The Win Tunnel: Tidy Up Your Triathlon Bike

The Win Tunnel: Tidy Up Your Triathlon Bike


CHRIS YU: So one of
the big questions that we get a lot is, how
do you set up your tri bike for carrying all
the stuff that you need to do whatever
distance triathlon? And we’ve all seen those
photos of the bikes in T1 where there’s stuff
just taped everywhere. So what we’re going to
do now is Mark’s going to set up his bike
for a half Ironman, and we’re going to go through
a couple of different ways that you could store all
the stuff that you’ll need. So Mark, what do you need
for your half Ironman? MARK COTE: Well,
it’s pretty common. Everybody does it a
little bit different. So we’ll do a little
bit of a mix here. But this is a hot half Ironman. I’m going to carry three
bottles, one big one, two smaller ones. I’m going to carry
all the spare gear I need in case I get a flat. So I’m going to
run clinchers now. Clinchers are super,
super fast these days. Great rolling
distance and narrow. So a tube, a CO2 and
a head or a pump. We’ll use a pump in this case. A spare CO2, which
I carry for karma because if somebody else gets
a flat on the side of the road, you give it away. It’s awesome. Tire lever, a four mil
because something’s always rattling or can happen. And then from a
nutrition standpoint, a banana, just to have
regular food in your stomach before the run is critical. Four gels, some Cliff block. CHRIS YU: We’re doing
two comparisons. The first is, what would most
triathletes typically do? So nutrition taped
across the top tube, spares bundled up and
taped onto the seat post, and three bottles and their
different cage positions. And the second one is a slightly
more integrated approach. In the case of the Shiv,
which we have here, we’re using the fuel cell
in the front triangle to hold all the nutrition
as well as all the spares. And one of the bottles is now
in the integrated fuselage hydration system. So all this stuff is kind
of more cleanly tucked away, and we’re going to
take a look at what that drag difference is. All right. So we just ran that comparison
with Mark and his set up. And the data is in. It was a huge difference. So between the traditional
set up with everything taped on the bike to
something a little bit more integrated– even though
the stuff is all there, and visually, it may not have
looked like a humongous change, it was a 7%, roughly
a 7% drop in drag. MARK COTE: And that’s all drag. That’s bike, rider, helmet,
all the stuff going on. CHRIS YU: Which is huge. And translated into time
over our standard 40 kilometer distance, that
represents roughly a 77, 76-ish second savings,
which is pretty big. A lot of you guys
are always asking about what you can do to
make your set up faster and get a little lower
times out on course. This is one of
those things where it’s either free or
nearly free, so it’s a really good bang
for your buck upgrade. MARK COTE: And
really, if we look at what that’s kind of
equivalent to, what we just saved in time there,
that’s like upgrading to a nice set of aero wheels
versus just kind of your stock wheels. So that’s a pretty
big deal overall. Now obviously, we looked
at this on my Shiv, but it’s something you
can do on pretty much any bike, road bike, time
trial, triathlon bike, whatever it may be. If it looks clean and looks
tidy, it probably is more aero. The less stuff that you
have hanging out there, the faster you’re going to go. CHRIS YU: Absolutely. So again, if you guys have
any more questions that you’d like us to take a
look at in here, please send them out
through Facebook or Twitter. #aeroiseverything. Thanks.