair enough Dan. Anyway, if you haven’t already subscribed to the Global Cycling Network, you can do so for free
by clicking on the globe somewhere in the middle of the screen. If you’ve enjoyed this video give it a thumbs up just down below, and then we’ve got two more videos related to winter riding. First up, just down here are a load of motivational tips if
you’re struggling to get out. Meanwhile just down here is a very scientific explanation into exactly how effective mud guards are. Fenders that is.
Mud guards. Fenders.