The Best Money Saving Hacks For MTB Maintenance: Part 2

The Best Money Saving Hacks For MTB Maintenance: Part 2


– Back again with a whole
number of hacks and bodges that are pretty cheap to do
and a whole number of top tips that are gonna save you money. (mellow music) Goggles and mountain biking, go together like tea and biscuits. But what happens when
your lenses get scratched? You throw ’em in the bin, don’t you? No, don’t do that. Save yourself some cash and
do something cool with ’em. I’ve got these old goggle lenses here, pretty scratched up, save
them for a rainy day. So that is if you’re a
full face helmet wearer, when you ride in some really,
really muddy conditions, get that goggle lens, tape it
onto the front of your peak and that’s really gonna
help catch that spray that comes off your front wheel
and goes back into your face and on the goggles
you’re actually wearing. If you look at Danny Hart’s
run from 2011 at Champery, he was wearing one of these taped onto his peak of his helmet. All you need some good
old-fashioned duct tape or any sort of strong tape. It’s a super simple hack. Bit of tape. Tape it on the front. Doesn’t have to be pretty. So of course this is a complete hack, it doesn’t look very nice,
but when you’re riding in absolutely foul conditions,
maybe you’re in the Alps on holiday and you get
one of those wet weeks, that will genuinely help
improve the vision you have and you won’t having to
be stop and use tear offs or anything like that that’s even worse. So, it’s a really good solution so keep those old lenses and
when they’re completely done and you want to get rid of ’em, make sure you recycle them ’cause they are plastic after all. (mellow music) Now whilst I always prefer to use a wet or dry oil direct from a dropper
on the bottom of the chain, some of you will still always
use an aerosol or spray de-greaser directly onto your
chain and cassette area here. Now this is actually a
suggestion from another viewer. So, my idea is always to
stuff in some shop towel into the spokes here
just to catch any mist that might go towards your disc rotor. But this helpful viewer
said use a shower cap. Shower caps costs almost nothing. You can obviously get them wet. So, they’re going to deal with that fine and you can spray away
until your heart’s content knowing that nothing’s going
to go near your disc rotor. If you do insist on using
a shower cap for anything, A, don’t put it back in the shower for someone to use and get all oily with. But you could use it for
something else actually. If you’ve got a saddle, for example, that’s got any sort of
stitching or Kevlar saddle maybe that’s going to soak up water and you leave your bike outside, shower cap it up. Sorry, not sorry. (mellow music) Whenever it comes to replacing in the cable from your
bike, whether it’s for your dropper post, suspension controls, or your rear derailleur or
even your front derailleur, it is worth keeping hold of
them because you can trim them down and use them on shorter runs. For example this one was
a rear derailleur cable, it frayed and eventually snapped. I’ve chopped this one
down so I can reuse it in a shorter position on the bike. So it would be beneficial to
use it on the dropper post, also on the lockout system
I’ve got on this bike. But another one, if you’ve got
one that’s extremely short, it’s worth chopping it down,
keeping it in your riding bag. If you’re unlucky enough
to snap a gear in the cable out on the trail, you
can thread this through directly into the rear derailleur. You take the outer housing out, take the remaining inner cable out of the derailleur completely and then using this as a
cable stop thread it through, put it through and then pull
the derailleur into the gear that you want manually and then tighten up against that cable, that
will give you a decent gear to better get home on
without having to use your hardest gear. So well worth keeping and yes, I know, I’m fully aware that I’ve got
a frayed cable right there that I need to replace so
I’ll also be keeping that one trimmed down, maybe for use as my walk out one at a later date. (mellow music) Inner tubes, always keep
your old inner tubes. It’s worth a rainy day
spending a bit of time and fixing them up. That is, of course, unless
you’ve completely slashed them to bits and they’re
beyond the point of repair. So, in that case, go through each of them and if like this one particular here, you can remove the valve core. It’s worth taking the valve core out and keeping that for later,
because they do go wrong time to time and if you
run tubeless on your bike, they do gunk up every now and then, and they’re all the same,
so keep those valve cores. Have a little box of bits,
keep those things separately. I’m just gonna remove a
couple of these valve cores because they’re damn
