Road Bike Maintenance : Learn Road Bike Gearing Tips

Road Bike Maintenance : Learn Road Bike Gearing Tips


Like we want on a mountain bike, we have a
choice of several different size ranges for both our smallest cog and largest cog on a
road bike. If you’re used to mountain biking, you probably want to go with one of the larger
available sizes. In this specific case, for the Shimano nine speed, the largest cog you
can get is a 27. The overall gear range that gives me is 12-27, which, there’s a drawback
to that in that I have a wider range — a bigger jump — between cogs, which isn’t quite
as smooth, but it allows me to have significantly lower climbing gears than I would otherwise.
I can swap things out, like a 23-tooth cassette like this — this is just the top three cogs,
but the 23-tooth cassette is going to give me tighter spacing in the mid-range of the
cassette, where I should be spending most of my time. Which is nice, for those slight
changes in pace, you can really keep putting out the same effort instead of having to really
spin a gear that’s far too easy or really chug in a gear that’s too hard. So, just know
that the largest cassette that you can run with a road-style derailleur is between 27
and 30 teeth, depending on the manufacturer. If you want a bigger cassette like you could
have on your mountain bike — what you can do, if you’re running Shimano stuff, is you
can change out to a mountain bike derailleur from a road derailleur — something with a
longer cage. It’s designed to shift across more teeth, and it’s going to enable you to
work a little bit easier getting up the hills.