Should Pro Cyclists Use The Same Bikes? | GCN Tech Show Ep. 46


(dynamic clash) – Welcome to the GCN Tech Show. – He’s back. – I am, indeed, and this week we’ve got custom 3D printed helmets, we’ve got electric gear, we’ve got your upgrades, the Bike Vault. Plus, should all racing
cyclists be using the same bike? – Let’s do it. – Yes, do it. (exciting fast paced music) Alright, what’s hot in
tech this week then. – Well, I’ve been in Taipei. – I didn’t know that. – You’ve been in… – Not heard much about that. – You’ve been in Japan. – I have, yes. – I’ve brought you a
present back from Taipei. – Oh, what’s that? – Check this out, it’s a
gold cassette from Ricon – Aw
– To go with your gold chain. – Aw, look at that, he hasn’t
even unboxed it for me yet. Oh, thank you very much, mate. I’ll treasure that. – Thanks, man.
– Cheers – What have you, what
have you got me then? – Oh, yeah, a slightly awkward, it’s on its way, just stuck in customs. A little bit naughty, you
know, that sort of thing, so. – Oh
– Yeah Don’t worry, mate, it’s on its way, yeah. Hexo has just been launched
and that is, in fact, the world’s first 3D
printed custom bike helmet, which is pretty cool. It just goes to show how far we’ve got in the crazy world of tech. – Yeah, so the exact fit of the helmet is achieved by actually
scanning your head with an iPad. And the app creates a 30
thousand point, 3D mesh, which can then be printed, or grown, is a more precise term, into the helmet. – Yeah, now Hexo itself
it actually comprised of plenty of little hexagonal structures, which form a kind of
a honeycomb structure. Now, the benefit,
according to Hexo, of this is that if you were to have the unfortunate incident of a bike crash, the actual structure
itself, they bend and twist, rather than compressing, so, therefore, the actual impact onto your skull is less than with a standard foam helmet, which kind of increases in toughness when you hit it, doesn’t it? – Yeah, well it’s interesting. The other good thing about it is that the actual shell itself is made from 100 percent recycled materials, which is always good to hear. And something else that I found
quite interesting about it, from a logistical point of
view, if you’re a business, is that you don’t have to have a warehouse taking up space with loads of stock. You can simply sort of
print them to order, which is kinda cool. – [Jon] Yeah, it’s just sort of born when you place an order. – [Ollie] Exactly – Now, it’s not quite a simple though, as using an iPad at home to
actually scan your own head. – Yet
– Instead, yeah, exactly, the wonders of the Internet, I’m sure it will available soon. You would actually have to
travel to the HQ in London to actually undergo a master scan, I suppose you could call it. And then, your helmet
would be born from there. Price wise, 350 pounds,
450 dollars or 400 euros, which for a custom printed helmet for you, that’s not bad, is it really? – Yeah, well, you imagine
the price will come down as it does with most things. – Yeah, exactly. More tech later. (dynamic clash) – It’s time now for our weekly
talking point, which is, should all racing be
done on the same bikes? – Yeah, and during my visit to Japan, I went to watch some
Japanese Keirin racing – [Ollie] Not caring – [Jon] No, “caren” is
apparently is the correct way of pronounciating that word. And it got me thinking. – Yeah, well, travel broadens the mind. – It does, indeed. Let me just briefly
explain exactly what it is. Hugely popular in Japan,
it’s one of the four sports you can actually bet on,
hence it’s popularity. And over 1.3 trillion yen
per year is betted on that, which is a lot, that’s a million million. So, whatever currency
that’s in, that’s a lot. – [Ollie] Yeah, well,
I think that difference between the Olympic event, which some of you may be familiar with, is that well, firstly, the
pace bike isn’t motorized – [Jon] Yeah, it’s just a
guy on a regular track bike. – [Ollie] But the other
big difference is that unlike the Olympic event,
the riders all have to use the same bikes
and the same equipment. So, that also means
clothing, wheels, helmets, and all the rest of it. – Of course, they do have the option of choosing the correct size bike, because one size
certainly doesn’t fit all. And also, all parts on those bikes actually have to be
stamped with the NJS logo, which is the governing body,
if you like, for the sport. So, all those parts have to actually pass a strict testing procedure
to make sure they’re up to the strength and rigor of those sprinters, because they’re, well,
pretty big guys and girls. – Yeah, I quite like the helmets. They remind me of Toad from Mario Kart. – [Jon] Did you know what? When I was watching it, I was thinking they could have something
