The Best Training For Weight Loss? | Ask GCN Anything

The Best Training For Weight Loss? | Ask GCN Anything


– Welcome to this week’s Ask GCN Anything. – Coming up this week,
we talk electric cars. – Yes, and VO2 max. – And, how to become a pro. – If you’d like to get
in on next week’s show, then use the hashtag #Torqueback, and what was the other one Chris? – #AskGCNtraining to be in
with a chance of winning that free 3-month subscription to Zwift. – Yeah, I reckon we should get
answering some questions, eh? – Yep, let’s go! (dramatic sounds) – Right Chris, who’s first up? – First up is Saturnio
Owens who writes in with: Hey guys, I’m looking
to go from casual riding to slightly more serious and
get my first bike computer. How exactly can I use that
to improve my training? A lot of workouts seem
to rely on power meters. – Right, if you do have a power meter now, and you’ve got a head unit to go with it, then it’s ultimately
a great training tool. You can set your zones and
you’ll be able to really set your training so you’ll be
getting more out of yourself, which will actually really
bring you on from, you know, amateur to trying to get to a pro. If you don’t yet have a
power meter then you can use that head unit to follow your
cadence or your heart rate, or even your speed and
this will also help you to really push to another level, and push you a little bit further. And you’ll also be able
to use all that data to analyze your training
once you’ve done it. – But fear not, if you are
just gonna be riding on feel and using your head unit
to track the distance that you’ve covered or the
hours that you’ve made, it’s alright because we’ve
got a brilliant video – We do – On the channel on how to train on feel, and it really does work,
really well, actually. – Yep. (dramatic whooshing sounds) – The winner of this week’s
3-months free subscription from Zwift is: – Dreamer! – Yes, it is. – Who writes in, with, I
do roughly 40 miles a day, 4 days a week, but really
struggle with losing weight, and I also love sprinting
which seems to turn my fat into muscle. What Zwift training session
do you recommend I do to help lose weight? – Right, first off, great
question, and as always we send this question off
to Zwift, and they come back with the answer. So they’ve come up with this: Firstly, you’re actually
achieving a really good level and a really good base,
doing the 40 miles per day for 4 days, and there’s only a
few things you need to change to help you get your weight loss target. – Yep, but first off,
you should consider all of your nutritional choices. I mean, all of us could most of the time, make better choices when
it comes to nutrition. But, if you are going to
be making any changes, you need to make sure that they’re going to be sustainable over
a long period of time, because everything in
moderation works best. – Yep. And with this in mind, maybe think about honing in on one piece of your diet to take out, so for example,
I’m a big fan of chocolate. – Oh yeah. – Don’t know if you are, yeah,
so I would look at taking the chocolate out of my diet,
but then make sure you’re only doing one part of
your diet, because you want to make it sustainable. If you end up taking out
all your treats this is just not gonna be
sustainable and you’ll end up wanting to gorge on loads of
food and that’s not gonna help. – Yep, and then the next
thing you wanna look at is actually trying to maximize
the amount of calories that you burn whilst
you’re out on the bike, and a great way to do this would be to do um, carb cycling, effectively. So, if you’re gonna go out
and do an easy 40 miles, you probably don’t
actually need to eat a load of carbohydrate, and in fact, why not try and do it with no carbohydrate beforehand, maybe just a few eggs,
avocado, that sort of thing. If you really need
something when you’re out on the bike, after an
hour then you can start to top up your energy stores,
but try and keep it low carb. – Yeah, so for example, that
strategy we’re implementing is that low-carb strategy for
the longer endurance rides, – The easy rides. – And then for those
high-intensity rides we wanna look at maybe a high-carb
strategy, so maybe have some carbs 60 minutes before
a really hard Zwift session. And that way, you’ll be fueling up for those high intensity
sessions and underfueling for those low, easy rides. – Yep, definitely, that’ll
make a big difference. And then finally, research
has actually shown that by breaking your
efforts down into a total workload around 5 to 7 minutes is one of the most effective ways
to boost your metabolism and actually burn of fat, so it’s a load of small, short, sharp intervals. – Yeah, Zwift actually
have some really good sessions for you to get stuck into. And it’s on the Zwift
Academy 2018 programs, and over there you’ll see
the Under Ones program, as the name suggests
everything’s under 1 minute. They range from 10 to 30 seconds and all that really hard workout
is done under 5 minutes. So that way you’ll really
get that VO2 session going and those are really
good sessions to do with your high carb strategy. So try and implement all
