Searching For The World’s Toughest Climb | The GCN Show Ep. 232

Searching For The World’s Toughest Climb | The GCN Show Ep. 232


– Beautiful Sweden and
Denmark in the background. – [Both] Welcome to the GCN Show. – From the start line of the
MS 150 in Richmond, Virginia, welcome to the GNC Show. – Korea, stage 5. – [Both] Welcome to the GNC Show. (speaking in foreign language) (upbeat music) – Welcome to the GNC Show. – Coming up, we’ve got
some great new tech, we wrap up a busy and
excellent week in pro racing, and we search for the
toughest climb in the world. – Well, Lasty is looking for somewhere to go on his summer holidays, isn’t he? The time is right. (easygoing music) – A few months back, we
asked you to help us find the steepest climb in the world. You sent in loads of amazing, and frankly, terrifying footage. (screaming) But this week, a couple things have been getting us thinking. Just what is the hardest, the
toughest climb in the world? – That’s right, we’ve been
searching for climbs for Lasty to suffer up during
the Tour de France, and we stumbled across this, which is called the Col du Jandri. It’s in the French Alps, and it’s the second
highest road in Europe. So at the top you’ll be at
3,151 meters above sea level. And if you start at Les Clapiers, it goes 26.9 kilometers up. And in that time, you
will climb 2,458 meters, which gives you an average
gradient of over 9%. – That is absolutely brutal. – And a lot of it is on gravel, I forgot to say, making it even more epic. – OK, yeah, that is a truly epic climb. But a lot of people out
there think that this is the hardest climb in the world. It’s called Pozza San Glisente. It’s in the Lombardy
region in Northern Italy. It has an average gradient,
an average of 18%, and it’s over 10 kilometers long. The worst bit is 35%. Although on the flip side, it is paved. – Well, sort of because I
was looking at this climb. There are some cobbled sectors. – Oh, right, yeah, there’s cobbles, and there’s a lot of grass as well. More grass than you’d average to expect. – And to be frank, I would take
gravel any day over cobble, so that really is a brute of a climb. Although interestingly, on
the climb-by-bike ranking of climbs in the world, it’s only 13th. The winner in that category is the Mauna Kea, which is in Hawaii. That one’s only 6.1% average gradient, but it’s 68.6 kilometers in length. It’s a long way. – That is a long old climb, isn’t it? That is a long climb. Although, I’ve got to say I
take exception to that being ranked as harder because a 68.8
kilometer-long climb at 6.1% just sounds like a really
long and very slow bike ride, whereas I think I would genuinely struggle at 18% for 10 kilometers. I think that would crack me. – Yeah, less of a ride, more
of a walk, isn’t it really? It’s quite torturous. Well, what we would
really love is for your contribution to this once again. If you could let us know
what is the hardest climb near you or the hardest climb that you’ve ever ridden and send in footage. That would be fantastic. And let us know why it was hard as well. Was it the gradient, was
is the surface, was it the altitude, or was it
something completely different? Photos would be fantastic, but video footage would be even better. You can send it to us
as a message on Facebook or indeed to
[email protected], and we’ll be using that
in a future GNC show. – I’ll like to contribute, Dan. I really would, but I
don’t want to get anywhere near the climb of Draycott in the Mendips in the UK ever again. That’s my nemesis. I will not take photos or video. – Maybe descend it with
a camera at the back, and we’ll reverse the footage. (regal music) – It’s now time for Cycling Shorts. – We shall begin Cycling Shorts this week with news of the Trans Am endurance race. I’m afraid to say that
the news is not good. Just as the race leader, Evan Deutsch, was only 300 miles away
from the finish in Yorktown, news came in of a tragedy
which had taken place a little bit further back down the course. – That’s right, 61-year-old Eric Fishbein from California was riding across Kansas when he was hit from behind
by a vehicle and killed. By all accounts, he was a
really experienced cyclist and had been training
super hard for this event, as you can probably tell
that from his 240 kilometer per day average over the
course of the Trans Am. – It does seem at the
moment as though the event is set to continue because