useful things to keep. Already paid for those inner tubes, so you may as well keep those valve cores. There you go, I’ve got three valve cores out of three old tubes that I know have got really bad pinch,
punches, slashes in them. So whilst you can fix those, it’s only a temporary fix because
they do tend to split again. But they are worth keeping to use with my tubeless valves
for later down the line. However, with other inner
tubes that aren’t so good it’s well worth using these in your bike to protect them against chain slap. So, you get yourself a
length of inner tube. Nice simple one this. You can literally wrap
it around a chain stay. It’s not the prettiest solution, but it’s completely free
because you’ve already got another inner tube
for another purpose. Give it a bit of a stretch to help it on. Mount it all the way
around and you just need a single cable tie or bit of gorilla tape just to hold it in place at the far end. (mellow music) So, when it comes to tires, it’s often worth keeping old tires, as well. You can cut sections of tire up to use as down tube protectors. Quite an extreme example,
but if you’re perhaps going out for a few weeks to do a trip in the Alps or maybe
at Whistler Bike Park, you’re going to get a lot
of wear happen to your bike. And you see quite a lot of
people who do like seasonaires, staying out there, doing
that sort of protection. But also a tire like this one, this particular one,
I’ve already clipped down and used this as a rear tire, but it’s actually worth
bearing this in mind. You can give a tire fresh edges if you just clip them
down with a pair of snips and cut nobbles down,
it takes a bit of time to do it but you can work your way around and turn what was effectively a worn, but good tire into a semi-slick tire. So this is still got
some miles left in it. I’m gonna continue using this one, and it’s well worth considering
doing that yourself. (mellow music) Part of mountain biking is
riding in varied conditions and if you’re like us here in the UK, you have some very wet and muddy seasons and some very dry seasons. Well, they’re a lot shorter for us. Now, I don’t like to chop
and change my tires too much and I tend to actually run three tires and run those for most of the year round. And the way I do this is so I
don’t have to have a dedicated mud set of tires for winter and it becomes expensive
having lots of tires. Now on the front of the bike I like to put the grippier tire,
that’s generally the way. Even in summer, I’ve got
Trail King on the front and Mountain King on the rear. So for winter I’ll swap
that Trail King to the rear, the Mountain King will
sit on the shelf until harder weather again and I’ll
put a Der Baron on the front, which is much more like a mud tire. It’s not, it’s a wide aggressive tire but for my local conditions it’s way too aggressive to use until
it’s really soft and muddy out, so it’s a good combination of actually saving a bit of cash as
well, having three tires, and you get a lot more use
out of ’em by doing that ’cause you’re constantly
swapping ’em around. Now, depending on what
brand you want to do it’s a good way of doing things, ’cause you’re gonna have
that semi-slick style tire out back and you can
have a couple of options. It could be good for use on
the front, also on the rear. Much cheaper, certainly, than
having two sets of tires. Saving you, of course, with the cost. (mellow music) Now, if you ride a lot of bike parks, then it’s fairly likely
you’re going to cook those rear brake pads and the
rear disc rotor itself. Now, what I mean by that
is A You’re going to be wearing them out but also you can actually almost polish that disc rotor. So the brake pads aren’t going to grip quite as well on them. So, the first thing you
can do is to actually renovate those brake
pads and the disc rotor. So, what you wanna do
is take the brake pads off the bike and the disc rotors as well, and then using like a specialist
brake cleaner or anything like an isopropyl alcohol
that will evaporate, clean that disc rotor and
clean those brake pads up. Of course, I’ve got greasy
hands at the moment, but this is an old one
that’s actually bent so we’re not fussed about this option. So you want to clean them up and then using a really coarse emery
or glass or wet and dry paper, roughing those up basically afterwards and you want to basically rescore the surface all of the way round. Now, you also want to be doing this after you’ve cleaned up the brake pads. Like I say, give them a good
clean using brake pad cleaner. Then make sure that they don’t have any residue on afterwards. There’s a long process for doing this. This is just the fast way of doing it. And then really score up the surfaces. Again make sure they’re grease free, make sure they’re completely dry. And then, when you
reinstall back to your bike, go through that bedding in process again. And the fact that they’re
both a bit coarse, hopefully, means that they
