Rebuilding Old Road Bike Wheels & Using Lube Whilst Cycling | GCN Tech Clinic #AskGCNTech

Rebuilding Old Road Bike Wheels & Using Lube Whilst Cycling | GCN Tech Clinic #AskGCNTech


– Hello everybody and welcome
along to another (beep) Why’s do ya keep saying (beep). Ah, it’s GCN Tech Clinic. Let me spell Tech right, here. Okay (beep). Welcome along to another
edition of the GCN Tech Clinic. This is the point in
the week where we answer your tech-related questions. It is the first one that I’ve ever done, for good reason, as
you’re about to find out very shortly, indeed. Thankfully this time
next week you should have a proper tech expert back
here to answer your questions so if you’ve got any, leave them in the Comments section below using the hashtag askgcntech. Without further ado, then
I shall dive head first into a world of the unknown for me. Our first question in this week comes in from Steffan Hanson. Hi Jon, loving the show. Sorry, Jon’s not here. Recently, I had a little
accident where I damaged the rims on both wheels. The company sells the rims separately. As I’m still learning
maintenance, I’d rather have a go at building
the wheels back up again then take ’em to the local part shop to see what I did wrong. They charge about the same price. My spokes and hubs were luckily undamaged. What equipment would I need
to dismantle the wheels to re-use the spokes, if at all possible? And how would I start taking
the spokes off the rim and the hubs? Well, actually taking the rim away from the spokes and the hub is a reasonably simply process. All you’re going to need
for that is the correct size spoke key. Once you’ve got that,
you just undo the nipples one by one, bearing in mind
that to undo the nipples you have to turn them clockwise as you’re looking at the rim. Once you’ve done that all
the way around the wheel, the spokes should come away. You’ll be asked to take the rim away, salvage all the nipples,
and then one by one, you can push the spokes
out through the hub flanges and salvage them, as well. Then you’ve got everything separate and you can start to put
your new rim back over. Now fortunately, building
a new wheel back up is a far more complicated process and you will need some more tools. For example, a wheel truing
stand is going to be necessary to get it right and also
a wheel dishing tool to make sure that you’ve
got the rim in the center of the hubs. You’re also going to need to
make sure you get the right spoke tension. Now, this is not something
I’ve ever attempted myself because it does seem rather complicated, but if you want to, there
is a wealth of information out there on the internet
to help you along your way. I’m going to wish you the best of luck and I’m sure it’s going
to be very satisfying if you do get it right. So let us know how you do get on in the Comments section below. But for me, this is one that
I would leave to an expert wheel builder. However, if there are those out there who’ve damaged your rim
in terms of the fact that it’s not true anymore,
the following video has a young expert mechanic to
guide you through the process step by step on getting it straight again. The advantage of a wheel truing
stand is this point here. It allows you to very easily see and hear exactly where the rim is warped. You can do the same thing
with a wheel inside the frame or forks using the brake
pads, but of course, it’s much harder to be accurate and it’ll make the job,
overall, a lot harder as well. Believe it or not, that
video was only six years ago. Even now I now look about 20 years older. Right, our next question
today was posted on Twitter using the hashtag askgcntech
from Simon Neaves. Can I add lube on top of a waxed chain? For example, if it rains half
way through a five day tour, or if I don’t get round to
properly cleaning off the wax and need to commute in the rain. Do wet, dry, or wax-based wax lubes mix with a paraffin waxed chain? It’s complicated even
to read out, that one. Uh, I’ve consulted Jon
and Ollie on this one and yes, you can put lube
on top of a waxed chain. Not ideal or optimal, but it
is better than riding around with a completely dry drive train. Now what you can do is plan for this. So if you’re doing a multi-day
tour like your five days, and it looks like the
weather’s not going be optimal, it’s best to pack a small pot
of lube so you can reapply it when necessary. So for example, Ollie
recently did a 350 kilometer bike packing tour over a couple of days and his chain dried out
after eight kilometer– eighty kilometers, should I say. And he hadn’t prepared
very well and didn’t have that small pot of lube with him. So what he did was found a random shop with some cooking oil and
applied a small amount of that to his chain. Again, that is far from ideal, but it did stop the drive
train from squeaking quite so much. Now, if you’re wondering
exactly what waxing your chain is all about, what it
does, and how to do it, coming out, we’ve got an old
video from an old mechanic who takes you through the
process, step-by-step. Probably that much. Probably five to 10 minutes to melt. In the meantime, keep a close eye on it ’cause you don’t want
this goin’ out of hand. Shouldn’t do it, not in this. And whilst you’re waitin’ on it to melt, you can also give it a
little stir, as well, just to make sure that
you’re not getting any solid bits of wax in there. You know, there’s no lumps at all, so, helps speed up
the process a little bit. So now that your wax is melted, you’re going to need to
slowly lower the chain into the wax and leave
it for about 20 minutes or until there’s no
small bubbles appearing from the links and the
rollers of the chain. Our third question today
comes in from Steve Franklin. I’ve warped my front chain
ring whilst sprinting. Can you straighten them
or should it just be bent? Well Steve, first of all, that is a humble brag
and a half, isn’t it? Your herculean power has allowed
you to bend your chain ring whilst sprinting. Very impressive, indeed. Now what I would say here is