the riders that knew Eric said that is what he would’ve wanted. But he will undoubtedly be at the forefront of everybody’s minds. – Yeah, and ours as well. It, again, brings tragedy to the world of ultra-endurance cycling. This is the second high profile death this year following the loss of Mike Hall during the India Pacific Wheel Race. Hopefully, these two events
are linked tragically only in terms of timing and
not actually a reflection on ultra-endurance racing, or
indeed the state of the roads. – That’s right because it’s
not the only high profile endurance event taking place
in America at the moment. There’s also the RAM, or
the Race Across America, which is the one where you can indeed receive outside assistance. At the moment, Christoph Strasser is storming the solo men’s event. He looks set to take a
fourth title at the RAM. Meanwhile, Sarah Cooper
is well over half distance and leading the solo women’s event. – Hopefully, everyone
racing across America in either event stay safe at the moment. I tell you what, Dan,
there is definitely a job to do to help make cycling
safer across the world. But the good news is that
people are campaigning really effectively as well to
help improve conditions. One of the most effective, in fact, certainly it has raised awareness as well as putting a
smile on people’s faces is actually taking place at the moment. It is this, the World Naked Bike Ride. To be clear though, it’s not
just one bike ride anymore. It’s lots of different bike rides. In fact, there’s been
over 100 taking place over the last week or so
in cities across the world. And it’s not just an excuse
to let everything hang out. It is a really effective
mass protest against the threat to cyclists
posed by motor vehicles. It raises awareness of just
how vulnerable we really are. – Yeah, it’s a great initiative, and it’s certainly helping
to raise awareness. If you want to get involved, apparently, it’s not too late because more events are planned over the coming weeks. – We missed the one local to us. Sorry, just to put it out there. – Couple of bits of
advice to people though. Firstly, apparently, disc brakes
are banned from the event. And also, make sure that
you do these events en masse because solo naked bike
riding is quite controversial. I noticed in an article
in the Wiltshire Gazette and Herald that local police
are searching for a cyclist who was seen riding along
wearing nothing but a tartan hat. – I tell you what, good
luck to police near them. I certainly would not want to go looking for a naked man wearing a tartan hat. – Incidentally, Matt’s
on holiday this week, but he’s staying local. Don’t think it wasn’t, no. – I don’t know, coincidence. I’ll tell you one good
thing about riding naked. No tan lines, so perhaps
Wiltshire’s naked cyclist had just seen this tweet from pro rider, Carlee Taylor, from the
Ale-Cipollini team who said that in an effort to
try and get rid of her embarrassing tan lines, she’s done this. What can you say?
– It doesn’t quite work. I think we call that the traffic light, or perhaps the Neapolitan. – [Simon] It’s a special
look though, Carlee. – I think we’ll stamp
that Tweet of the Week, although it was run close
by this Instagram video, which was posted by Annette Edmondson. How do you recover from
your biggest career win? That win being the overall classification at the overall women’s tour. Well, like this. Here is Kasia Niewiadoma
getting some well-earned rest and recovery along with Edmondson and fellow pro, Lauren Kitchen. That does look very
cool indeed, doesn’t it, especially at the moment
as we are sat in what is probably the hottest
studio in the world. All right, before we finish
with Cycling Shorts for the week, we wanted to give
a shout out to Red Bull because they are looking to get more people to ride to work this summer. So ditching their cars, ditching
buses, and ditching trains and instead getting
themselves onto saddles. – That’s right, they are
launching the Million Mile Commute where they’re trying to
get cyclists and runners to log one million
human-powered miles to work. You will be recording
your stats on Strava. I think this is cracking. I can’t wait to get involved. I’m all for a human-powered
commute to work. In fact, you better not
get me started, Dan, because I will rhapsodize
about this all day. But let it be said, if you want to get involved, just sign up. The link is in the
description below for you, or just search for Red
Bull Million Mile Commute. – [Dan] There is, in
fact, an extra incentive for those of you in Great Britain. If you sign up and
contribute just one mile out of that million mile total, you will receive a Red Bull sample pack. – That’s not bad.
