Tips & Tricks To Avoid Crashing On Your Mountain Bike | GMBN’s Crash Course Ep. 2

Tips & Tricks To Avoid Crashing On Your Mountain Bike | GMBN’s Crash Course Ep. 2


(explosions) – Welcome to episode two of Crash Course, where I take a look at the
crashes you lot have been having, try and spot why it went wrong to stop you eating it like this. (crashes) (man yells) But before we get into it,
make sure you subscribe and hit that little bell icon over there so you get a notification
every time we make an upload. (whoosh) First video has been sent in by Ruben in sunny South Africa, check this out. This is his friend Daniel,
wow, it’s a big one. And anyone’s who’s had
that horrible feeling of getting bucked over the bars on a jump just knows how horrible this is. Well I’m not in sunny South Africa, but I am in sunny-ish South
Wales, in BikePark Wales, and I’ve got a little jump over there, and hopefully I can show
you why this went wrong. First let’s look at the actual
ramp, the take off the jump. It looks to me like it’s quite kicky. By that I mean that it’s
quite a short take off, it’s quite steep, so that
when you hit it, actually, it’s almost like hitting a wall, it’s going to try and slow you down, and that can start throwing
the weight forward. So it’s not always your technique, sometimes actually the
jump isn’t built that well. Got a good example here of
quite a nice, mallow take off, but when you hit it at speed, it is going to send you
up and into the air. But let’s go full slow-mo, see what’s going on
with the body position. (jazzy rock music) Right now I think, to
me it looks more obvious than slow motion if you
pause it on the take off, see Daniel is actually stood up. When the bike is actually just
starting to get into the air, front wheel’s up into the air, but Daniel’s already stood up. So what he’s trying to do there is actually lift the bike up into the air. It’s a really common one with jumping, where people feel like they want
to just launch straight away, but actually what you need to do is launch one wheel at a time. So front wheel, and then
what you need to do is pause and stay in quite low
to the back of the bike, all the way until the rear wheel
gets to the top of the jump and then you stand up and forward. So basically you’re
helping the front wheel go into the air, and then the back one, and you should then get
a nice sort of launch so the bike follows a
nice curve in the air, rather than the front wheel
going up into the air, and then the weight going up, stood up, ’cause that is then sending
the back wheel up already. So the back wheel’s not
used much at the jump, but it can still send
all the weight forward, and that’s the big problem here. (jazzy music) Next one comes from
Wesley in Ballantine Park, who’s trying to ride
his very first wall ride from end to end and he says
he doesn’t have enough speed. Well yeah, you’ve said it already, you didn’t have enough speed there. So you need quite a lot of speed sometimes to stick to a wall ride,
so you need that force. But also what you can do if you realize you haven’t quite got enough speed, when you’re half way around it, you can try and pop off early, so it’s definitely down
to a bit of experience, this, doing lots of wall rides, but in this case you could have done that, you could have just
carved, as you slow down, carve a bit more of a corner, and then do a little manual to come off that wall ride early. Don’t forget that if it’s
wet it’s going to make that wood much slipperier as well. (guitar music) Talk about wood being
slippery when it’s wet, well Dan finds out the hard way here. If you’re offline, if the
trail is a bit off-camber, or if you’re trying to make
a big corner on wet wood, then just take it very easy. Ideally you try and not ride it when it’s super slippery like this, but sometimes you will,
just be really careful, ’cause making a corner
like this is almost always going to end in a crash. – [Man] Oh that’s slick. (beep) (man yells) – This one is sent in by David, and this is in Maydena
Bike Park in Tasmania, but it’s really muddy, and
this is his friend Spud. It’s always the friend
that falls off, isn’t it? And a good name for him, Spud, ’cause he tries to bury himself
back in the ground here. Some pretty good body
surfing down the trail, but as you can see, Spud didn’t quite have
it nailed, as he’d hoped. Really this drop is
too big to try and roll in that situation, so at that speed, you’re going to need to
do something like a manual to keep your front wheel
up so you don’t get sent straight over the bars, or, possibly go a bit faster,
but you can’t always do that, because if it’s super muddy like that, you can end up being too
fast and out of control. So let’s look at going nice
and slow and doing a manual. (jazzy music) Well there’s a couple of different
ways thinking about this, but you should end up in the same position to the back of the bike with really your weight off the front wheel. So the first one is
just getting to the edge of the drop and doing a manual. So you’re down and back,
nice to the back of the bike, front wheel goes light, don’t
go over the bars, hopefully. Or the other way is wait
until you get to the edge and then just simply
slide the bike forward. You’ll end up to the back of the bike, nice and safe position, and your front wheel should stay light. Anything to really be aware of is not going too low and
hitting that back tire, ’cause that’s going to
stall the bike completely, and that can send you
over the bars as well. ‘Cause also if you’re high, and then your speed stops for any reason, your momentum stops,
all that weight is then going forward towards the bars. (jazzy piano music) This one is sent in by Brayden
from Bowling Green in K-Y, which I presume is Kentucky. This is his friend again tried this jump and didn’t keep his foot on his pedals and hit the ground, and
his bike pretty hard, but he got up and walked
away without any injuries, which is good news. What I would say, from
my point of view though, it wasn’t the foot coming
off that caused the crash, that was definitely part of it, but I think the crash was caused
by not taking off straight. It’s really important on a jump like that to try and look to where you’re going so that you ride off the
take off either straight, or sometimes turning,
but you need to be aiming for where you’re going. It looks to me like
there’s a bit of a pull, and the bike goes sideways, and then your friend tries
to pull with his feet to try and straighten the bike up and that’s when the foot comes
off, and the crash happens. But also if you look, the front wheel doesn’t
land until the flat, so really with something like this you’re aiming to sort of, what I call butter it into the landing, so you go front wheel then back wheel into that landing, so
that if your front wheel is slightly sideways it
lands as early as possible, and it can straighten up. If the front wheel
doesn’t land all the way til the bottom, and it’s sideways, then you’re probably
always going to crash. (upbeat acoustic music) For this example I’m going
to be coming into this quite fast, it’s quite a big jump, and there is a corner, you
can see it’s a big berm there, so what I try and do is
do of my cornering there, hit this take off as straight as possible, but as you can see, it is a slight hip, I do need to be turning
a little bit in the air to the right to get on that landing, but it’s just a real case of looking to where you need to be,
turning on the take off, and carrying on that
bit of a hip in the air. By hip I just mean corner in
the air with my body weight and the bike, and landing,
like I said before, front wheel then back wheel,
on all of that landing. Keep sending us your
crashes using the uploader, there’s a link in the description down below this video to that. Stick them in the fails and bails bit and we use them in the dirt shed, sometimes on Instagram and use them here, and I’ll try and help you out. More of these videos coming soon. If you want to see a video
on how to nail your jumps, over there, if you’re dropped, over there, thumbs up if you liked this video, cheers.