Selecting Parts For The Build | Garbage To Gravel -ish Episode 2

Selecting Parts For The Build | Garbage To Gravel -ish Episode 2


(electronic swishing) – Right, here we are, episode two of Garbage To Gravel ish, although it’s more of an adventure bike I’m going to be creating because I’m going to be using that old
Saracen mountain bike frame that was in the bottom of my shed, and putting some new, and some not quite so
new components onto it, and turn it into a bike suitable for all day riding. Let’s have a look then at exactly what components I chose, thanks to a little bit of
help from you guys too. (calm instrumental music) (calm instrumental music) So these bargain wheels, I’ve already put some
tyres and tubes in them, and luckily I’ve got some
Continental tyres laying around. I’ve got a few different tread styles too, because the folks over at GMBN, they don’t tend to use
26 inch tyres that much. So, well all the more lucky for me, I guess you could say. So, I will be able to change them, as and when the terrain requires that, but the rims on these wheels are a pair of Mach 1 ER10. Now, Mach 1 is a French brand. I’m pretty sure it’s
evolved from another brand, but I can’t exactly remember who they turned into Mach 1 from. So I’m pretty sure it
was another brand before and they had a rebrand. Anyway, someone will let me know down in the comment section below. These rims are laced up into a pair of Shimano Deore LX hubs. They are a fair few years old, but importantly, they’re brand new. They’ve never seen any road action, or off-road action for that matter. The rear wheel has got
36 spokes and holes, and the front got 32. Quite a common practise
back in the day there to have a few less on the front, where you don’t necessarily
require such strength. Now, the drive side spokes
have got Sapim spokes. And the non-drive side, they
are, in fact, unbranded, as are the front wheels. But it’s good to have a
brand like Sapim on there because their spokes have been going for many, many years now. The rear wheel has an
over-locknut distance of 135 millimetres. And luckily for me, it
fits inside of that frame. I don’t have to go about cold setting any dropouts there to try and
get it to fit inside of it. And importantly, I can fit a
cassette onto this freehub, which is going to be used on the bike. I’m not going to give it away just yet exactly how many speeds I’m
going to turn the bike into, but it was a deciding factor
of why I went for these wheels. (upbeat instrumental music) Right then, stopping those
wheels is going to be, actually, I’m going to mix and match a pair
of Cantilever brakes on this. Again, like I said, people were saying, why don’t you put this brakes on it, put some V brakes on it,
and everything like that. V brakes are incredibly powerful. Sometimes, in fact, too
powerful for a frame. I wouldn’t be the first person out there, if I was to put a pair of very
strong V brakes onto a bike, pull those levers, and then they’re going to
snap a boss of a frame. That’s not going to happen in my case. I’m going to stick with that
standard Cantilever on the front. And for the rear, well actually, I’m going to hand this one
over to Doddy from GMBN, because he was so excited when he saw what I brought in from
my stash of bits at home. – Cheers John, yeah, kind of strange finding
myself in the GCN set, but quite nice, all the same. So this is your Saracen right, so this is a 26 inch wheel bike, bit of a relic (mumbles), kind
of like you I guess, John. But interestingly it’s got
old-school Cantilever brakes on. So as far as I know you’re turning this into some sort of
adventure bike packing rig, so you’re not going to put discs on it which would be my first choice. My second choice would have been V brakes, but as you pointed out,
probably a little bit flexing and may well break, plus the compatibility with drop bars and mmm not real ideal. So you get down to Cantis. In my eyes, there’s only real one choice, a set of the old-school self-energizing Cantilever brakes, something like a pair of these I reckon might be up your street. So the thing that’s quite cool about self-energizing Cantilever brakes is they revolve around a helix design, which essentially means you
get a mechanical advantage. The more you brake, the more
assistance it gives you. Now on early mountain bikes, it’s a little too powerful
to run on the front end, but on the back end of the bike, you’re going to get
additional braking power, which can’t be a bad
thing when you’re running with a heavily laden
bike like John will be. So it’s essentially a
