Rebuilding my garage workshop for woodworking and tinkering

Rebuilding my garage workshop for woodworking and tinkering


It’s time for one last effort. One final attempt to nail this 540 before
we tear these freaking ramps out of the garage. You can call me a quitter, this is not how
I’m going down. There are just too many way to get hurt on
Berm Peak to spend another moment on this. So we’re moving forward. The garage ramps, if I’m being honest, are
a relic from 6 months ago when this was more space than I ever dreamed of. As most of you predicted the novelty wore
off quick, and we ended up using the storage under these ramps more than the ramps themselves. But luckily, they consist of large, flat pieces
of wood that are very easy to reuse. So when all is said and done, we’ll have
quite a bit of lumber for today’s project, along with a surplus of fasteners. Of course I didn’t go all the way to the
floor with the wood panels—that would have taken an extra 10 minutes. But after giving this space a good healthy
stare, I’m thinking it won’t matter. As we build a backyard bike park, this shop
expansion will need to address the shortcomings of our bike repair area. We built this section primarily for bike repair,
and it works great for that. But many of my larger tools have been left
without a home, and for woodworking projects we’ve been using the driveway. So today’s shop expansion will need to address
woodworking, general tinkering, and tool storage. That part is easy. Looking back on it, I kind of regret buying
these extra toolboxes—said no one ever. That takes care of tool storage, and some
extra workspace, but we can’t buy our way out of the rest of this project. We’re going to make the workbench a little
deeper because why not? But to get it to line up perfectly with the
old bench is something I have no prayer of doing by measuring. So, I’m tacking the backside of the new
bench-top to the existing structure, getting it level, and then scribing new legs for it. This eliminates guesswork, and ensures that
this new structure won’t look like the add-on that it is. But you’re probably thinking this bench
looks a little short, and that’s actually by design. We’re going to build a little shelf on the
end sized perfectly for this portable job site table saw. By making the table saw flush with the bench,
we’ve effectively created a workshop sized table saw for only $200. Well not exactly, but we will have a larger
area to stabilize wood coming off the backside of the saw. I’m also cobbling together an adapter for
this vacuum hose, so that it fits on the dust port of the table saw. The other end fits any 1-7/8” shop vac,
which both of mine are. I’m also doing this for the miter saw. This reduces the sawdust by about 75%, which
is fine for one or two cuts. But I’ll still need to open the doors for
those high production days. Before we work on the finishing touches, the
Diamondback banner needs to go in the bike area where it belongs. I’m liking the symmetry of this new wall
layout. With the overall structure of our shop complete,
it’s time to get organized. One of the great things about all these tool
boxes is that we’re gonna end up with a lot of empty drawers. That means we have room to grow. In the future, entire new categories of tools
can live here. And, our miscellaneous hardware is not so
miscellaneous anymore, thanks to this organizer I got at my local hardware store. We also bought a new tool, a drill press! Even this inexpensive drill press will greatly
increase the precision with which we can drill holes in stuff. I already have a few projects in mind. Because of the sawdust, I’ve positioned
our sander right next to the door, and hooked up a hose for good measure. And now that we have all our tools set up,
we can use them to continue working on the shop. When the ramps used to be here, we had an
easy way to load and unload bikes from the overhead rack. So we need a new way to get up and down the
bench. Since there’s a table saw up here, I’d
like to avoid ramps since Drama couldn’t resist the old one. Even at my last house I probably climbed on
to my workbench at least a few times per week to reach something up high or set up a camera,
so these stairs will have more uses than just reaching bikes. But with the loss of our ramps, we need to
ride down the stairs to unload bikes. Not a big deal, but we also lost the ability
to ride—back up the ramps. Well, we definitely lost the ability attempt
540’s, which is probably for the best. Behold, our new garage workshop, one of my
favorite home improvement projects to date. I’m gonna assume that very few of you are
sad to see the ramps go, since we rarely use them. And now we have a fully functioning wood shop
just steps away from the forest road. And with Spring only a month away, that’s
gonna come in handy. If you’re considering a garage reboot this
weekend, I left links to a few of the items we used today. If you found this entertaining, check out
my new channel, Berm Peak Express, where we take deep dives into more specific topics. I’m not gonna promise you’ll learn anything
though. Anyway, thanks for riding with me today and
I’ll see you next time.