Should You Get Aero When You Have A Tailwind? | Ask GCN Anything Cycling

Should You Get Aero When You Have A Tailwind? | Ask GCN Anything Cycling


– Welcome along to Ask
GCN Anything, #torqueback on various forms of social media. If you would like to ask a question that could potentially get answered in one of these episodes. The first question this week comes in from Groove Worshipper. He asks, or she, “How
can I train for hills “if there are none? “Training for 375 mile road race “with three 1500 metre climbs.” Well that is going to be an
epic ride, 375 miles, wow. Anyway, it is possible, thankfully, to train for climbs even
if you don’t live near any. And this is a very common
question that we get asked, because of course a lot
of people enter hilly or mountainous sportives or Gran Fondos, but don’t live near any mountains. The key to this then is
to find roads local to you which have very few junctions, not much traffic and basically allow you to keep the power going through the pedals consistently for 15 minutes plus. This is gonna help mimic
what you would experience on a climb, where of course
there is no place to hide and if you stop pedalling
you come to a stop and start going backwards. And actually this,
again, is a great reason, or a reason why indoor trainers
are such an effective tool from this point of view,
because they allow you to put the power through the
pedals as long as you want, whether that’s a 15-minute
interval or a one-hour interval. Although training for 375
miles on an indoor trainer might be quite hard. Anyway, as you might
expect, we have got a video on this very subject. Many moons ago, myself and
Tom Last did a video entitled How To Train For Mountains
When You Don’t Live Near Any, and it’s right here. ♫ So easily – When you start doing
your sweet spot intervals try and find roads with
little or no interruptions, and by that I mean traffic or junctions. Our next question came
in from Rob Smallman, “I see that your brakes
are routed ‘Moto’ style. “I route mine that way as well, “is that rare in the pro peloton?” Well yes, here it is very
rare in the pro peloton but here at GCN I think all the presenters have right brake front,
which is the same of course, as you mentioned, on motorbikes. Reason being that all bikes here in the UK are sold to the general public with the brakes that way around and I presume every other
country in the world where they drive and ride on
the left-hand side of the road it’s exactly the same. However, I have noticed
that even the British pros, in the pro peloton seem to
ride with left brake front. So recently, at the
Dubai Tour, I took a look at Alex Dowsett’s bike
and Adam Blythe’s bike, they both had left brake front and I remember in 2016 having a look at Bradley Wiggins’ team Pinarello and he also had left brake fronts. Yes, it is quite rare. It can be a pain though sometimes if you have it the other way around and then you rent a bike,
should I say, abroad, because it can be extremely dangerous if you grab a handful of the wrong brake. However, it is possible
to swap of ’em over if you’re prepared to put a
little bit of time into it. And in this next video Si Richardson shows you exactly how to do that. – To start with, we need to remove both the front and back inner cables. So to do that it’s
simply a case of undoing the cable singe bolt down at the caliper and removing the cable end cap if need be. – It is time for the rapid fire round, we’ll get kicked off with
this one with Liam Sangaku, “Could we ever see one
piece Bar, stem and hoods? “And do you guys think it’s a good idea?” I personally think it’s
probably some way off because of course the hoods
are generally integral to the shifters and brake levers, which are different across
SRAM, Campagnolo and Shimano. I guess we have electronic
gears becoming more popular, it could be more possible
to just put the gears on the side of the integrated hoods, but you’d then need brake levers and of course with hydraulic
disc brakes coming in that’s going to be extra complicated. Perez writes in saying, “In
case of a strong tailwind, “should I assume an un-aero position “to take advantage of it?” That is a very good question, one I have pondered myself in the past, but don’t know the answer to. So I’m gonna throw it back
out there to the viewers and, hopefully, someone will
be able to give us the answer. Is there a point at which the tailwind is so strong you’re
better off being upright than you are being aero? Looking forward to the
answers on that one. Jan-Harm van der Merwe,
apologies for the pronunciation, “What is GCN’s take on