helix design on here, so as the brake pad contacts the rim, you’re actually using that force to pull the Canti in even more so. It’s really quite a cool system, although apparently they work quite grabby if you run them on the front end. But I reckon even if
Canties doesn’t necessarily want them on the front end of his bike, they may well be good up front too because you’re going
to be running panniers and all sorts of other stuff on there. Check ’em out! (electronic instrumental music) – Of course we are going to
need some standard cables for those Cantilever brakes so I never thought I
would ever have to use these straddle wires again. They’ve been in the bottom of a bag at my house for many many years. I had to get some dust
and cobwebs off of them but they’re in pretty good nick still. So they’ll be providing the stopping power along with of course the
standard bonding cable, no hydraulics on this bike. I’m not going to treat the
rider to that sort of luxury. And here we are, a
cable hanger as well too that that cable is going to go
in down from the brake lever and then of course that will
be providing a bit of leverage to be able to pull on those Cantilevers. So I did actually rob another part off of another old frame in the shed, and it is this cable hanger. So this is going to sit
in between the locking nut and adjusting nut of the headset in order to actually give
that front brake cable a little bit of tension. Now the reason that one behind
me didn’t have one of these is because loads of mountain
bikes back in the day had a really cool bit of
tech, I thought anyway, and it was an internal bit of routing. So on this stem here, you can see this was where
the front brake cable entered, and then the outer cable
butts up against it internally before it would then drop out of this little bit here, and meet the actual cable hanger here, and let the brake do its business. Of course, we do need to
have some tension there, otherwise the brakes
just simply won’t work. Hence why I’ve gone for this. I just hope there’s enough thread on that fork for it to be able to fit, otherwise I’m going to have
to file it down quite a bit. (upbeat instrumental music) Right what about the handlebars then? Yeah I’m going drop handlebars. Of course, we have to, don’t we? This is GCN Tech after all, and GCN and GCN Tech is all
about drop handlebarred bikes. But not always, sometimes we
do stuff with flat bars too. But yeah I’ve managed to find just this old pair of Zipp bars, this pair of service
course ones in a 42 width, they were lurking around in the workshop, and they’re going to be absolutely fine, may have a little look around too, see if we’ve got anything
with slightly flared drops or anything like that,
because I understand that’s the fashionable thing these days, but I’m not that fashionable. And then I’ve also got this very light, this is an old alloy, sorry, an old Kalloy Uno stem. Very lightweight bit of kit, used to have this on one of our old bikes, got titanium bulbs in there too, it is a very flat-looking stem, but the good thing about this is, if you look at it it’s an ahead set stem, whereas that one there,
that’s an old quill stem. So what have I got here? I’ve got a quill to ahead adaptor. Just check that out. So that can easily go
down inside of the actual fork steerer tube, and then
this can clamp on top of it, and the good thing here
is I can just raise and lower the handlebars as required. Of course, it’s easy then too to actually change a stem because if we were using
an old quill style stem with a closed front face to it, we’d have to unwrap the vase,
remove the brake levers, each and every time you want
to change your stem length. And because I’m not going to
know how this thing handles, in theory this is ideal, it means I can swap stem
lengths really really easily. These things are a lifesaver. (upbeat instrumental music) Providing the gear changes
as well as the braking is going to be these Shimano
Tiagra 10-speed levers. Now they are compatible with every single rear derailleur out there, it is quite a specialist bit
of kit, believe it or not, according to the Shimano
service instructions. But I’ve gone for these
because they’re pretty robust and well they’re going to work exactly for what I’ve got in mind because I’m going to be pairing them up with this Shimano GRX
10-speed rear derailleur. So you remember this is
the kind of gravel type groupset that they released this year. And I’m going to be fitting it, because it’s got this sort
of funny clutch mechanism, so I’ve locked it in there, you can see that lower arm will not move. When I release it, it will. That means the chain is going
to keep a good amount of tension over rough ground, and also it’s got that cool shadow style mounting on there too, so you can get that in