those things and hopefully you’ll see a big drop in your weight loss but you know, a good drop. – Yep, it’s not gonna
happen over night, give it a good 6-10 weeks and then let us know how you’re getting on. – And next question,
we have from Zak Swan. I’m 13 years old, I want to
be a pro when I am older. How do I get there? Right, what would you say to start with? – Lots and lots of bike racing basically. So you wanna join your
local club and then see what they advise from
there, and then if they say, yeah there’s a race coming
up on such and such a day, you definitely want to
get involved with that. Closed-circuit racing is
a brilliant way to start, some track racing maybe,
or some Cyclocross. Basically, try and cover as
many different disciplines as you can, because this will make you a more rounded bike rider. – Yeah I would just add,
really important, to you know, get involved in the local
clubs and maybe a quick Google search just to find
which one’s closest to you. That way you can find people
that are close to your area that you can train with,
meet like-minded people, and also be able to
talk to them to find out where’s the local closed
circuit road race, or where is the local Cyclocross race, and this really helps you
get into the community, and it will really bring you on, yeah. – Yep. – And just keep working at it
because you will get there. – Yeah, race and learn, race and learn. But the most important
thing to do is to enjoy your bike riding. – Yep. – If you wanna be a pro,
you’re gonna be spending so many hours on a bike,
if you don’t enjoy it, it’s just not worth it. – Hundred percent. So good luck with it,
and please let us know how you get on in the
comment section below. And also, what club you
choose, that’ll be interesting. – Yep. – Right, next question we
have, from Fireblade2681. – Ooh, with asthma and hay
fever seemingly ubiquitous in the Peloton, why is there
no discussion about making all the vehicles in a race electrical? Cyclists must be gulping
in airfuls of pollution which is a leading contributor
to asthma, hay fever, and other diseases like cancer. Also, why do pro cyclists
motor pace behind petrol bikes? I don’t understand why you’d want to stick their respiratory nozzle up an exhaust. Are pro cyclists’ health and
wellbeing being neglected? Pollution is an invisible killer. Is it a case of out of sight, out of mind? Would it be logistically
possible to mandate that all vehicles following
the pro Peloton be electric? – Right, really interesting
question, and I did do a lot of research but
I don’t have asthma so, have you got any insight into the asthma? – Well, one thing I would
say is that over the years, with the introduction
of catalytic converters and cleaner engines, that
actually the fumes coming out the back of vehicles
is much less severe than they were years ago. When I started I used to
treat my asthma all the time. – Mhm. – But, actually the most
important factor when in a bunch is that you’re not actually
anywhere near vehicles at all. And the um, the pollution
that you’re breathing in from the center of a
bunch in a bike race is so minimal that in fact,
it’s negligible as to what effects it’s actually having on you. – Yeah, and it, cycling
is very, a traditional, you know, historic sport. We’ve always had petrols,
petrol cars since the start of you know, the history of cycling. And it hasn’t really
become the electric new era of road racing. – No, it’s like an oil tanker,
isn’t it, it’s slow moving. – It is, it’s very slow
moving, and I don’t think there’s electric cars that, you know, have enough miles in the car,
without charging them up, – No, exactly. – to be able to wait for two hours. I mean you can’t go and do a 240K race and then wait for a couple of hours while you’re charging before
you’ve got the transfer. – Yeah, exactly. That’s the trouble, it’s the transfer. So you might travel an hour
and a half before the start, you might then travel for
five hours during the stage, and you’ve got another
couple of hours afterwards, – But the– – but at the moment, the
range isn’t that great. – Yeah, but I would say,
as the electric cars get better and more efficient,
then I think we will see electric cars in the pro
Peloton in the future. But I just don’t think yet. But then again, saying that, EF, Education First, did
have a Tesla at the uh, RideLondon-Surrey classic last year. – Ooh. – Yeah. – Maybe it’s a sign of things to come. – Yeah, keep your eyes
peeled cause it’s gonna be an interesting one. – We got a question in
here from Will Budge: I’m going off a winter
of FTP improvement with a lot of work done on Zwift. How can I improve my VO2 max ready for the coming race season? – Great work this winter
Will, and those FTP hours will certainly improve your
performance out on the road. But your VO2’s going to be the
icing on the cake, isn’t it? – Yes, it is. – It’s gonna be those
race-winning intervals. And we’ve got a brilliant
video on the channel with Si and Dan actually
which will help talk you through what you need to do to try and really raise your VO2 max. – Yeah, keep working at