– No, it’s nice work. – Given how much we love
commutes to work by bike, do make sure you share
any inspirational photos that you might happen to take as well. We would love to see them
as I’m sure would everyone else who follows us on social media. I can actually get
involved in this one, Dan. I’m not going to go looking for Draycott and riding up the hardest
climb in the world, but I do like my commute and
I will take photos of it. (mellow music) It’s been another bumper
week in tech this week, and we’re going to start
with a big welcome back to the world of cycling
for tire brand Pirelli. They actually started sponsoring cycling for the first ever Giro d’Italia in 1909. Supplied most of the
field with Pirelli tires. But anyway, better late than never, guys. They’re back with three new tires. The P Zero Velo, which
is a road racing tire, the P Zero Velo TT, which
is their (mumbles) tire, and then the P Zero Velo 4S, which is their four season training tire. They’ve got a new rubber
compound, they say, which lowers rolling resistance. And they’ve actually got,
interesting, I think, for a slightly treaded casing
as opposed to a slick one. – Yeah, I’m looking forward
to seeing how they compare in testing in the coming
weeks because we know they’ve got a long
pedigree in motorsports. So too do some of their
rivals on road racing, such as Continental and Michelin. There’s going to be some
big news coming out of Mavic this week, which unfortunately, we can’t reveal here on the GCN Show. But stay tuned to the channel because that will be coming up at some point this week. There’s more news coming
out of Italy from Bianchi because they’ve announced
a brand new aero bike. It’s called the Aria, but it’s going to be at a brand new lower price point. Hurrah!
– Yeah, a lower price point. Not cheap exactly though, not yet. Hopefully, though, it will
go some way to helping out GCN viewer, Adam Blundell
who commented under our top six prototype bike video, “Well, I can’t wait to never
be able to afford these,” which is probably a really good point. But anyway, like I said,
hopefully, it will go some way. And it is a start, isn’t it, bringing aero down to that price point definitely. And it’s certainly beautiful to look at. We don’t know quite how fast it is in a wind tunnel, we’re going to stress. But looking at it, a lot of the
aero touches and refinements you’d expect to see in more
expensive bikes are there, like the dropped seat
stays, and also the smooth transition from fork to down tube. – It certainly does
look good, as you said, especially with the campy groups there and the Vision Team 35 wheels as well. Anyway, if aero is not your thing, then perhaps this will be. You might’ve seen a couple of weeks ago Pete Sagan doing donuts with
a Specialized (mumbles) bike. That being a Diverge
on the top of the car. – Yeah, (bleep) it, I wanted to do donuts. – Well, amazingly this week, he’s actually been
spotted riding the thing. ♫ Nothing you can do to make me stay ♫ And you can’t tell me it’s too late – You know what? He is a cool guy. He reminds me in this video of John Tomac, former mountain biker from
the, well, late 80s, early 90s. And the bike looks cool, too, actually. Not quite as cool as Tomac’s Yeti ARC, but still a step in the right direction. This is the second generation
of Specialized Diverge. It actually starts to lose its road roots. Goes more down the avenue of wider tires and actually dual wheel sizes, so you could stick road wheels in there, or also, smaller mountain bike wheels and tires in there as well. What that also does is
it frees up Specialized cyclocross platform, the CruX, to revert back to more
of a pure cyclocross race machine, whatever that even is now. We’re kind of lost with
all these different niches. – Yeah, well, that new CruX
though, it is 300 grams lighter. That’s certainly going to help. They tweaked the geometry
ever so slightly. Although interestingly,
given that this is a bike aimed solely at off road racing, they’ve actually made the