just a little bit more on the rear derailleur hanger too. I’m looking forward
actually to setting this up, so I’ve never set up the GRX system. Then we’ve got ourselves
an 11-34 cassette here, so this is kind of a
105 grade if you like. And that luckily fits on the
freehub body of these wheels. I am going to have to get
a very small thin washer which fits in just behind
the actual sprocket cluster and the end of the freehub body, ’cause it just takes up
a little bit of slack. And then that’s going to be good to go. (upbeat instrumental music) So I guess by now it seems
like I’m a bit of a hoarder. I mean yeah the rear derailleur
and also that cassette I did actually go out and buy, but the other bits and
pieces are just things which I’ve managed to accumulate
over the years somehow. I’ve got a bit of a habit of
going on to Cycle Jumbles, which are a thing,
they’re kind of a big sale where people take along
all their old rubbish and I go along and buy it
I guess and take it home. Either way, all that story out of the way, my girlfriend absolutely hates it when I go to these things. Years ago, I managed
to get this chain set. So it’s a really basic looking
bit of kit, square taper. I thought to myself, one day
you’ll use this for something. And one day, I have! So I’m going to fit it onto
that original square taper bottom bracket on that bike, I think that the actual
cranks are going to sit out a little bit too wide,
but it should be okay, because I’m only going to fit
one chain ring on this bike, ’cause you all remember just now I didn’t show you a
front derailleur did I? That’s right, I’m going one-by, the person who’s not
deadly set up against it, but I’m not a huge fan of it really. I’m going to do it just
for the simplicity, and also cost too. And I don’t think I have a
suitable front derailleur laying around either. So here we are, a really
basic square taper crank set, never been used, don’t
know what the person who I bought it from ever intended for it, but the cool thing about it, it looks like one of those
really fancy compact ones because you’ve got a
hidden away mounting here on the rear side of the drive
side crank, I like that. Fitted into that, I’m going to use this Race Face single ring, so
it’s narrow wide chain ring, there’s 38 teeth on there, so I’m going to be running
it with an 11-34 cassette, so I’m going to have
38 paired up with that. I think that’s going to look all right. So it means I can also play around with it and put it on either side till I get that chain
line a little bit better because who knows what it’ll be like, that frame’s an old bit of kit after all. And not forgetting the
fact that I’m going to need some special chain ring bulbs too because remember if you’re
using just one chain ring there’s not quite as much material, so these ones here, picked
these up many moons ago as well. When I thought anodizing
bits was quite cool, and luckily about 15 years later, it’s come back in and it’s in fashion! So even matches the t-shirt there. So they’re going to work absolutely fine holding that in place. And of course, there is five by the way, in case you thought I lost one. And then also a chain there, and I’ve also got some cables
kicking around somewhere too. Or at least I hope I have. The only thing I think
I’ve forgotten about so far is the handlebar tape. And I’m definitely going
to need some of that, so let me know if you’ve got any ideas what I should go for. I don’t want anything too fancy because I’ve got a feeling
that it’s going to get pretty muddy pretty quickly. I’ll tell you what actually, if anyone has got some handlebar tape that they would like to be with a chance to go in on this bike on
that build, let me know. Our address is easy enough to find, so it’s easy enough to send in, mark it for my attention. If not, leave a comment down below and I’ll try my best to reply so we can get some in, and who knows, maybe I’ll have enough
that I can do a lucky dip and pick out a random one and that’ll get fitted on to the bike, whether it matches or not, who knows. Now also, next week I’m going
to be building this bike up, so do you want to see a full-length 50 minute epic of me doing it, just like I did with
that fixie conversion. The editor, I think he
absolutely loved that, he listened to me talking
for 50 minutes in a row. Get involved if you’d like to see that. And also, remember to
like and share this video with your friends too, give me a big old thumbs up. Now for two more great videos, the retro fixie build,
click just down here, and the original cheap bike to super bike, click just down here. For part one, well, how could
you ever have missed that? There’s a link to that
in the description too.