New SRAM Eagle AXS & RockShox Reverb AXS Wireless MTB Groupset | GMBN Tech First Look

New SRAM Eagle AXS & RockShox Reverb AXS Wireless MTB Groupset | GMBN Tech First Look


– Over the last year, we’ve seen some really cool technical
developments from SRAM, on the bikes of some of the worlds fastest and best riders. In particular, that elusive black box
wireless transmission set up. Now black box is a technical
development program, used by SRAM and RockShox ultimately to refine and bring to market
very specific products. Now, I’ve been waiting with
bated breath because today, is a really cool day for Matwood Tech. SRAM AXS is finally here. Luckily for us, we’ve been able to work with SRAM in order to get the full technical low down on the worlds first wireless
electronic transmission for mountain bikes. (upbeat techno music) Like all technical kit, products like SRAM AXS take many years of development and testing. Now, we’ve seen several incarnations of this SRAW AXS system
over the last year alone. Including the set up that we
seen on Nino Schurter’s bike, we seen several different
options throughout the year. But there’s also been setups spotted on Emily Batty’s bike. Mitch Ropelato was running a reverb post, trying to get operated Crank
Works, earlier in the year. And we’ve even found out
now that Jaroslav Kulhavy was actually racing and riding
electronic stuff years ago. So we’ve got a lot of
secretive development. But enough of that stuff, let’s take a look at the
production SRAM AXS set up. So let’s start at the cockpit of the bike with the Eagle AXS Controller. Now sitting underneath
the bar is much like a traditional gear shift lever. The AXS controller is very
neat and very ergonomic. Now you might note that I’m referring to it as a controller and not a shifter. I think it’ll be strange to
refer to it as a shifter, given the fact it is a fly
by wireless top device. There’s no cables, there’s no mechanics involved in this. But there are 6 notable points
with the AXS controller. It’s wireless. Well, this is pretty obvious
but look how cool it is. Look how minimal and neat it is. It’s very quiet too. Now you don’t realize how much noise your gear and transmission cables make when they’re just rubbing and
knocking against each other. Until you suddenly remove them. So, the main paddle itself. Now although very different
to your regular shifter, this position and shape is actually very logical and very intuitive to use. There’s two touch points, up and down. The Sprint Paddle or as
SRAM liked to call it, the Secretive Sprint Paddle. This you can nudge with the knuckle of your index finger without removing or releasing your grip on the bars. This is an absolutely amazing feature for those downshifts when you’re really sprinting under power. Think you run into and
actually woke up finish line or maybe the end of Enduro stage when you’re absolutely gun spacing. Doosh, doosh, doosh, doosh, doosh. That’s the way. Fully customizable. Now,the beauty of a controller system is that you can assign
any of those touch points to do exactly what you want them to do. You don’t have to stick to it, in the default settings. It’s kind of like shortcut keys on your camera or your keyboard. Or even just customizing the face on your smartphone. So you got all the apps and stuff exactly where you want them. Really, really, cool. Power. Well, it barely uses any power because it’s just the controller. It’s powered by a small CR2032 battery, the type that you see in a lot of watches. It powers down when it’s not needed and it’s going to last 2 years. And lastly on the AXS controller system, is the pairing button. Simply this is so you can pair up with other components
within the AXS ecosystem. And it also means that you do have the ability to adjust trim. In a very similar way that you would do the barrel adjust on a
traditional cable set up. Next up is the Eagle AXS derailleur. Although the controller is very cool, the derailleur is actually
where the brains are. Despite how much tech is
crammed into this unit, it’s actually very simple to set up and even more simple to use. Visually the Eagle AXS derailleur, shares a lot of similarities with the conventional Eagle make. But there’s actually
quite a lot of details they’re quite significantly different. The cage itself is 10 millimeters shorter and the actual position
of the upper guide rail, notice the chains have
increased wrap around on that cassette. And of course the battery unit itself is mounted on the back of the derailleur. It’s out of harms way there. The battery lasts for 20 hours, it takes 1 hour to charge, and it’s compatible with
all the other batteries. They’re all the same
within the AXS ecosystem. You can hot swap these batteries too. So there’s no messing around
or having to repair anything. You can literally take the battery off and plug another one straight in. If you are unlucky enough for it to run out when you are out on the trail, the derailleur will stay
in the last used gear. Of course you can just swap in a battery from your reverb and continue riding. And yes, of course it is
completely water proof too. So there’s not issues at all with riding and racing in foul conditions and jet washing your bike afterwards. The units are designed to withstand up to IP 69k standards. That’s the sort of stuff
