Powermeters Of The Pro Peloton – What Brands Are Pro Cycling Teams Using In 2018?

Powermeters Of The Pro Peloton – What Brands Are Pro Cycling Teams Using In 2018?


(explosions) – It’s been a couple of
years since we last looked at power metres of the
pro peloton back in Dubai, but since almost all
of the WorldTour teams are present here in Abu Dhabi, we thought we would do an update. Also, because there’s quite a few changes. (moderate dubstep music) One of the few teams who are
still using SRM Power cranks are Team Bahrain Merida. And when we checked in last
year for a tech tour at Dubai, they were having the THM crank arms but they’ve changed this year to Look. Now these are a recent
collaboration with SRM and the unique things about
these cranks is that they have Trilobe Technology; and what
that means, that you can have three different crank
lengths with the same cranks. So 170, 172.5, and 175. And they’ve also got the SRM PC8 head unit in a rather bling gold colour which fits with the theme of the team. Now it’s been quite a
slow and steady shift over the last decade or two from pretty much all riders choosing SRM to other power metres companies, and I think part of the reason for that was that a lot of pros, I know firsthand, didn’t actually trust the
data or indeed the durability of some of the new power metre products. However, there are so many brands now that have done a lot of ensure that durability and accuracy
and so now we’re seeing lots of different power metres
on the pro riders’ bikes, and that’s kind of good news
for the rest of us really, because now the prices are beginning to get a bit more reasonable. The other teams that are
still using SRM power metres are Lotto Soudal here
who have them mounted to their Campagnolo
Super Record chainsets; and then the only other WorldTour team who are entirely using SRM power metres is the French squad AG2R
on their Factor bikes, and they’re using the same
cranks as Bahrain Merida, which are those Look carbon cranks. There’s been a slight change
at the Bora-Hansgrohe team, not in terms of the power
metres that they are using, because they are still 4iiii, despite this Specialised badge, and I should be going into
more detail about that a little bit later on in this video, but rather it is the head unit. They are one of two teams this year who are using the Wahoo units, which are what we choose
to use over at GNC as well. All the riders appear to be
using the Wahoo Element Bolt. And it’s not just Bora-Hansgrohe,
but also over at Katusha. This is the bike,
incidentally, of Marcel Kittel, who’s a new recruit
for the team this year. As you can see, it is a
full SRAM-equipped bike with the Red eTAP groupset and as such, the power metre that they
are using is from Quark, who come under the SRAM umbrella. The model is the Dzero, and
that has a claimed accuracy of plus or minus 1 1/2 %. And the big that they
say about these cranks is that they have compatibility of almost all bottom bracket standards, of which there are many. Spanish squad Movistar
are using power2max, and this is their NG model,
which is super accurate, plus or minus 1%, which really
is about as good as it gets for an on-bike power metre. The only time you’re going
to get better than that, if you’re in a sports laboratory. At the top they are all running
Garmin Edge 1030 head units, which is reasonably
unusual because normally if a team is running Garmin, for example, you’ll see a range of
different models depending on the size that each rider
likes to see in front of them, but here, they’re all using the same one, which does actually look very neat. (light contemporary soul) The biggest recent change to the power metres in the pro peleton is the introduction of
Shimano’s first ever power metre called the R9100-P, which you can see here on Team Sunweb’s bike. Now since 15 of the 18 WorldTour squads are running Shimano
gears, it’s not a surprise to see quite a few of them
already adopting this model. That said, they are in quite short supply, not just for the general
public to purchase them, but also for the teams to use. So Sunweb, for example,
are currently using a combination of the Shimano power metre but also their previous
Pioneer sponsor as well. Now this adds 70 grammes to
the standard Dura-Ace crankset. It is dual sided with an
accuracy of plus or minus 2% while it is only running one battery; the two sides are connected
via a wire, which is handy, because you’ve only got
one thing to charge then. It’s compatible with Bluetooth and ANT+, and what they are linking it to is a brand new computer to
the pro peloton as well; that is the Sigma Rox 11.0 GPS. That’s a new deal for Team Sunweb which will go through the next few years. Currently though they are
all mounted to the stem as opposed to an out-front mount. There’s a bit of intrigue around Team Quick-Step’s power metres for 2018, because they’ve previously been on 4iiii. This year it looks like they
kind of are still on 4iiii, but with Specialised
branding; this drive-side part is unmistakably a 4iiii power metre. However, the non-drive-side
looks slightly different to what we’ve seen from
that company before, which makes you think perhaps Specialised are thinking of acquiring the company, or maybe they’re thinking of
making their own power metre, because the Global Triathlon
Network, our sister channel, recently went to have a look
at Vicky Holland’s bike, and that looked like a proper Specialised crank-based power metre. So it does seem like the big
company that is Specialised might be the latest to delve into a rather busy power-meter market. Meanwhile the head units
that they are using are fairly standard Garmins;
they’ve got the K-Edge mounts, which are very popular actually amongst a lot of the WorldTour teams here. And again they have a
choice amongst the riders between a different size of head units. Team Sky have been long-term
users of Stages power metres, and the vast majority of the
riders’ bikes here in Abu Dhabi are still using that power metre, mainly the dual-sided one. However, their agreement with
that company is non-exclusive, and so we have seen a few bikes