position longer and lower, so it’s much less leisure oriented. – Yeah, nice. Now one bike that is definitely
going to go into legend as an epic endurance bike,
possibly even with a bit of (mumbles) in there as well is this one. So former around the world record holder, Mark Beaumont, is hoping
to reclaim the mantel of the fastest person to
cycle around the globe in less than a fortnight’s time, in fact. His target, 80 days. – Which equates to an
average daily distance of 240 miles, or 386 kilometers. – I’m not even sure I
could do one of those days. – I don’t think you could. – No, I don’t want to try. – I don’t think you should try. – I’m not going to try. – Anyway, so this is the
bike that he is doing it on is a custom KOGA Kimera Premium. As you can see, he’s
using standard road bars, but with aero bar attachments. He’s got (mumbles) wheelset on there with Panaracer 28 millimeter tires. He’s using an SMP saddle as well. – No camping kit, you’ll notice, and that’s because Beaumont
is going to be fully supported for this round the world
trip as opposed to last time where he was completely unsupported. – You mean he slept in hedges? – Effectively, yes. (mellow music) – We will begin racing news with the Tour de Suisse, which concluded on Sunday. World champion, Pete
Sagan, took two of the nine stages, which brings his
total tally of career stage wins at the race up to 15. In that time, he’s also won the outright points jersey on five occasions. Now that is a lot of
trips to the podium, Si, but I don’t think he’s ever had a trip to the podium quite like this one. (lighthearted jazz music) – He’s clearly not a climber, is he? – No, I guess you could say that. – No, he’s not. The overall victory was
taken by Simon Spilak for the second time in his career. And he clearly has a thing for Switzerland because seven out of his 12 career wins have been in either
the Tour of Switzerland or the Tour of Romandie. – Good stat, Si.
– Thank you very much. Now he took a commanding
win on stage seven, and then after that, the
overall was never a doubt. – Hey, guys, how’s it going? – Ah, Statman Jon. Jon, what are you up to? – I’m back with some more stats for you. Stat attack. This week are some stats
from the Tour de Suisse where Philippe Gilbert hit a whopping 119.25 kilometers per hour. Not bad going at all. – Well, it is known
for high speed descent. But was it just on descent
where they were fast, Jon? – It’s not just high speeds
on the descents though, guys. Pete Sagan hit a whopping 76.2ks per hour in the sprint finish. And also, he kicked at a massive 1,417 watts for five seconds. – That’s quite a good effort actually. Do you reckon he’d like to ride a triplet? – Possibly. – Final one for you, Ben
King of Team Dimension Data who was in the breakaway
has some impressive numbers. He burned 5,762 calories. That’s the same as 23 burgers,
11 Toblerones, or 89 apples. – He’s eating an invisible apple. What are you doing, Jon? – [Dan] Right, is that it? – One final thing, guys. On Dan’s video about six checks to make before you go out for a bike ride, Hammydemuck said, “Apron? “Are you baking a cake?” Well, are you? – That wasn’t very nice. – I tell you what, mate, I
thought you looked great. I actually borrowed that apron yesterday. – Yeah, thanks, Simon. Anyway, I know we shouldn’t be partisan, but I really enjoyed
watching Larry Warbasse take his first pro victory, and indeed the first victory for his
team, Aqua Blue Sport. He’s a man that works tirelessly all the time for other riders. And it was great to see that
not only was he ecstatic, as you can see from this tweet, but also, everyone else in the peloton seemed very happy for him, too. He’s obvious a very popular
man within the bunch. – Yeah. Rohan Dennis bookended
the race with a really impressive victory on the
final day’s time trial, and it was a great day for his team, BMC, because they also took
second with Stefan Kung and third with Damiano Caruso in the day. And Caruso got second overall as well. – And it wasn’t just a great