that construction gear, we’re talking drills and stuff you see on building sites has
to adhere to in order to be used outdoors in
demanding conditions. The only thing you have to make sure of, is the battery is either
on or you have one of the blanks in place
when washing your bike. Now as far as adjustment goes, there’s 3 main points of
adjustment on a derailleur. There’s the B screw or
the B tension screw. They’re the same as any other derailleur, for setting the height
of the upper guide rail in relation to the larger
sprocket on the cassette. There’s also upper and lower limit screws. Now, although it’s a good idea
to have these properly set, the controller will only
enable the derailleur to move within specific limits. That actually is not
that much of a problem. The only other adjustment of course, is the pairing button
which is used in order to pair with the controller
and other components within the AXS ecosystem. It’s also used in conjunction
with the controller if you need to adjust the trim at all while you’re on the
trail or any other time. Shifting is absolutely instant, it’s so fast and so punchy, it doesn’t matter how much load is going through that system. Bang, bang. Through the gears. Much faster, much punchier and much more predictable
than a conventional system. As far as noise goes, the mech make’s some sort of really cool electronic zippy noises. But really the whole system
doesn’t make any noise at all. Just think when the clutch
derailleur first came out, it was a game changer. Now it’s like that all over again. Now probably the coolest feature as far as I’m concerned
on the AXS re-derailleur is actually a protection system. So it’s called the over load clutch. So there is already a clutch unit on the lower sprung cage in order to help with chain retention and
keeping things quiet. The overload clutch is specifically there to protect the motor. So if you were to strike the cage on say a rock or in a crash, something like that. You could damage the motor
if the clutch wasn’t there. Now the clutch simply
disengages everything and allows the case to
move out of harms way. And a few seconds later, it will return back to
the position you were in before that impact. That’s smart. And of course there’s
the reverb AXS as well. So this is a brand new
seat post from RockShox. It’s the RockShox Reverb AXS
and it’s wireless as well. It has it’s own dedicated controller up on the bars on the left hand side there. Which like everything
else is customizable, we’ll get to that in a minute. The seat post itself has
a brand new IFP design, it’s a low friction design. It’s far lower friction than previous seat posts by RockShox. It’s also got a couple of
other really cool features and some slight differences. One of those features is
vent valve technology. At some point you or one
of your riding buddies will probably be unlucky enough to have the dreaded bounce in a seat post. What happens there is effectively against the wrong side of the IFP and it results in having to have a service
to get your post sorted out. Not any more with the
vent valve technology. You simply remove the post. using that vent valve you can effectively bleed that air out. You compress the post, pull
it back in, good to go. There’s no adjustable return speed now. So one of the features that
RockShox Reverb Seatpost has been known for is having that, effectively
a barrel adjuster to adjust the rebound speed of
the seat post as it extends. Now of course, most people would run the
seatpost out at full speed because you want it to be
reactive in the way you wanna ride so RockShox have done away with this. It’s not needed and
it’s set at the factory on the fastest setting now. I can tell you, it feels
faster than before, more predictable than before, and the action is phenomenal. Now as well as being
an electronic operation and being wireless and
all the other stuff, the thing that’s so outstanding about it is how instant you can drop that seatpost. Now whether you’re using a
hydraulic RockShox Reverb or you’re using a cable operated post, there is a delay when you engage the lever or the drop lever in order to actuate the seatpost. On this, there is no delay at all. You literally tap that button
with the tiniest bit of effort and it’s infinitely adjustable
within it’s travel as well. Well of course, it’s wireless. So this is a true plug and place seatpost. Not all that internal routing
fluff that really does give you rage in the workshop. You can plug and play, you can
put this on any of your bikes nice and easy. Of course the controller,
supper easy to unplug using a matchmaker system and bash it on another bike. Now as far as battery goes, it’s the same battery
as you see on the rest of the AXS system, which means you can swap them around, it’s hot-swappable like
the rest of the system, taking an hour to recharge. And they last between
40 and 60 hours of use, depending on how trigger happy you are. Now the clamp design
at the top of the post is very different, so in order to house the
motor and the battery system at the top, the previous twin bolt system could no longer be used, so I had to go for a single bolt system. Single bolt systems