here from Team Sky riders, such as this one of Sebastian Henoa, which are also using
the new Shimano R9100-P. Up at the top, we have
got Garmin head units with the majority of the bikes
here using K-Edge mounts. We’ve got Danny van Poppel’s bike now; he’s moved from Team Sky to be
with LottoNL-Jumbo for 2018. They are all using Pioneer
power metres and head units, and the reason I’ve got my phone here is because the names of them
are not particularly catchy. So the crankset, the dual-sided
one that we have here, is the SGY-PM910V
Pedalling Monitor Sensor, and then the head unit that
we have here at the front is the SGX-CA500. Now Pioneer are the only power metre that measures both force
direction and force magnitude, which it does 12 times per revolution. The accuracy of this power
metre is plus or minus 2%, so pretty standard there. The battery is not rechargeable, but it is a CB2032,
which is pretty common, and it lasts for around about 180 hours. Yet another company to have
entered the power metre market are FSA, although they’ve done so in partnership with power2max. This is Miguel Angel Lopez’s bike; he’s riding for Team Astana
and they’re all using these PowerBox power metres. Plus or minus 2% is the accuracy of these, and they say that the battery life is a quite incredible 400 hours. They’ve all got them on the
K-Force Light carbon cranksets, but they are available to go
on the aluminium cranksets at a much lower price. Here all of the riders are
using Garmin head units, some with an out-front mount, although Lopez has gone old school; that’s the mount there on the stem. Team Dimension Data are the only squad to be using a Rotor power metre. This, as you can very well see, is the bike of Mark Cavendish, and they’re all running
the Rotor 2INpower model, which measures left and
right power independently using four opposed strain gauges. As well as the strain
gauges, inbuilt into this is an accelerometer, which
measures angular velocity around 500 times per revolution. And what that means,
is that if you so wish, you can get some very detailed
pedalling dynamics analysis. And to do that, you can
link up this power metre via Bluetooth to your
smartphone or tablet. There is a rechargeable battery which is located in the spindle, and a full charge gives you around about 250 hours of ride time. This power metre adds about 170 grammes to the normal crank weight. Up at the top, they are also
using Garmin Edge head units. No 1030s on display,
although I think they do have that as a choice, but
it’s mainly 520s and 820s. And then there’s a combination
of Rotor’s own mount and also some from ENVE. The other team that are using power2max are Team UAE Emirates, and like Movistar they are using the NG
model on their bikes, combined with a Garmin
head unit at the front. We have a combination of power metres here at Team EF Education First –
Drapac presented by Cannondale. First up on Pierre Rolland’s bike is the SRM unit mounted onto
the Cannondale SiSL2 crankset. These have been around
for quite some time, but they’ve always had
a high claimed accuracy of plus or minus 1%, which
was the best in the field before power2max came
along with their NG model, which equaled it. And a lot of that, they claim, is down to the stiffness
of the Cannondale cranks. Meanwhile, lots of the
riders are also using Gamin Vector 3 pedals;
it’s kind of a 50-50 split over here in Abu Dhabi. The head units are all
Garmin, and they’re also using Garmin’s own mounts on the handlebars. Mitchelton-Scott are yet another team who are gradually making the transition from SRM over to Shimano. But again, they haven’t quite
got their hands on enough to give everybody in the
team the new power metre so a few people are still
on the old Dura-Ace cranks and an SRM power metre. Up at the top, they too are
using Garmin head units. Trek Segafredo are
exactly the same situation as Mitchelton-Scott, gradually going over to the Shimano power metre, and they too are using Garmin head units. The mounts for them come
from Bontrager themselves, so a rather neat looking thing here on the front of the road stems, and an equally neat one that goes on the top of the time trial bars. Team BMC are a squad who use Shimano groupsets and also wheels,
so it’s not a surprise to see they too have gone over to the Shimano R9100-P power metre, although you can still
see few of the older SRMs, like on the time trial bike
of Joey Rosskopf back there. With that change of power
metres have also come a change of head units for Team BMC, who have always been on SRM. They are now using Garmin. Along with all the WorldTour
teams there are also three Pro Continental
squads here in Abu Dhabi, and the first team we’ve
come to visit is Bardiani. They are using these power pedals, which are Favero Assioma,
which is an update to their previous model,
which were the bePRO pedals which we saw a couple
of years ago in Dubai. They have a claimed accuracy
of plus or minus 2%, which is up there with the
best on-bike power metres. It’s rechargeable via USB, which is handy, and each charge gives a total of around 50 hours of riding time. Slightly easier to fit than
the previous model as well, which needed a special tool; with these, you can just use the standard
eight-millimeter Allen key. And up front for the head unit, that is supplied by Polar,
which is the M460 model which they released in
the middle of last year. The remaining two invited teams here, Novo Nordisk and Gazprom-RusVelo, are both using SRM cranks
along with SRM head units. And then there’s one WorldTour squad who aren’t present here in Abu Dhabi, that being the French squad FDJ; they were actually the first team to use Shimano’s new
power metre last year, and so not surprised to see
them continuing that in 2018. So quite a shift in terms
of power metres on pro bikes away from SRM, and a lot more diversity in terms of the number of brands present on pro riders’ bikes. Garmin have long been the dominant factor in the head unit market at the pro level, although it is interesting to see that the likes of Wahoo and Sigma are starting to sponsor teams as well, so that could be the next big
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