a little bit more elegant, but at the same time, it’s
tradition and tradition’s good. But what’s super about this fact is that they’re riding all
the same sort of equipment, is that it’s all about
the purity of the athlete. So, it’s really all about
man-on-man, woman-on-woman. And I think that’s absolutely
fantastic way to look at it. – Yeah, well, I like the idea of it, but you know, I think there’s
advantages and disadvantages. One of the big advantages for me is that it makes it much harder for you to effectively buy a medal
through using superior equipment. Because, you know, in
elite level track racing, the winning margins are tiny, you know, hundredths of a second, even thousandths of a second sometimes. And the latest skin suit or aero bike can make that much difference
and alter the result. – Now whilst we love tech and innovation, there is an argument, it’s not really in the spirit of sport. Take, for example, a really rich nation, they can invest money into a sport, and they can effectively,
like you’ve already said, kind of buy a medal,
although it’s not quite as simple as that, let’s face it. I’m not taking anything
away from Olympians because there’s a lot of
hard work goes on there, but there is certainly
in cycling, for instance, quite a big correlation between
money spent, money invested, as well as, technology, and
the return of gold medals. – Yeah, and you’ve got
to think that this comes at the expense of poorer
countries, you know, certainly developing countries don’t tend to perform very well at
international level at cycling. But if you compare it, to say, running, we see a lot of developing
nations excel at running. And that’s a sport where
they’re not limited by the need to buy expensive
high-tech equipment. – [Jon] Yeah, that’s a real
level playing field, isn’t it? – [Ollie] Mm – [Jon] There is precedent, of course, from other sports out there,
swimming, for instance, hydrodynamic swimsuits. – [Ollie] Yeah, I remember those. – [Jon] Yeah, some of them
were even just single use and they were stupidly expensive, and every time a swimmer put one on, went into the pool, they
would break a record. And they soon got banned and outlawed because they were just crazy expensive, and it just simply didn’t have a level playing field or pool in that way. – There were many nations
that simply couldn’t afford those suits.
– No – But I think there are
disadvantages to using the same kit. You know, cycling, well,
equipment in cycling, has always kind of been
a key part of the sport. – Yeah, stating the
obvious there, Ollie, yeah? (Ollie laughs) – Yeah, and I know it’s
stating the obvious, but, you know, having brands
involved with the sport and the innovation and sponsorship, that’s a key way of generating revenue and funding the sport
and, you know, without it, you know, a lot of what
happens in the sport wouldn’t be able to happen. That consumerism model is
sort of how its built up. – But arguably, the nations
that really enjoy watching it, global audience, that’s
probably limited to the ones that are actually taking part, largely. – Yeah – They’ve got to, haven’t they? Whereas, if you make it
a little bit more open, it’s gonna be little bit more exciting, and therefore, create a
bigger audience worldwide. – Yeah, I mean if you come from a country where there’s not representation
in the Tour de France, you’re probably not gonna be interested. – No – And maybe that’s why
football’s so popular, because you only need a ball
and it has global appeal because sort of the
whole world can, kind of, much more easily play
and be competitive at it. – Good point. – But I have to admit,
I do love innovation and seeing all the new tech in cycling. – [Jon] Yeah, but maybe there’s
a compromise to be made. So, your regular cycling calendar, the Vuelta, the Giro,
the Tour, the World Tour, continues to use the commercial
partners and kit sponsors and everything like that. – Yeah, but in the Olympics, they would have to use the same equipment. – Yeah
– How bout that? – All riders on the same thing. – Yeah, so it kind of
levels the playing field. It makes it about the
purity of the athlete, but it would also means that
the world record progression was more down to human performance and not down to technological innovation. Which would also be cool
because it would mean that you’d be able to
compare much more easily, today’s riders with
people like Eddie Merckx. – Yeah, remember though, mate, at the Olympics there road
race and time trial, too. So, that’d be quite
interesting wouldn’t it, to see how riders would have to go from their top-of-the-range bikes to maybe dropping down a tier or two. – Yeah – Yeah, much more level playing field, and personally, I’d love to see that. – Yeah, no, it would be cool. – See how, you know, riders