will mate back together again well and you’ll get
slightly better braking. That’s ideal if you’re on a trip and your brake pads are starting to fail, because if you put fresh
there brake pads straight on, what’s going to happen
is you’re gonna glaze them over again, it’s not
gonna work well unless you buy a new rotor at the same time. Now one other workaround
you can do with that would be to take your front
brake pads off and swap them to the rear and then buy
some new for the front. And the reason you’re
doing that is those front brake pads well they’re already mated into a disc rotor so
they’re gonna work better on that glazed disc rotor than the brand-new set are of course. The brand new set go on the
front, bed them in as normal. Hopefully, your brakes
will be working better. But just take into account as well, that the way that your brake pads wear. Some riders will use the rear brake more, some will use the front brake more. The front brake, obviously, you’re gonna load up the front wheel more. It’s got more traction so the wheel that’s on the ground more with the traction that is gonna control your speed more. The reason that you’re
just gonna be skidding down the trail is because
your back wheel is light and you can’t control the speed with that. So if you’re sort of riding
around steep terrain, you can use your front brake probably more heavily than you are the rear brake. So just take into account
how much they wear and never let them wear all
the way down to the metal. That’s just gonna cost
you more in the long run ’cause that could damage your pistons, could damage the actual
disc rotors as well. Of course, that means buying all new parts and you want to minimize
having to do that. (mellow music) Now although it’s not a
money saving tip as such, it will save you money in the long run by looking after your investment. So it’s well worth having some sort of frame protection on your bike. Now there are a number of
dedicated kits out there, like Invisiframe, which literally are the best thing that you
can put on your bike but really it needs to be
going straight on a new bike. But there are some other options to those high end
options like Invisiframe. You can get 3M helitape in
rolls, you can get it in sheets. it’s not the most expensive stuff and it is worthwhile having some. And in particular, areas you wanna look at are top tube of your bike. So you may not think that’s an area that gets a lot of wear and tear but actually if you wear knee pads, you’ll find that systematically you’ll be rubbing your knees when
you’re going through turns and you actually dull
down the paint finish on your bike a lot faster
than you might think as well. So if you get some heavy tape, get some of that on the top tube. Make sure that you float the stuff on and make sure you get
all of the bubbles out so it sits on there clean and you barely notice it’s on there to be honest. Other areas worth doing
are areas on the inside of the seat stays where chains
likely to chip the paint, where cables are likely
to rub on the frame, any areas like that,
the side of the forks, they always see a bit of action as well. So take that into account. Of course, like I said there
are a number of dedicated complete frame options,
there are smaller frame kits or you can do it yourself. (mellow music) And finally, probably the best thing that most mountain bikers
can do to save money in the future is just to simply keep your bike clean and lubricated. Mine’s fairly clean but you know does need a bit of attention. But I do give it a post ride check. Every time I ride it I make
sure give it a once-over, any noises it made during
the ride, I check that. Make sure the chain is clean
and lubricated at all times, check the pivot bolts,
all that sort of stuff. But when you wash your
bike, get into the habit of checking your bike for cracks, checking for any sort of damage. Inspect that chain, make
sure there’s no damage, that the chain’s likely to
split, snap, anything like that. And generally, just look after your bike. The more you look after it,
the longer it’s gonna last, the better condition it’s gonna be in, and the less money you’re
gonna need to spend on it. Think of it as doing little and often rather than do one big overhaul and then discovering that several things are loose, worn out, need replacing. It’s a better way of doing things. For a couple more
maintenance related videos, click up here for another load of hacks, including some pretty wild ones of an angle grinder in there. And click down here if you want to see a full sort of cleaning
detail video on a bike and exactly what to look for
when you’re inspecting it. Of course, as always,
click on that round globe to subscribe to the channel. We love you on board with us. And keep those comments coming in below. Of course, if you like random hacks to keep your bike ticking
over, give us a thumbs up.