Should Gianni Moscon Be Banned? | The Cycling Race News Show

Should Gianni Moscon Be Banned? | The Cycling Race News Show


Welcome to the GCN Racing News Show – this
week, Gianni Moscon is handed a 5 week ban by the UCI, we’re asking if this is enough. We also look at the Tours of Poland, Utah
and Portugal, the Vuelta a Burgos, the European Road Championships, the Crescent Vargarda,
and the conclusion of the Trans Continental and Northcape 4000. First up, though, shall we talk about Gianni? The Italian was ousted from the Tour de France
after lashing out at Elie Gesbert on stage 15, and after reviewing the evidence further,
the UCI have handed him a 5 week ban from competition. The Italian federation and Team Sky have accepted
the sanction, and there seems to be no further disciplinary action coming from the team. Now, under normal circumstances, you’d see
this as just punishment, but Moscon’s case is different. He was already given a short ban last year
for using racist language toward Kevin Reza, he was then accused of deliberately causing
Sebastien Reichenbach to crash last Autumn at the Tre Valli Varesine, that case was later
dismissed, but he was then disqualified for hanging onto his team car at the World Championships
in Norway. So the aggressive behaviour at the Tour was
the latest in a string of controversial incidents for the 24 year old, which has led many to
say a 5 week ban from racing simply isn’t enough – after all he’ll be back in time
to represent Italy at this year’s World’s, so he won’t be missing out on any major
objectives. David Brailsford has said that the team will
give Moscon the support needed to control his anger, but does he deserve this final
chance at the biggest team in the World? We’d like your opinions on this – there’s
a poll on the screen now where you can tell us if the punishment was appropriate or not,
but we’d also like you to expand in the comments section below – what would you have
done if you were the UCI or Team Sky? Before you comment, though, it’s probably
worth too thinking about the recent case of Jan Ullrich. The German has had a torrid 10 days, firstly
arrested in Majorca for breaking into next door’s garden and displaying aggressive behaviour,
then arrested again last week in Germany for allegedly strangling a prostitute. Severe, inexcusable and troubling behaviour
that needs the appropriate punishment. Ullrich, though, is a man who is also clearly
in need of some help to get his life back on track. Moscon’s actions over the last year, whilst
clearly very different, also highlight the fact that along with a sanction, he also needs
both support and education in order to change – at 24, he’s still young, so let’s all
hope he gets it. Back to racing itself now but sticking with
Team Sky, their Polish champion Michal Kwiatkowski was dominant at his home tour. He took back to back wins on the uphill finishes
of stages 4 and 5, and backed that up with a 3rd place on stage 6. He was put on the ropes on the final stage
when Mitchelton Scott’s Simon Yates attacked and went into the virtual race lead, and although
Yates did enough for the stage win, Kwiatkowski held on for the overall win by 15 seconds. Kwiatkowski will now head to the Vuelta, where,
incidentally, we will also see Vincenzo Nibali competing – good news that the Italian has
recovered sufficiently from his crash at the Tour. American riders almost completely dominated
the 7 day Larry H Miller Tour of Utah – Tejay Van Garderen won the prologue with a his team,
BMC, taking a clean sweep of the podium that day. One American who thought he’d won a stage
and lived out every pro cyclists worst nightmare was Griffin Easter thought Christmas had come
early – he crossed the line, arms aloft in Cedar City on stage 1, only to realise there
was one lap to go. Unfortunately he wasn’t able to resurrect
the win on the actual finish line, which was taken by Travis McCabe, who would also go
on to win stage 3. The only non American to get a stage win was
young Belgian Jasper Philipsen, who got the better of McCabe in a photo finish at the
end of stage 4. Van Garderen would lose the leaders jersey
on stage 2, though, after a superbly impressive ride from 23 year old Sepp Kuss, who made
a 52km solo breakaway, holding on by 29s to take both the stage win and the yellow jersey,
in front of his Lotto NL Jumbo team mate Neilson Powless. That’s the 2nd year on the trot that Kuss
has been in yellow, and this year he was on another level throughout – he went on not
only to defend that yellow jersey to the finish, but also to win the final 2 stages. On the penultimate stage to Snowbird, Kuss
averaged 354w and 193 heart rate to also set the Strava record. Kuss will now head to the Vuelta a Espana,
which will be his maiden Grand Tour – there he will ride in support of George Bennett,
but with his current form a stage win for himself there is certainly not out of the