day for them in Switzerland because their Swiss
rider also took overall at the Route du Sud in
France where he also won the mountains jersey and
the point jersey as well. That rider being Silvan Dillier. Meanwhile, Cannondale
continued their momentum this season by winning
the final two stages with Pierre Rolland and Thomas Scully. – Yep, that was nice to see, wasn’t it? Elsewhere, Rafal Majka
showed that he’s getting ready for Tour de France with a great win overall at the Tour of Slovenia. Sam Bennett took two wins in the sprints. But it also marked a
really important return to competition for Mark Cavendish, who’d been struck down with Epstein Barr. He said he ordinarily wouldn’t write home about second place,
but he was happy enough to actually write to Twitter about it. Check it out, there you go. He said he’s never been happier
with second place before. – I was always quite content with second. It was a lot better than I normally did. – Well, it meant you nearly won. I was always really happy with it. – Right, would you like an update, Si, on the two most talented
riders in the world? – Matt and Lasty, yes, please. – No, they being Wout van
Out and Mathieu van der Poel. – Oh, yeah, yeah, fair enough. – They finished one-two in that order at Ride Bruges at the weekend. I think further proof that that (mumbles) is going to continue
for many years to come even once they’ve left the
world of cyclocross, if they do. I’m very much looking forward to it. I know I saw that every week, but two incredible
prospects moving forward. Admittedly not the
biggest race in the world, but still some decent riders they’d be, including Jens Keukeleire, who recently won the Tour of Belgium. – Yeah, a rivalry to watch
when cyclocross and join road. Imagine when they leave road
and go to bike gymnastics. That’s going to get fascinating, isn’t it? – Well, yeah. But I’m not sure that will happen. – Watch this (mumbles). Anyway, Dan, are you ready, mate? It’s time for Wattage Bazooka. – Bazooka! (music) – Oh yeah. This week we’ve got to give
it to Domenico Pozzovivo. He dropped a serious
wattage bazooka on the final climb of the Albulapass in Switzerland. He caught Canadian, Mike
Woods, on the climb, and then in a show of class,
he dropped him on a very wet, twisty descent taking the
biggest victory in ages. Class.
– Yeah, that is well-deserved. Meanwhile, the viewer Wattage
Bazooka this week goes to Brad Wiggins.
– Bradley Wiggins? – Yeah, we thought we
could get away with this because he’s no longer
a professional rider. We’re not entirely sure
if he watches our videos. But nevertheless, it goes to him for this. Eight months after retirement, a PB in terms of sprint power. That is almost cracking 1,600 watts. That’s quite impressive. – [Simon] Yeah, he puts
the gun away on paper, wouldn’t he?
– Yeah, he would’ve done. I wonder what he’s training for. I wonder whether it’s the
Parents Race at Sports Day because that’s normally
a sprint, isn’t it? – I tell you, you’d luck
out if there was a cycling race Parents Race at
Sports Day, wouldn’t he? – I think his sprinting running
will have improved as well. He’s doing a bit of
body building, isn’t he? It is time now for Hack forward
slash Bodge of the Week. Starting off with this one that was sent in on Facebook by Richard Waine. He spotted this at the Isle of Man TT race and doesn’t know where to start. I don’t think I know
where to start either, Si. It’s reasonably neat,
that wooden bit on the top tube, as well as the basket. – [Simon] I think he
might have hit the nail on the head and they pretended by saying that wooden bit along the top tube, Dan. That could could never be good. The fact that he’s nailed some
plastic baskets to the back. That, to my mind, makes it a bodge. – [Dan] Yeah, decent effort, but bodge. Sorry. – [Simon] OK, next up,
I really like this one. This was sent in by Marlene O’Hamm. She writes, “When you need
the room in your trunk “and your husband welds things.” Check it out. That is one super cool homemade roof rack. – It is indeed.
