Peter Sagan’s Aluminium Race Bike | Specialized Allez Sprint Disc

Peter Sagan’s Aluminium Race Bike | Specialized Allez Sprint Disc


– This is the Specialized
Allez Comp Sprint Disc of Pete Sagan of the Bora Hansgrohe Team and yep, you’ve guessed
right, it’s an aluminum bike. He’s gonna be using it later on in the Tour Down Under Classic Criterium. His teammates, well, they’re
hovering in the background. They’re ready to go out for a ride on it so I’ve gotta be quick but I’m looking forward
to checking this one out. (loud wooshes) Staring with the most obvious change from Sagan’s normal road bike, we’ve got the Allez Sprint Disc frame. The Allez Sprint was launched back in 2015 as a bike made for criterium
racers on a budget. It basically allows you to go out and race a properly top-end race bike without having to worry about destroying a super expensive carbon
bike if you were to crash. The bit that really sets the Allez Sprint apart from the competition is the D’Alusio Smart Weld technology that moves the welds
away from normal points, as you can see here. Specialized claims that this leads to greater stiffness and improved comfort over traditionally-welded aluminum bikes. Sagan, he chose to ride
a 56 centimeter frame with the silver paint jobs that fades into the Bora Hansgrohe Team
green around the seat tube. I’ve got to say, I really think
this is a great looking bike because those colors, they popped out across the mechanics’ area
at the Tour Down Under. Now finally, the frameset comes
with a fat carbon fiber fork from Specialized that is
actually the same fork that comes with the top of
the range Specialized Tarmacs and that is finished in
the same metallic silver as the rest of the bike. (hypnotic trance music) Let’s move on then to the
other really big thing to talk about with this bike, the wheels and the tires. Sagan’s bike is fitted with the super aero 64 millimeter deep Roval CLX64 wheels. But the three-time world champion doesn’t race on the stock
wheels, of course, because, well, he’s had the bearings upgraded
to Ceramic Speed ones. So trying to ring out every
little bit of speed possible. Now, you might’ve noticed
that Sagan’s bike appears to still have the locknuts
around the valves. But oh no, this bike is actually
fitted with tubeless tires. It’s pretty much unheard of for the pros to ride
tubeless tires in races, so this is a pretty big
move by Bora Hansgrohe. And while they weren’t using them for any other races there
at the Tour Down Under, just this one particular race. The wheels, they are actually
fitted with a pair of Specialized Turbo Rapid Air
tires in 26 millimeter width. Moving on to the drivetrain, well, Sagan’s bike is fitted
with the pretty much standard Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 groupset, this one being the 9170 model. And he’s got an 11 to 28 cassette fitted, which is the most
popular amongst the pros. Upfront, Sagan has chosen the
non-standard 54-39 chainset, which is useful to give
him just that extra gear in a top-end sprint. And he’s gone for size
172.5 millimeter cranks. Fitted to the chainset is
a Specialized power meter that we first spotted at the
Tour Down Under last year and it’s also fitted with a
Ceramic Speed bottom bracket too and a pair of Shimano
Dura-Ace 9100 SPD-SL pedals. Brakes, Sagan is using the Shimano Dura-Ace 9170 hydraulic discs and, as is increasingly
common in the pro peloton, he opts for 140 millimeter
rotor at the back and a 160 millimeter in the front. That way, he gets better braking
performance at the front, where you really do need it. (laid back hip hop music) As Sagan has done for
a number of years now, Sagan chooses a massive 150
millimeter Zipp Sprint SL stem with the logos covered up, as Bora Hansgrohe aren’t
sponsored by Zipp themselves. Now I can’t confirm this, but apparently one of the reasons that Sagan
still chooses to use that stem is that he likes the
12 degrees rise on it. Now connected to the
front plate of the stem is the K-Edge Wahoo Elemnt
bolt and front mount. Connected also to the
stem are a set of the S-Works Aerofly bars in
42 centimenters width. Now the bars, they’re
wrapped in the very grippy Supacaz Super Sticky Kush bar tape, that’s quite a mouthful. And Sagan also opts for a
set of the Sprint shifters, set up just below the
Dura-Ace Di2 brake levers, there on the drops. Moving backwards, connected
to the S-Works FACT carbon seatpost is the
Specialized Romin Evo saddle. And then stuck to the back of the seatpost is a number holder that, interestingly, hasn’t got any tape or zip ties to make sure it stays stuck on. The mechanics instead, well,
they clearly trust their glue. Finally, Sagan uses Tacx Ciro bottle cages and also has a K-Edge chain catcher fitted to the front derailleur. Measurements-wise, well,
let’s take a look at them. Well, from the center
of the bottom bracket to the top of the saddle,
that’s 76 centimeters. And from the tip of the saddle to the center of the bars, 62.5. And the weight of it? A very respectable 7.84 kilos. There we are, let me know
what you think of this bike down there in the comment section. I think it’s fantastic that Sagan is taking to the start line, along with a couple of his teammates, for the first kind of opening
big race of the season. So get involved in the comment section. Don’t forget too to like
and share this video with your friends. Give it a big old thumbs up. And also check out the GCN shop at shop.globalcyclingnetwork.com. And now for another great video, how ’bout clicking just down here? I better give this one back to Peter now. He’s not happy.