question. However it’s his outstanding performance
in Utah that has earned him this week’s GCN Rider of the Week. The other warm up race for the Vuelta a Espana
is the Vuelta a Burgos – recent winners there include Joaquim Rodriguez, Nairo Quintana,
Mikel Landa and Alberto Contador – this year, though, there was a new kid on the block – Ivan
Ramiro Sosa. If you’re not familiar with that name already,
then you will be soon – Sosa is touted as the next Egan Bernal. His overall win came after he got the better
of compatriot Miguel Angel Lopez on the final kilometre of the final stage up to Lagunas
de Neila, and it means he’s now won the last three stages races that he’s ridden. Next up for him is the Tour de l’Avenir,
where he could well follow in the footsteps of Bernal and Quintana, frankly it’s hard
to see him being beaten there. The 20 year old is almost certain to join
the WorldTour next year, with Trek Segafredo his rumoured destination. Boels Dolmans continued their run of success
up in Sweden – their win in the TTT at the Crescent Vargarda was their third in a row
– they finished 16 seconds in front of World Champions Team Sunweb, although you wonder
how much of that was down to a lack of aero bottles, if this tweet from Aike Visbeek is
anything to go by. A few days previous In the women’s European
Time Trial Championships, Ellen Van Dijk reigned supreme for the, also for third time in succession,
taking the crown ahead of compatriot Anna Van Der Breggen. Van Dijk then gave her spare skinsuit to Jos
Van Emden for the men’s event, as his luggage had been lost by Easyjet en route to Glasgow,
something for which he was also blaming Tesco supermarket on social media. In the end he managed 8th on the day, where
Belgian Victor Campenaerts successfully defended his Crown by the narrowest of margins – just
0.63 seconds ahead of 2016 winner Jonathan Castroviejo. The men’s road race was held under some
fairly typical Glaswegian weather – i.e. rain, which made for a hard race. Pre race favourite Peter Sagan was amongst
the high profile riders to abandon on the day, citing the injuries he’s still carrying
from the Tour. A strong 10 man breakaway forged clear inside
the closing 50 kilometres, and it looked like our question from last week, as to whether
cyclocross riders are about to dominate the road world, was about to be answered with
a resounding ‘Yes’ – both Wout Van Aert and Mathieu Van Der Poel made that selection,
but both would ultimately be pipped to the line by Matteo Trentin – a great comeback
from the Italian who fractured his spine at Paris Roubaix this year, and worth noting
too that he also has a background in CycloCross – he was 16th at the 2005 European Junior
Cyclocross Championships, 3 places behind Tom Last. After what was a very tough day in the saddle,
a number of riders have the unenvious task of starting the 7 day Binckbank Tour today,
amongst them Jasper Stuyven, who shared this photo on instagram – apparently there wasn’t
a lot of room left in the hold with all the bikes, so they got to travel with theirs as
hand luggage. After a close start, it was a convincing win
for former elite road racing cyclist James Hayden at the Transcontinental Race, covering
the 3800 kilometre journey from Belgium to Greece in just 8 days, 22 hours and 56 minutes. He was a whole day ahead of his nearest rival,
Matthew Falconer, who passed several of the other race favourites in the final day, as
he covered the last 800km barely stopping to rest. The first woman to finish was Ede Harrison
from the UK, who was also 46th overall. The first pair to finish was American bike
messenger duo Charles Christiansen and Nico Deportaga-Cabrera, who took a rather direct
and very gravelly route after the fourth checkpoint. At the time of writing 65 out of the 249 riders
have completed the journey, . It’s a really, really tough race. Before we finish, just time to say congratulations
to Ian Walker, who held steady to be the first rider home at the North Cape 4000, almost
8 hours ahead of Alex Zavoral. Walker had time to stop and capture a couple
of videos and photos on the final stretch in the North of Norway, which looked absolutely
stunning. There has been a lot of transfer news this
last week, too, so make sure you tune in to tomorrow’s GCN Show for all of that – we’ll
also be talking about Kristof Allegaert’s attempt at the Lands End John O’Groats Lands
End record, which he missed out on by just 16 minutes, despite being completely unsupported. Next week on this show we’ll be bringing
you the action from the Arctic Tour of Norway and Colorado Classic, BOTH of which we are
covering live – to watch you just need to head to facebook.com/gcncycling. I very much hope to have your company for
those races between Thursday and Sunday.. In the meantime, if you haven’t yet seen
our video on the top 7 doping excuses of all time, you can find it down here.