it because ultimately those are your race winning efforts. So yeah, go hard or go home. – The reason why your VO2
max is so important is that oxygen is vital in
helping your body turn fuel into energy. So therefore, the more oxygen that you can actually get in, the
more efficiently you can turn fuel into energy,
so therefore the longer and harder you can exercise for. And that’s probably the
reason why some people try and artificially boost
their VO2 max by using ill-gotten methods. – I’ve got some good news, Si. – Yeah? – You don’t need to dope
to increase your VO2 max. – Oh, that’s a relief. – I’ve also got some bad news. – What’s that? – To increase it naturally is
really gonna hurt quite a lot. – That’s not bad news
mate, no pain no gain. – Next question comes
in from Corey Ireland. – I see what you did there. – Wait, wait, wait for it
you’ll understand in a sec. When is the appropriate
time in a week to be incorporating off-the-bike
workouts like core, – Ooh. – exercises? Easy days, hard days, recovery days, or does it even matter? – Well Corey, we think that
actually any day’s alright, but we recommend doing
core exercises on your slightly shorter or
easier days on the bike because you’ll have more energy
left over to put into them. And if you were to take
on any strength training at all then we recommend
doing these before an easy day or a rest day as you’re likely to feel a little bit stiff and
a little bit dead after them. – Bang on, Chris, and
I would say check out this video, because Emma runs
you through some actually really tough core exercises
that I’ve tried but failed. – Number one, this is what
I call a Swiss ball burpee. – [Female Speaker] The
starting position is a plank with your feet flexed on the
ball, body in one straight line from heels to shoulders. Don’t arch your back or sag in the middle. The burpee is three separate movements. First, a leg tuck, rolling
the ball slowly towards you, keeping your backside nice and low. Then, roll it back to plank position. Second, hinge at the hips,
keeping your legs straight, to roll the ball towards
you and slowly return to the plank. Finally, a press-up, returning
to plank to start again. Complete the whole
sequence ten times through, then rest for 2 minutes and try again. – Next question comes in from who, Chris? – Next up is Nathan Bilham. Hey GCN, I’ve started getting into cycling as I’m training for a
triathlon and cycling always interested me. I’m quite fit in general
from all my running. What would be the best
way to get into cycling, because I don’t even know where to start. Intermediate, or slow? Do you have any videos to watch in order to get better, basically,
because fixing a puncture for the fist time the
other day blew my mind. – Wow, well, we do have
a whole host of videos on the channel, so just
go through the how-tos. We’ve got ones from fixing
punctures to riding descents, to cornering, to pretty much anything. So yeah, go and have a
rumble through those. – Yep, enjoy, you’ll be there for a while. – Next question comes in
from Tim Bla, like that. When should I stop winter base training and transition to the speed HIIT workouts? HIIT stands for High
Intensity Interval Training. – Training, good work James. Um, we recommend actually
a good four to eight weeks before your first race, but,
actually, there’s no reason not to do that sort of training throughout the entire winter, as
long as it’s periodized and well structured, you should
never neglect the intensity. – Exactly. – Next question comes in
from Laurence Deverson. – Who intends to participate
in Hill Climb event which is 24 kilometers long. Ooh, that sounds pretty tough. With a six percent average gradient with pitches up to 11% gradient. I have a full time job
with occasional overtime. How can I squeeze in the training and what type of training should I do for the hill climb? – Intervals, intervals, intervals. – Yep. – Jump on the Turbo, 45
minutes, it makes the most of that short period of
time so maybe after work or even at a lunch time,
or even before work. And then you can get some
really hard sessions in that will really bring you
on in leaps and bounds. – Yep focus on your
aerobic capacity by redoing those long 10, 12, 20 minute efforts and that will really boost your ability. – Yeah, good luck with
those, do let us know how you get on in that hill
climb in the comments below. – You gonna pronounce that next name? – Uh, mm, no. Uh, how can I overcome fear
of falling at zero speed? – Ooh, well, spending time on the bike and getting more confident and comfortable on the bike is the most important thing that you can do to become
confident and comfortable on, well, at any speed, basically. – Yeah, just spend time. It just takes time. – Make up a little obstacle
course for yourself and have a little bit of fun with it. Because cycling should be fun. So find a car park and
practice a few skills, try and turn around in a
parking bay for example, that sort of thing. – Yep, next question Chris? – Right, Markus Unneberg, Hi GCN crew. I’m 20 years old and the
coming summer I’m riding the Giro delle Dolomiti with my father. I completed, I competed