would get on with it. But it’s not what we think, is it? – No, it’s not. So, we wanna know what
you think about this and what you think would
be the best thing to do. So, let us know and get involved
in the comments down below. (dynamic clash) – Now you’d be forgiven
for thinking that XShifter is, in fact, a type of cleaning product, but this product was debuted back in 2016, and was able to convert a two by setup into a two by electric setup. Now, XShifter themselves,
taken a step backwards, and now they’ve made
it into a one by setup, which probably makes sense, isn’t it, because well, we change
gears way more often at the rear than we do at the front. – Yeah so, the idea is that you can mount electronic shifting buttons onto the parts of your handlebars that
you couldn’t necessarily do with existing electronic shifters. And it also allows you to
convert non-electronic group sets into an electronic group set. And the way it works is by putting the E-Link, as it’s known, on
the chainstay of your bike, and then, that has little motors inside and they attach onto the cable, and using that, they can
actually move the cable to change gear on rear derailleurs. – Yeah, so it’s kind of
this smart idea actually. I don’t know why anyone’s
not thought of that before. – Yeah, it’s cool. – In fact, pretty sure they
have, but it wasn’t wireless, but there’s more on that
in an upcoming video. Now, what’s really cool
about this actually is how it works across
all different group sets, and in doing so, I reckon,
across different speeds, too. So, if you have an old 10 speed bike or a five speed bike, in this case, you could covert that
into electronic shifting. I don’t know why you’d want
to, but nonetheless, it’s cool, and it’s great seeing
innovation like that. No prices, as of yet, but
apparently, you can order. So, I don’t know how you
can order with no prices, but hey, there a bit mystery there. Anyway, Ollie, quickly then, part of the pro bike section
we do here on GCN Tech is actually the Free Hub Sound Check. Ultra important, the fans
out there absolutely love it. But whilst you were in Taipei, I understood you found a silent free hub. Tell them all about it. – [Ollie] Yeah, so from
a company called Foss, and it won an award at the
Taipei Bike Show for innovation. And immediately, when
we put it in a video, a lot of people commented, including GMBN, saying that silent free
hubs have been around on mountain bikes for years, but, yes, other silent free hubs to exist, but the key thing with the Foss hub is the mechanism and
the way it works is new. – Yup – So, that’s the innovation there, but I haven’t actually seen one cut open to see how it’s working, but the judges at the
Taipei Bike Show assure me that it is a new type of mechanism. (Ollie laughs) – All we’ve got to hope then, is that no World Tour
teams end up using them, otherwise that will be just like watching a black and white movie
with just silent, really. And now it’s time for
the Free Hub Sound Check. Right, there is none. Yeah, anyway, more tech next week. (whirring sound) (cash register ding) – It’s now time for “Screw
Riding Up Grades, Buy Up Grades”, where you submit before
and after photos or videos of your bikes and equipment
for a chance to win the most coveted prize of all. (snapping) – It used to work. – Summon the K-pron. (beep) – Right, so first this week is Philip. Philip had a 1990 Specialized Sirrus, a bike I remember, just about. How ever the lack of STI
shifters and narrow tires meant Philip felt he
had to buy a new bike. Philip also claims that
his shoes had worn out, so he had nothing compatible with the old Shimano 105 look pedals. Philip, you could have
asked in the Tech Clinic and we could have had a solution. Now, Philip liked the color
of the old profile bars, and it just so happened that
the specialized diverge comp came in the same colorway. Now, the justification here for a new bike is somewhat clutching at straws, isn’t it? But let’s have a look. Alright, there’s the original one, that old Specialized Sirrus. I do remember those, actually. Yeah, big bike, isn’t it, bike old unit. There’s the new one. – [Ollie] Tidy – That is nice, isn’t it? – [Ollie] It’s not the same color though. – Well, yeah, but it’s the
same as the handlebars. – [Ollie] Oh yeah, that’s true. – The profile, I think there
were called Profile Arrow Twos. I liked them, you could extend them. Got a pair still somewhere. Chopped that middle bit. – [Ollie] Oh I get ya. – [Jon] Yeah, anyway, that’s a nice – [Ollie] That’s very nice. – [Jon] That nice, isn’t it? I mean, that’s, it’s not an
upgrade, it’s just a new bike. Treat yourself.