– I like that a lot. – [Dan] I think we’re going
to say that is a hack. – [Simon] Definite hack, absolutely. – [Dan] All right, this one
was sent in by James Loks, who saw this beauty in Holland Park. Check out the details. Apparently, he was told it
was only a 61-tooth chainring, which is pretty big,
I think you might say. A couple of things
stand out to me on this. One, the not so subtle lugs on the bike. But two, the snowflake spoke pattern on the front wheel there. Has he got it on the rear wheel as well? Anyway, that is something I always wanted in the 90s on my mountain bike. Never got it, but just having that, I’m going to deem it a hack. – [Simon] I think that’s a hack. That is just one very stylish bike. I don’t know how good it is, but it’s certainly
stylish, unlike this one, which was sent in by Richard Biggs. He’s got tassels on his pedals. – [Dan] Yeah, that was
the first thing I saw. Tassels on the pedal. I’ve never seen that before. – [Simon] And to be fair those wattage bazookas attached to the back. – [Dan] No, I think people did
educate us on the difference between missiles and
wattage bazookas when we first started that segment, did they? – [Simon] Yeah, they did. Anyway, there you go, see if
you can decipher what on Earth is going on with that crazy bike. – We should finish on a high though. This came in on Instagram from @hexzor2204 claiming the world’s smallest
3D printed chain key. But I’m not sure if he’s got Guinness involved to ratify that, but looks neat. – Do you know what, Dan? It’s not small enough for my tastes. (mellow music) – Caption Competition now. Last week’s photo was this one. The winner of a CamelBak GCN waterbottle along with that Velochef
book from Henrik Orre, Team Sky chef, is Ronny Dorling who said, “Orica Scott making the hip
call on peak orientation. “Get Ovo it, Matt!” – It’s peak down! Down! Down! Down! Down! Down! – Oh great, great pun there. – Get in touch with
your address on Facebook and we’ll get those prizes off
to you as soon as possible. – Yeah, this week your caption photo to get your teeth stuck into is this one. Two Bahrain Merida riders, well, one doing the perfect teammate role. Can I have a go at this one, mate? – Yeah, go on.
– OK. Is this going to take long ’cause it feels a bit like taking the piss. – I can see what you did there. – Thanks, mate. – If you would like to attempt
to win the GCN CamelBak water bottle next week, please
leave your captions in the comments section just
down below this video. – Yeah. Fist bump. – No. (mellow music) Coming up on the channel this week, on Wednesday, Matt talks you
through some climbing mistakes. But we’ve also got that news from Mavic on Wednesday as well. And then on Thursday, we show you nine magnificent ways to drink from a bidon. – [Male Speaker] The lob is
for experts only and not to be tried at home as you
may break a light shade. Month to learn, years to perfect. Each rider must be in perfect
harmony with the other. As with this method, there
is no margin for error. With spot-on execution, this is really something special to behold. – Friday is ask GCN anything as per usual, but we’ve also got our Tour de France preview show on Friday as well. That race is coming up very quickly now. – I can’t wait. I literally can’t wait. Sunday, we’ve, oh, Saturday. Sorry, I can’t wait. Enrico Gasparotto’s pro
bike on the channel. Make sure you check that one out. Then on Sunday, we have
another unboxing for you. If you like bike maintenance,
this is going to be good. And if you don’t like bike
maintenance, arguably, it’ll be even better because
we’ve all got to do it. But this is going to make it
a whole lot easier for you. Then on Monday, we’ve got a
bike maintenance video for you. This one is how to remove stripped bolts. – And on Tuesday, we
are not back in the set because Matt and I are
bringing you the GCN Show from Alta Badia and the Maratona. – And I’m on my way to
Tour de France with Lasty. – [Male Speaker] From Fort Louis college cycling in a hotel room in Albuquerque. – [All] Welcome to the GCN Show. (laughing) – We shall finish as
ever with Extreme Corner, which this week answers
the question we posed last week on the show to Simon Andreassen, who posted this photo on social media. – That’s right. Expert witnesses over
at GMBN, Blake Samson, reckoned that unless
he had amazing skills, he was actually going to case this jump. But Andreassen got in touch
and said no, he cleared it. And then he posted a video to prove it. Check it out. (upbeat music) – Yeah, well, he’s proven that he’s got the skills, that’s for sure. – That looked very smooth. And when you look closely, that’s a gravely pump track as well. Fair play, Simon, fair play. – Well, that’s the end
of this week’s GCN Show. Don’t forget to head over to
shop.globalcyclingnetwork.com if you’d like to purchase
any of our merchandise. And there will, in fact,
be some new merchandise. Keep your eye on that website this week. Make sure you subscribe to
the GCN Global Cycling Network if you haven’t done this
already by clicking on the glow. I know we’ve got a couple of
videos coming up for you now. Down here is what to wear
in the high mountains. – Yep, or down here we’ve got
that top six prototype bikes. Make sure you check that one out.