that it should be possible to straighten your chain ring
out gently with something like an adjustable spanner, however,
even once you’ve done that, it’s going to be weaker
than it was before, and given the impressive
number of watts you appear to be putting out, likely to
be bent very quickly again. So I would suggest replacing
this for a new one, possibly an Aero chain,
one’s that going to be a bit stiffer and possibly
with a 70-tooth chain ring, so you can really take
advantage of the watts that you seem to have in your legs. This other one came in
from mail underneath last week’s GCN Tech Clinic. Are gravel bikes that good,
or is the cycling industry PR one of the best campaigns ever? Well, it’s a very good
question and it is also a very common question. It goes hand-in-hand really,
with what’s the difference between a gravel bike
and a cyclocross bike? Now, the answer to that last
question is that in general, gravel bikes are geometry’s
not quite so aggressive which makes them a bit more
comfortable for long rides, and they’re generally a
bit more versatile as well, in terms of what wheels and tires you’re able to fit onto them. Is it just another excuse
to sell you another bike, by the bike industry? We can argue that one, either way really. I know a few people who’ve
bought a gravel bike and kept it on top of all the other bikes that they’ve got in their garage. But I’ve got a couple of friends at home who’ve bought a gravel bike
and got rid of a couple of their other bikes
because they found that with different wheel
choices, it’s able to cover most to rain and also
through all the seasons. Now, to give you an answer
as to whether one bike really can do it all, coming up is a video with a middle-aged man in
Lycra to give the answer. – This is the battle on the beach and I’ve been wantin’ to do it for ages. Part mountain bike race, part beach race, you start on sand tearing
down one of Wales’ longest beaches before then
looping back to the start through the forest
behind on like a mixture of double-track and single track. No one seems to know what
the best type of bike for this race actually is. A lot of 29 are mountain bikes, here, a fair few cyclocross bikes, and a couple of fat bikes. So this seems like
quite a good first test. – Moving on now to our
final three questions for this week, the first of
which is vaguely tech-related. It comes in from Hugo Carlos, again, underneath last
week’s tech clinic show. Where is the GCN app?
It is not showing for me on an Android phone. What I hear is a good excuse for me to talk about our brand new app which we launched very recently which uses Firebase and MongoDB and some kind of serverless architecture. Unfortunately, due to
complicated legal reasons, which are very much over my head, it’s not yet available
in every single country. But rest assured, we’re
working very hard on that and it should be
available world-wide soon. Now it’s safe to say we are
very excited about our app and the prospects it has in the future. Already, at the moment, it
is the best place to upload various photos, including things like your GCN inspirational photos or hacks and budgets for the GCN show, or indeed, pictures of your
bike for the GCN Tech Show so they can be rated nice or super-nice, or if it was myself inside presenting, nice or splendid, I
think was what we chose, but we’re probably never
be able to do the tech show for you again. Anyway, if you are yet to download it, I would encourage you to do so. We shall leave a link in the description just below this video. This next one was again
on Twitter from Rob Smith. Hi, I’m really sad that summer’s over. My winter bike is now
prepped and ready to go. Should I be doing anything
to my pride and joy summer ride before I put
it to bed for winter? I almost feel like breaking out into one of my favorite songs, Lana Del Ray, Summertime Sadness. Thankfully for you though, I won’t. Uh, you don’t need to do
too much to your summer bike you’ll probably enjoy it
before you store it away for your winter. All you just do is clean
it, make sure that’s its drive train is well
lubricated, after which you can store it in a place
which is cool but not too cold and also not too hot. I also recommend covering
it with something so that it doesn’t accidentally scratched over those winter months
and it should be ready to go once the weather gets
better early next year. Finally this week, this
came in from The TempestFox, I currently am running a claris groupset and I’d like to upgrade
my groupset to a 105. What parts do I need and
should I do it myself or give it to my local bike shop? Well, if you’re going to
upgrade your entire groupset you’re going to need all of the parts from that 105 groupset. I won’t go through all of those now. In terms of whether you or
the bike shop should do it, that depends on how
much experience you have as a mechanic, really. But I will tell you, it’s going
to be immensely satisfying for you if you do it yourself
through what you’ve learned here on GCN or GCN Tech
on our videos or indeed, what’s written out there online. In terms of the tools
that you’re going to need, well, you’ll need a chain
tool, you’re also going to need some kind of bottom bracket-fitting tool, a chainset-fitting tool,
some cable cutters. Beyond that, I think what
you’re really going to need is a four and a five millimeter Allen key. And again, if you do
manage to do it yourself, you’re going to find that
very satisfying, indeed. Uh, right, that looks like
that’s all for this week. As I mentioned before, you’ll
be left in the capable hands of Mr. Jon Cannings this time next week. So if you’ve got any
tech-related questions for him, please leave them in the
Comments section below using the hashtag askgcntech. And speaking of Jon, if you haven’t yet seen his latest video, which are the best upgrades
for less than 40 pounds which is about the same in
dollars and Euros these days, you’ll be able to find
that just over here.