– [Ollie] (laughs) Yeah. – [Jon] Nice one, Philip.
– [Ollie] Yep – [Jon] Alright, then,
who’s he up against. – [Ollie] Well, Greg.
– [Jon] Greg. – Alright, who has had
the honor of being asked to join his local bike team. Being overjoyed at this honor, Greg set about creating a training plan, however, only to receive
an email from the team recommending his needed a cyclocross bike. Unfortunately, Greg’s
joy turned to sadness when he realized he had indeed exceeded his yearly bike
limit, presumably… – Greg, yeah, I feel for you there. – I wonder who sets that limit for Greg or whether he sets that for himself. – Fair idea who. – Yeah, but he said his
wife would not agree to a seventh bike. – There we are. – She’s obviously not
heard of m plus one, Jon. – No
– We need to educate her. But anyways, feeling defeated
on a rainy Berlin day, Greg came across a beautiful, 16 kilo, 25 year old Merida Ambition. – [Jon] Oh, beauty. – [Ollie] And Greg bought
the bike without haste and despite his friends and
family thinking he’s gone mad, Greg could simply see the
potential where no one else could. 65 euros later and a
relatively happy wife, Greg had his new cyclocross bike. There it is. That’s what it looked like when he got it. – Yeah, that’s the old
one, that old Merida. I quite like the paint job on that. The bar end angle is quite simply, that’s like a steering wheel. – [Ollie] Who sat on that
before Greg bought it? – [Jon] Yeah. 65 euros, that’s what
he spent to upgrade it, when it’s a 25 euros in the… Oh, look at that, look at it. – [Ollie] Nice. – [Jon] Greg, I bet, I
reckon you’re the envy of your cyclocross friends
who basically kind of bullied you into making the upgrade. – [Ollie] And that’s gone
one by and everything. – [Jon] Yeah. I do like the peer
pressure that was applied to Greg there, don’t you? Greg, if you wanna be in our gang, mate, yeah, you’re welcome, but
you gotta buy a new bike, or at least that’s what
he told his dear wife. So, who’s it gonna be? Philip or Greg, you
decide, who’s it gonna be? – Yeah, and one of them will win a K-pron. – Yeah, remember, as well,
to submit your upgrades using the uploader tool, down there below. We love looking through. We like reading the romantic stories too. Well, though, Ollie doesn’t, I’m just an old romantic fool. Gives a kiss. (both laugh) (dynamic clash) Right – Bike of the week
– Ho – Last week, you weren’t here,
but we had cyclocross battle. – Oh yeah, like my cross. – Mathieu Van der Poel’s Canyon Inflight versus the crux of Tom Pitcock. – [Jon] Ooh
– And the winner.. – Go on, hit me.
(thumping) Not actually hit me. – 65 percent, it was a
big win, was Van der Poel. – [Jon] That’s a big, well,
verging on landslide victory. – Yeah, sorry, Pittus. – Yeah, sorry bout that, mate. Thought it would be a bit closer. – There you go. So, this week, what do ya got? That’s my Al Pacino impression. – Alright, well, practice that. (Ollie laughs) Alright, okay, this week then, right, don’t know if you know about this, but I was in Japan quite recently, I went to a very, very, very
special bike shop out there called Coursa Course that
I must give a shout out to. And well, he had two bikes
there that were certainly worthy of going head-to-head this week. First up, is the 1996
Pinarello of Miguel Indiram. I’m not gonna get into
too much detail on this because it is going to be covered in a video very, very soon. And it’s up against
this, the Cinelli Laser, one of the most iconic
bike designs of history. Definitely that is an
aero machine from the 80s, and an absolute joy to look at. But, well, I’m totally and
utterly torn between the two. When I was there, I had goosebumps
literally the whole time. But who’s gonna get the win? (both exhales deeply) Vote up there. Is it gonna be the Pinarello of Big Mig or is it gonna be the Cinelli Laser? (dynamic clash) So, now it’s time for the Bike Vault. And it’s actually, I don’t
know why we do it last because it’s one of my favorite bits. – (laughs) Why is it
your favorite bit, Jon? – Because I get to do
something very, very important. Ringing the bell!
