Richie Porte’s Trek Speed Concept Time Trial Bike

Richie Porte’s Trek Speed Concept Time Trial Bike


– I’m here with the Trek
Speed Concept time trial bike belonging to Richie Porte
of the Trek-Segafredo team. He’s new to the squad, the 2009 team. So let’s have a look at
this beast of a bike, which the Tasmanian Devil is hoping to pilot to victory this season. (booming sounds) (rap backing music) Let’s begin with the frame. It’s built using Trek’s
patented OCLV carbon process, and has Kammtail tube shapes
to aid airflow around them when racing against the clock. Integration is a key
player within this bike, and pieces of that jigsaw puzzle include the direct mount stem, as well as direct mount
brakes that are tucked away. The rear on the underside of the chain stays near the bottom bracket, and the front, within
the actual fork blades. Speaking of the fork, it
has a ratio of six to one. Which is good news for aero lovers, as previously bikes were
allowed to have a maximum of three to one width to depth ratio. Also helping with the aero
gains is the handlebar setup. Gone are the days of unsightly
and un-aero exposed cables. Thanks partly due to the internal routing, and also because of electronic gearing. (rap backing music) Sticking with the electronic gearing, Port has a pair of SRAM
Blips gear shifters mounted to the innermost
side of the base bar, down near the brake levers, meaning he can shift through the gears when leaving a start
ramp, or when climbing. And they’re covered up nicely
under some handlebar tape, and there are also some eTap Clics in the end of the aero extensions too, which also have some bar tape on them. Porte is one of the few
riders who uses this instead of the very commonplace
skateboard grip tape. Now both sets of gear buttons are wired up to the SRAM eTap Blip Box that transmits the shifting signal to the derailleurs. Right now it’s pretty visible
there on the back of the stem, and if it could be fitted within somewhere else on the bike it would, because well, the mechanics at the team are truly world class, I’ve spent quite a bit of time with them. (rap backing music) Let’s move on to the gearing then. Well the team have saved some weight by getting rid of the front derailleur, and opting to use a 50
tooth single aero chain ring up front on the SRAM RED AXS cranks, that also have a Quarq DZero
power meter within them. Porte, he’s using 170mm long crank arms, and they’re finished off with a pair of Shimano Dura-ace 9100 SPDSL pedals. Some of you may well be wondering why they aren’t using a chain catcher on the front derailleur main, if they’re using a single ring. Well, that aero chain ring
is a narrow wide model, but the supposed magic in the system comes from the rear derailleur. So it’s the new SRAM AXS model, and it has a system inside of
it called Orbit technology, and apparently it limits chain bounce by controlling the downward
movement when you hit a bump. So in short, it aims to
stop the lowest pulley wheel from moving forward and
giving you that slack chain. Now that plays hand-in-hand
with the flat top chain, designed in this way as
the 12-speed drive train requires a narrower chain, and the added material in
the design in the flat top apparently means extra strength. And get this, according to SRAM, lasts 36% longer than the 11-speed chain. (rap backing music) I just mentioned the 12 speed drive train, so let’s talk about that cassette. It has a 10 to 26 ratio on this bike, and fits onto the wheel
using an XDR style free hub, rather than one with
the traditional splines. The cassette also comes with
a 28 or 33 lower sprocket too, so depending on course conditions, these can easily be swapped over. Sticking with the wheels, the rear wheel is branded up
with the team’s name and logo, but underneath all of that
it’s a Zipp Disc wheel. And the front wheel, well that’s a PRO Tri-spoke
covered up with black tape. But why the coverup? Well Bontrager, who are
the team’s wheel sponsor, and part of the trek group, don’t make this wheel or
tri-spoke, so that’s why. Now the wheels are fitted with Vittoria Corsa Speed
tubular tires, with well, what I think is a beautiful skin wall, and they come in a width of 25mm. The team have also wrapped
some electrical tape around the front valve
to stop it from knocking or rattling when riding along, and despite my best efforts
I couldn’t budge it. And finally, on the left hand
side of the rear disc wheel, the team have glued a magnet
on for the speed sensor. (rap backing music) The measurements that the one meter, seventy-two centimeter, or five foot, seven inch Tasmanian
Devil has, are as follows. The top of the saddle to center of the bottom bracket, 69.5cm. The reach from tip of the saddle to center of base bar is 46cm. And the drop from the saddle
to the top of the tri bar pads is 11 and a half centimeters. What about that free hub? Let’s have a listen. (whirring then ratcheting) And the weight of the bike
comes in at 7.7 kilos. Finishing touches include a
Bontrager Hilo XXX saddle, with carbon fiber rails and shell, as well as a cutout groove in the center to relieve pressure, and a grippy style texture on
the nose of the saddle too. Now mounted centrally between
the handlebar extensions, there’s a Bontrager
mount for the computer, so Port can easily monitor his power, his heart rate, and speed. Now I hope you enjoyed this
look at the bike of Richie Port, let me know what you think of it down there in the comments below, and also give it a big thumbs up and share it with your mates. Don’t forget to check out the GCN shop at shop.globalcyclingnetwork.com. And now for two more great videos, how about clicking those
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