Sewing for Mountain Bikers – Yes, really

Sewing for Mountain Bikers – Yes, really


In the last video we reviewed some mountain
biking products, and I showed you where my Fox Digit glove was coming apart at the seam. Like my gloves, all these products are made
of fabric and thread. They’re also expensive to replace. But you can squeeze a little more life out
of your gear if you know how to fix it. Luckily, Park makes a bike tool for everything. This kit is made for routing cables internally,
and this dummy hub lets you service a drivetrain while the rear wheel is off. They must have something for repairing gloves. Alright, I got this covered. Every drug store on the planet carries sewing
kits, and today I’m getting the nicest one in the store for $5.49. Park, if you’re watching this I forgive
you for not making sewing kits. In fact, I think I can make my own. Well, at least I got the blue right. This is the CSK-1, Cycling Sewing Kit. Although I’m totally unqualified to teach
you anything about sewing, I know enough to fix this glove. On almost any textile the seams are on the
inside. By turning this glove inside out, we can see
where it’s coming apart, and what it’s supposed to look like. In our CSK-1, we have needles, thread, a thimble,
totally useless scissors, and even some spare parts. I could use black thread to match the glove,
but bright orange is easier to see on video. Cut a nice length of thread, and put it through
the eye of your needle. This takes some practice, and it’s easiest
if you have a clean cut on the end of your thread. Pull your thread through so the two ends meet
up with each other. Now for a sewing knot. Just loop the thread around your finger, roll
it, and pull it into this messy gob. Now to repair this seam. I’m just going to use the undamaged part
of the glove as a template, and try to mimic the seam the same distance from the edge. This is pretty tough material, so I’m relying
on the table or the thimble to push the needle through. I lack consistency, proper technique, and
experience, but still this seam is coming together nicely. Alright time tie this up. Go ahead, laugh at my uneven stitches. We’ll see who’s laughing when I turn this
glove back around. And it’s fixed. It’ll be interesting to see how long this
lasts, considering the original seam came apart after a month. If it does break again, I’ll bust out my
CSK-1 and sew it back together. Here you can see the hip pouch on my my hydration
pack is torn in the middle, not on a seam. A good way to mend this would be to sew a
patch over it, but because it’s stretchy I’m just going to close the wound. Even in this case, I’m putting the seam
on the inside so it’s not as vulnerable or ugly. It ain’t pretty, but we stopped it from
tearing anymore. So that’s it. To call this basic sewing is being generous,
but it’s enough to get you by when you’re on the road, or don’t have the funds to
buy new stuff. I think sewing is a skill that every outdoor
enthusiast should know, but what do you guys think? How many of you already repair your own gear? Probably a lot. Do you think Park should make a sewing kit? They make a Pizza cutter. Talk about it in the comments. Thanks for riding with me today and I’ll
see you next time.