(bell clanging) Hoo, I’ve missed it, I’ve missed it. I’ve become quite attached
to this bell, actually. I haven’t rung it in a while. – Yeah, I can tell. – With no further adieu, the first entry this
week is Robert in Dubai. This is Robert’s Colnago
Concept with Dura Ace 9150, a quarter pound meter
lightweight Fernweg wheels, ceramic speed upgrades. That’s a cheeky little number, isn’t it? – [Ollie] Ai, it’s pretty tidy, isn’t it? – [Jon] Cheeky little number. – [Ollie] It’s pretty bling. I’ll tell you what, right. – [Jon] We don’t rate
bikes on the blingness and stuff like that, but in this case, it’s all we’re going on. – [Ollie] There’s some good details here. – [Jon] Like – [Ollie] Lightweight
bottle cages, like those. You know, he’s put weights,
counter weights on his wheels. – [Jon] Yeah – [Ollie] Technical little thing – [Jon] Yeah – [Ollie] But also, grand
prix TT tires on there for low rolling resistance,
little subtle thing there. – [Jon] Some red anodized
thing on the bars, probably a mount of some sort. – [Ollie] I think it’s really, I mean, it’s very expensive, but it’s very smart. – [Jon] And you know what actually? – [Ollie] Yeah – [Jon] Back wheel, massive
white lightweight logo, front wheel, doesn’t. Is that how they come to start? – [Ollie] I think that’s how they come. – [Jon] Okay, right, okay, right. Well, personally, I think because it’s, that’s one of the new, new
ones as well, isn’t it? – [Ollie] Mm
– [Jon] Yeah – [Ollie] Oh, it’s just super nice. – [Jon] Go on, mate,
you wanna ring it or me? Alright, cool, thank you. (bell clanging) Right, anyway, next up,
is Jens from Berlin. And this is Jens’ Popcycle
or popsicle, I guess. It’s made from Columbus steel. Oh, it’s a nice looking bike, isn’t it? – [Ollie] It’s very tidy. It’s that kind of retro
combined with modern thing going on there that I really like. Those Enve wheels are very tidy, as well. – [Jon] Yeah – [Ollie] With the e
type, great sort of combo. – [Jon] Nice looking bike there, isn’t it? That sort of fuchsia, is
that fuchsia that color? – [Ollie] Yeah
– [Jon] Is it? Thank you my personal Pantone chart. – [Ollie] And it’s a
two-toned design, as well, different color on the opposite side. – Ugh, is that Celeste? No, it’s not, is it? – [Ollie] (laughs) No, no. – [Jon] But I do like the head tube badge on that bike, as well. – [Ollie] Mm, aye, he’s got
Chris King headset, as well. – [Jon] Yeah, nice or super nice It’s gotta be super nice. – [Ollie] I think it’s amazing super nice. – [Jon] Alright, super nice.
(bell clanging) You’ve missed that, haven’t you? – Yep – I can tell, look at him,
can’t control himself. (Ollie laughs) Right, who’s this? – [Ollie] This is… – [Jon] You can try and
say where it’s from. – [Ollie] Well, this is
Jason and it’s his retreat about 20 kilometers outside
of Newcastle La Fontaine. – [Jon] Not California – [Ollie] Well yeah, I’ve never… – [Jon] Newcastle, one
of my favorite places. – [Ollie] Newcastle never
looked like that in Biker Grove. – [Jon] No, I think this is
some clever photo shopping. – [Ollie] That, I’ve got
a lot of time for that. I like that classic frame with that mirrored silver Cannondale logo. – [Jon] Yeah, physique
finishing kit, looks like. – [Ollie] Yeah – [Jon] So, what’s it gonna
get, nice or super nice? Because that’s, well, I didn’t know Newcastle
would look like that. Personally, I think it’s super nice, but has to be a majority
vote, it can’t be 50/50. – [Ollie] I just.. – [Jon] You’re gonna break his dreams. – [Ollie] No, I’m a
fan of it, it’s just… – [Jon] Go on, then. That is a super nice, why I bet. (bell clanging) The metro late a man. Sorry bout that, we don’t normally, but it’s a crackin place. Right, this is Raina’s Pinarello
Prince Extreme from 2002. It’s got a complete Campagnolo
super record group set. That’s one of those unusual
Pinarello chain sets, as well, isn’t it? – [Ollie] Yeah
– [Jon] Check it out. Wheels, that is limited edition
Tour de France Ksyriums. – [Ollie] Or Syriums – [Jon] Yeah, Syriums, we used to called them
Syriums, didn’t they? You got Syriums on, mate? – [Ollie] Yeah – [Jon] With the yellow spoke,