in cycling until I was 16 but pursued other endurance
sports until I was 19. After having time off the
saddle for these years, what is the best way of
training for this event? And, so I can beat my dad? Can’t wait to hear from you. – Right, great event, and
this event is 6 days long so maybe stringing some
days together will really help you get that
periodization of you know, using, being able to
ride, you know, one day after the other. – Yep, back-to-back sessions
is really important for this. And also try and build
up your endurance so aim for the three to four to five
hour rides over a weekend, and then throw in some
efforts in the week. You want to be able to get, you want to get comfortable,
basically, at riding really, really hard for 40 to 60 minutes
at a time, in the climbs. – Yes, for sure. And, next question comes
in from Ondra Stehlik II. After finishing a ride,
what should I do first, stretching or eating? – Ooh, that’s a good one. And one that I used to combine, actually, and do them both at the same time. – Really? – Yeah. – So you used to do like,
maybe, go to the splits to eat your food? – Well, look, imagine I had
like, a bit of coffee here. – Yeah. – Well, not coffee but a bowl of porridge or a bowl of protein or whatever. Protein powder, porridge,
you can stand there, you get your little spoon. – Oh, that’s quite clever,
see, I used to just well, stretch and then eat. – But, it’s like– – I guess that makes me quite boring. – Mm, yeah, but if you came
home from training wet and cold, the first thing you should
do is get warm and dry. – Good point, have a shower as well. – Ooh, Unknownoriginboc. – Right, I just finished
the VO2 max interval that I led actually. The ending was a five
minute sweet spot interval that was quite horrid,
yeah, I’m sorry about that. I found that quite horrid, too. You talked about how it was more mental. Do you have any tips to
improve your mental fortitude? Do you have any tips Chris? – Get really motivated, really focused on what goal you’re trying to achieve. Music really worked well for
me so if I have music on, when I was training I always found that was more motivating
to really hit the target that I was trying to set myself. And then where do you
wanna go with that fitness? When I was training it
was because I was trying to win bike races so that
really really spurred me on and made me dig that little bit deeper. – Yeah, really good point. So either put on some TV or
some music videos or whatever, just to kind of make you not think about the pain you’re suffering, and then yeah, just think
about that eventual goal like Chris said. – Goals, all about goals, right. Bisley Bob, hi GCN. I recently got a bargain
on a sweet new jersey. Fits great and looks the part. However, there is one problem: it doesn’t have the rubber
gripper along the hem, so it rides up my back
a bit as I’m cycling. Do you have any hacks on how
to get that hem gripping? I’ve considered blobs from a hot glue gun- (laughing) – Um, seems like a recipe for disaster. – Yes!
– What do you think? – That is going to be
a recipe for disaster. Just don’t do that. Ah, maybe um, I mean,
as I was reading that, as you were reading that
question I was thinking, maybe some electrical tape? – Yeah, I’ve got a better idea. How about stitching a
little piece of Velcro into the top of your shorts, and then the other piece
of Velcro that hooks into the bottom of your jersey, and just attach them to each other. – That’s quite a good idea. – Be really easy to do as well. – Yeah, try that, there’s a hack for you. – And the last question
comes in from Helicase21. What are some good workouts to do the day after I do a hard leg session at the gym? Weighted lunges, weighted
squats, box jumps, and a core workout, ouch,
sounds really painful. – Ooh, I’d probably spend the whole day in bed if I was you. But if you’ve got energy to
burn, then why not start off by doing our 15-20 minute
progressive workout that we’ve got on the channel. And if you’re still
feeling good after that, move into some high cadence work, so 100 to 110 RPM for 3
to 5 minutes at a time, with a similar uh, rest period in between. And the intensity you wanna aim for is around 80-85% of your
sustainable threshold power, so what you would maintain
for about an hour. – That sounds like a good session. – Yeah, good luck with that. – And on that note, I
think we should finish this week’s Ask GCN Anything,
cause that’s inspired me to go and get training myself. – Nice. – If you have enjoyed
the show then make sure you give it a big thumbs up. And if you want to get
involved in next week’s show, then use the hashtag #Torqueback and – To be in with a chance
of winning that free three-month subscription to Zwift, use the hashtag #AskGCNtraining! – Yeah, and if you’re inspired
to watch another video, then why don’t you check out this cracker just over there? – Yeah, but before you do
that, check out the shop where you can get your hands
on some of these jumpers. – Yeah, I forgot about the jumper, Chris. – Well, finally we’re
not wearing the same one. – Yeah, finally.