aren’t always the best, but RockShox has refined this. Now, the single bolt on the side is purely there to clamp the system down. There’s also another bolt at the front which adjusts the pitch, so there’s no slipping with this system. Now finally, the last thing
is the control itself, so there’s a dedicated
controller that sits on the left hand side of the bars with a single paddle. Like the right hand unit
designed for the derailleur, it’s incredibly active,
it’s supper easy to use, it’s really minimal, and it’s in the exact
place you want it to be. But, the cool thing is, like the rest of the AXS system, you can have it your way. You can assign it to different levers and different functions, something I’m going to show
you about with the app. If you use the app, then that really unlocks the potential of what you can do and
what you can imagine this system is going to be
able to do in the future. Now the app is a fairly
simple thing to use. You open it up, you
pair it with the system, you put in all your rider details, like your name, your bikes,
and all this sort of stuff. And if you have various systems, you can name them and assign
different things to them. Now using the app, this is the supper cool thing, you can assign any of the
paddles and touch points to do different things. Now, for example, the drop-a-post controller sits on the left hand side if the bars, but you don’t have to
use it for that feature. You could have this set for down-shifts, and have the right hand
paddle set for up-shifts, and the top part of the right hand paddle, that could be operating your dropper post. Just think of the opportunities
for how you can customize a setup to really suit the way you wanna ride the bike. Super cool. Now, who’s it for? Well, immediately the thing
that stands out to me, that this has been designed for ultimate shifting performance. It’s not just tech that’s been developed for the sake of making it wireless. This is to make shifting better, more positive, and of course, ultimately customizable. Okay, sure, it’s not cheap by any means. It’s not trying to be cheap. This is a premium product
and it really does sit in that super bike category. So there’s two models in the range. There’s XX1 and X01. XX1 is aimed firmly at the
cross country races out there, and it has titanium hardware on there and it has a carbon cage. Now the X01 is aimed
more at the Enduro rider or someone that wants
something that’s a little bit more robust. It’s got full stainless
hardware and aluminum, forged aluminum, jockey
wheel cage on there. Now the XX1 transmission is actually about 70 to 80 grams lighter
than the original 11 speed SRAM XX1 transmission. And its about 15 grams lighter
than the Eagle XX1 setup, whereas X01 is about five grams lighter. So what does the system cost? Well obviously there’s
various price points for various products here. So the Reverb post itself, that retails for about 800 dollars. The XX1 transmission retails
for about 2100 dollars and the X01 at 1900 dollars. Now is it compatible with
other AXS components, like the road stuff. The good news here is yes. Anything is cross compatible
within the whole range or ecosystem of AXS components. So, for example, you could have the AXS Reverb Seatpost, put it on a gravel bike, and you could use those little blip-box, little buttons you could get on the road, equivalent with the AXS
system in order to operate it. Now that is super cool. Now again, something else
so exciting about this is what the future holds
for things like the wireless AXS system. You’ve only got to think that how your smart devices, your phones, your watches, your devices on your bike, how they’re all gonna
start interacting together and learning and gathering data. This is super cool and super interesting, not only for being able
to customize everything, but for what sort of scope there
is for future developments. Now, I’d imagine that the data gathering is gonna start analyzing sort of things like
your shifting patterns, the gears you use most, they might even be able
to make recommendations on the the best size
chaining for your bike, for your power, and what you use. I think this is just incredible. And this is only the start of something. Of course the app is going to see later firmware updates and alterations as time goes on. And there’s surely going
to be further products that are compatible within the AXS system. If this is what the future holds for tech in mountain biking, then I am all in. I love the fact that it’s adaptable, I love the fact it’s customizable, I love the fact it learns things as you’re using it. I think its really intuitive and it’s a very, very smart piece of kit. But I’d love to know what
you think of SRAM AXS. Make no mistakes, this is
a super high performance product. It’s not designed to
be there for everyone, it’s not designed to filter
down to budget price points, this is the ultimate, the premium thing. Let us know what you think of SRAM AXS in those comments below and we can pickup that conversation. Now if you want to see what
Neil’s got to say about it, check out his video
over on GMBN right here, and if you love what SRAM are doing, give us a huge thumbs up and don’t forget to click
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