just a single yellow spoke. What’d you think of that? There’s something about
that bike I don’t like. – [Ollie] Well, it’s got, I mean, it’s been around a bit that bike. It’s quite an old bike, you
would have thought by now, he’s decided on his steerer on it. – [Jon] Oh yeah, the old steerer. And also, the cranks they should be in the correct positions. – [Ollie] Subtle angles – [Jon] We’ve gone through
this time and time again. – [Ollie] The subtle
angle is just, I mean. – [Jon] The bar tape
looks very, very thick. – [Ollie] Well, the bar tape looks a bit, well, I don’t know,
it’s bulging in places. – [Jon] Yeah – [Ollie] I don’t understand
what’s going on there. – [Jon] And the stand on the front wheel. – [Ollie] Stand on the front wheel… – [Jon] Raina
– [Ollie] Haven’t got to that. – [Jon] Raina, we’ve, we, so close, yet so far
– So close, so close. – Raina, nice bike, right. Final one, this week. – So, he’s Jerry in Singapore who’s got – [Jon] I’ve never been to Singapore. Have you ever been? – [Ollie] No, I’d love to go. – [Jon] I’d love to go, as well, Jerry. – [Ollie] Yeah, Jerry’s got
his Red Hook Crit edition Specialized Allez Sprint, here it is. Great backdrop. – [Jon] That is, isn’t’ it?
– [Ollie] Yeah – [Jon] That’s a crazy backdrop – [Ollie] It’s a – [Jon] It’s looks like a dinosaur, those two glass things and
you’ve got that building that looks like it’s got like a… – [Ollie] Looks like a
garden up top, doesn’t it? – [Jon] Yeah, although, it
looks like a bullet train. They got those in Japan. Did you know I went to Japan? – [Ollie] I really like
the, I’ve said it before, but I’m a big fan of the Allez Sprint. You know, a really
functional, but cool looking aluminum bike that, to
the uneducated person, it quite easily fools
them and makes them think it’s a carbon bike although it’s aluminum. – [Jon] It’s a beauty in there. And one of our mates, Alec Briggs, he rides on one of those, doesn’t he? – [Ollie] He does, yeah. – [Jon] Yeah, one of our good friends. And I think the colors of
it just work brilliantly. And, I mean, what a backdrop, as well. – [Ollie] It’s a cracker, that one. That’s just super nice for me. – [Jon] And it’s super nice for me too. (bell clanging) Ah, you’ve missed that, haven’t you? Look you can’t control it, you love, you absolutely love it
when I ring my bell, right? So, you know what to do, leave your nominations down there using the uploader tool
in the description below. And maybe one day, you make
it into the Bike Vault. (dynamic clash) So, there we are, nearly
time for the end of the show, but don’t go anywhere just
yet, because good news, because over on the GCN shop at shop.globalcyclingnetwork.com, we’ve got a big sale on. You’ve gotta be quick, there’s up to 50 percent
off of selected items, limited too, so you’ve
gotta be quick there. Press that buy button, so you make sure you don’t miss out of anything. – Or when it’s gone, it’s gone. – Exactly – Be getting your Christmas
shopping in early, I guess. – Yeah
– Which is nice. We’ve got loads of cool stuff coming up on the channel this week in between now and the next tech show, including, but not limited to, we’ve got the, well, science
of cornering video coming up, and also, an incredibly mega light bike, possibly one of the
lightest bikes in the world, I went to visit and do a video on, so. – Excited to see that. And Ollie, what on earth
is this thing above us? – Oh, that’s the rim brake
extension clock from last week. – Where does it plug in, anyway? – I’m not sure. – Hang on, rim brake extension clock? – Yeah, we’ve got approximately
one year or 51 weeks until rim brakes become extinct. – Alright, what happens to our bikes then? – The asteroid’s gonna destroy them all. – Cool, I have to make sure
I stay out of the way then. Alright, so you know what to do, like or share this
video with your friends, give it a big old thumbs up. What video should they watch now? How about that bearing special… – Yeah – Everything you need
to know about bearings. Click, well, not there
because that’s that clock, you want to avoid that at all costs. Click just down here.