Tandems and Time Trial bikes “taking Strava KOMs?” Time Trial bikes, I have no problem with, you’re still completely human-powered although very aerodynamic. Tandems? It’s two humans powering it and I think that’s a bit unfair against individuals so I’d go against that. Bryan Lustria, “Is it necessary or better “to get a bike fit first before upgrading “some parts of the bike such
as stem, saddle, handlebar?” Well, I think it is very
important to be fitted well onto your bike, but that
doesn’t necessarily mean spending a whole load of money
on a professional bike fit. There’s loads of information
out there on the Internet and we’ve got plenty of
videos for you as well, which should help you get
into quite an optimal position on your bike, at which
point you can then start to upgrade things if you see fit. Next up, Pete Weal, “Where can I get the
infamous pink GCN t-shirt? “Seriously! “I’ve got good antiperspirant
and don’t fear the pits. “Really want one.” Well, we don’t have any in
stock at the moment on the shop but stay tuned because coming up towards the Giro d’Italia there will no doubt be some pink themed shirts. Although I think that Si might prevent us putting a fully pink T-shirt
back on the shop, ever. Unfortunately. Stuart Toomey, “Why do
pros have 600 mill bottles, “yet in general we have 750 or 500? “Surely it would seem sensible “that the pros have 750 mill bottles?” A lot of pros, I think, have
500 mill bottles as well and they, of course, have
domestiques and team cars behind to get them new bottles, so they don’t need to carry like a total of 1,500 milliliters of
liquid at any one time, ’cause that is quite a bit of weight. So often you will find
that the team leaders only have one full bottle at any one time, because they want to save
a bit of extra weight and they know that someone’s gonna bring them another one soon. Kosmit asks, “Why don’t
pro cyclist jerseys “have the rider’s name on them? “Would help with rider recognition “since some kits are very similar.” Some teams do and other
teams have in the past, I remember Sky used to
have the rider’s surnames down the side here, which did make them very easy to pick out. It is a good and I do think
more teams should have that. And Tom Kyte asks, “Sunglasses
over or under helmet straps? “I think it’s over for
safety should a crash occur. “Discuss.” Well I won’t discuss it at length, ’cause this is the rapid fire round, but over is the way to go and it’s the fashion police, really, that will tell you that. Our final question this
week comes in from Glipto, “Is there a best or a coolest way “for the position of the tension
lever of a quick release?” Well since I’m not very cool, I’m probably not the best
person to ask this question, but yes, I do have my
own personal preferences, I’ve been told never to
position the front quick release so that it’s facing forward, because if you do crash
into or clip another rider or maybe ride close some undergrowth there is the risk that
the quick release skewer might get pulled open, which
of course you do not want to happen when you are out riding. So I tend to have it facing
the rear of the bike, I like the way it looks that way and it might be slightly more aerodynamic, although it probably makes
little to no difference. I don’t like having it
up against the fork leg ’cause I sometimes find then that if you do it uptight it could be hard to get your fingers in to
actually open the thing. And at the rear I have it
positioned between the seat and the chainstay, for no
particular reason I can think of, it must be something I saw a mechanic do when I was much younger. Anyway, this next video
goes in some detail about how to use and adjust
quick release levers. We got some stick for this at the time from more experienced cyclists, but we all had to start somewhere and we all had to learn
the basics at some point. So hopefully this one will help
some of you out there today. What I find is that if I can
just about do it with my thumb on its own that that’s just about right, and it’s not gonna rattle
loose whilst I’m riding. Well, I’m afraid that’s it for this week, don’t forget to leave your questions for next week in the
comment section down below or, if you would prefer social media, you can find us @GCN tweet on Twitter, use the #torqueback, remember, or just search for Global
Cycling Network on Facebook. Make sure you subscribe to the channel by clicking on the globe and I’ve got two more
fairly relevant videos coming up for you now. The first question was
about a 375 mile road race so if you’re someone
that’s looking to train for ultra endurance rides
you can find our recent video on that in the top corner just up there or if you want some more information on aerodynamics with framed
and wheels, et cetera, Si Richardson looks at the benefits of aero wheels in the bottom corner there.