Richie Porte’s BMC Teammachine SLR01 Pro Bike | Tour De France 2017

Richie Porte’s BMC Teammachine SLR01 Pro Bike | Tour De France 2017


– Richie Porte has been one of the riders of the year so far, and he’s one of the favourites in the Tour de France, which is why we’re looking at this bike. It’s his new BMC TeamMachine SLR01. (upbeat hip hop music) The TeamMachine family of frames has been one of the near
constants in the Pro Peloton over the last few years to a decade or so. And around midway through this
year, it received an update. So it is now available in rim
brake and disc brake versions. This version is, of course,
the rim brake version. The rim brake versions have direct mount brakes front and rear. There have been a few redesigns at the shapes and the carbon layup. For a few seasons, BMC’s bike colour has always been matte carbon black, but recently they’ve
switched to cherry red, which I think is a very,
very cool bike colour. I’ve heard that red cars go
faster, maybe red bikes do too. Let’s look at the build of this one. And starting right at the top, he’s got a Fi’zi:k Arione VSX saddle, so it’s got a very deep
channel to relieve pressure. And the rails on that one are
fully braided carbon fibre. So braided carbon fibre
rails, one of Fi’zi:k’s signature touches to many of
their top-of-the-range saddles. The seat post is BMC, and that’s
part of the frameset unit. Moving forward from there, and also part of the frameset unit, and
also manufactured by BMC, is the very new, very neat integrated stem and integrated spacers. So you can see the top
spacer integrates almost all the way to the very front of the stem. Porte’s handlebars are 3T,
and they’re carbon fibre, and they’ve got an aero
section on the top, and bar tape is also supplied by 3T. Shifting and braking is
taken care of by Shimano’s latest version of their Dura-Ace groupset. Linked up to the shifters
is the Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 front mech and a Shimano
Dura-Ace Di2 rear mech. And linked up to the brakes is a pair of Shimano Dura-Ace direct mount brakes. The only brake from the
new Shimano Dura-Ace setup is the chainset, and that is
the slightly older version of Dura-Ace, which is to
accommodate the SRM PowerMeters that every BMC rider rides with. To match with that chainset,
the chain rings are also the oldest style Shimano
Dura-Ace, and they are 53/39. The chain is Dura-Ace, as is the cassette, and that’s an 11 through to 30 tooth. Pedals are also Shimano,
they’re also Dura-Ace, and they’re also the latest version. Bottle cages and bottles like all the BMC Team bikes are provided by Elite. Wheels, like the groupset,
are Shimano Dura-Ace. They are the latest version
of the Dura-Ace C40 wheels, and glued onto those
wheels are Vittoria Corsa 25 millimetre tubular
tyres with the skinwall. I think skinwall tubulars
always look very cool. With the main details of the bike covered, it’s time to look at the little details that really elevate every pro bike. Porte has got a number
holder on his seatpost, and to me, that looks like
it might be glued or epoxyed onto the seatpost just to keep things as tidy as possible and
to minimise zip tie use. Minimal zip tie use is, I think, a signature touch of pro cycle mechanics. On the chainstay, he’s
got a chainstay protector, which is unusual for pro bikes. Usually that’s something that
they’ll forego because they have a relatively high turnover
of bikes and equipment. Porte’s bike, of course,
has a name sticker, and that is supplied by the team. You can tell because it
is in the BMC Team font. And a final detail about the
new BMC TeamMachine SLR01 that I very much like is
the very neatly integrated Di2 junction box, which is
right up near the head tube. With all of that covered, it’s
time for vital statistics. (upbeat hip hop music) The vital statistics on
Porte’s bike are as follows. We’ve already covered the gearing, but let’s touch on it again. He’s got 53/39 chainrings and
11 through to 30 cassette. And his cranks are 170 millimetres long. His saddle height comes in
at just under 70 centimetres, and his reach from the nose of the saddle to the centre of the stem is
just around 51 centimetres. The stem is 12 centimetres long, and his bars are 42 centimetres wide. The tyre widths are marked up as 25s, but according to our callipers, they’re coming in at around
24 to 24.2 millimetres wide. The weight of the bike,
it’s a super light bike. They can definitely get this
down way below the UCI’s lower weight limit of 6.8
kilos if they wanted to, which they don’t because
they’re not gonna do that. So it comes in at around seven kilos. With all that covered, it’s time for the free hub soundcheck. (wheel whirring) If you’ve enjoyed takin’ a
close look at Richie Porte’s pro bike, don’t forget to
hit the thumbs up button. Let us know your thoughts in the comments, and share this video with your friends. To subscribe to GCN and to
get more pro bike videos, click on our logo, which
is onscreen right now. Also onscreen is a link to
our shop, and right there is a link to our Tour
de France 2017 playlist, where you can catch all of
our Tour de France videos. And here is a link to another pro bike.