Long Or Short Travel For Trail Riding? | Ask GMBN Tech

Long Or Short Travel For Trail Riding? | Ask GMBN Tech


– Ok, welcome back to
another Ask GMBN Tech. This is the 17th show and
this is a weekly show where hopefully we get to answer
all your tech related mountain bike questions. You can get your questions
into us in the comments below this very video. We’ll be patrolling that afterwards. Also, you can send them in
with the email address listed at the bottom of the screen there. Don’t forget to use the hashtag, #AskGMBNTech if you’re
sending in e-mails or you’re contacting us via Facebook. Just makes it easier for us to spot what you’re trying to get. The first up is from Carl. Hi guys, I am in the market
for a new 29er trail bike. I was at a bike store and
the guy there recommended a Giant Anthem 29er for trail riding. He said it got 100 mm of travel but it’s got Fox Suspension
on the front and rear. It’s the only bike in my price range with full Fox suspension. Would you say this would be
a good bike for trail riding or should I look at a
different bike if so, what would you recommend? Well firstly, technically
the Anthem is an XC bike so that’s by Giant. It’s 100 mm travel and it was designed originally for
the world cup basically so all those boys and girls
are riding the giant Anthem. It is a very trail friendly
bike and its 29″ wheels do make it feel like it rides
with slightly more travel than it has and it certainly
gonna be robust enough for a day to day trail use but their trail focus bike from Giant is actually called the Trance. It’s got quite a lot more travel. It’s gonna ride a lot differently. I mean, if you’re not
really into sort of riding that involves loads of jumping and sort of aggressive terrain, I’d be more than happy riding the Anthem. But don’t forget, whatever bike you’re riding, you can go out and ride trails on them, you can ride cross-country on them. Don’t be too sort of confined
by what the bike tells you to do. It’s only at the upper end of
the scale where you shouldn’t really go downhill racing
on a cross-country bike. You’re clearly gonna damage that bike. So in a long way ’round to your answer, yeah, the Anthem is absolutely fine. Enjoy it. Next up is a brake related
question from Doug Watts. Well, it’s not really a question, it’s, Hope V4 versus Shimano Saint Brakes. To be honest, they’re
both excellent brakes. I like them both. I haven’t ridden Hope
brakes for quite some time. I’d quite like to try and see
’em again to sort of remind myself of them. I always used to run Hope
brakes back in my magazine days. Always love them, especially
the color options, and the customizations
you can do with them. I like the fact that
they got braided hoses. They’re really tough. Especially good if you’re into crashing because they’re quite robust
for that sort of thing. But then, the Shimanos, they’re incrediblly powerful. Perhaps almost too powerful for my liking. I prefer something not quite
as grabby as the Saint. I found to be honest the SLX
is absolutely fine or the XT or something like that. But I’ve got that characteristic,
wooden sort of Shimano feel with the really small lever blade, that’s really comfortable. They’re both excellent, of course the Hopes use DOT fluid and the Shimano uses Mineral fluid. They’re both very easy and
quite similar to bleed actually. I’m not sure. Depends what sort of build you’re doing. The Shimanos are no nonsense. They work. Never gonna let you
down, any of that stuff. But Hope certainly a lot tricker. Next up is from Heath Norton, cool name. I bought a 24″ Rocky Mountain
Bike for my daughter. It’s a nice frame with
some decent components, but the front fork is
a cheap SunTour unit. She only weighs about 55lbs, so the fork doesn’t
really activate for her. That is a bit of a
problem with some of these kids’ bike I found as well actually. Have been looking at upgrading her fork, but I’ve not found any good options. Is it possible to rework
her fork to make it more responsive at the lower end or should I just upgrade it? Are there any good fork
options for 24″ bikes? I’ve heard Old Rockshox
Sid Forks can work, but the bike has V-brakes
and integrated levers and shifters, so it would be expensive
to upgrade to disc brakes. Plus, I’ve not been able to find any 26 to 24 V-brake adapters. Okay so first start with the tuning. I’m not entirely familiar
with the 24″ Suntour forks but must suspension tuners, you’d be amazed at the magic
that they can work on those to make them feel good. I’d have to ask a few questions
to some of the guys I know to work that one out. So let’s just move on to the next bit. Yeah, I think you’re right
about the Rock Shox Sid Forks. I heard that as well. It’s quite old cross-country
fork its quite low the axle to crown height. It’s probably going to be
fairly similar to that 24″ fork. Course most kids’ mountain
bike these days do come with 26″ forks with a 24 in there, so you don’t have to worry about that sort of thing in the future. I definitely would recommend
in trying that out. I think that’d be a good option but you would have to
get disc brakes for that. I wouldn’t worry about
spending too much money on that because you wouldn’t need to do anything with the integrated shift or brake lever ’cause you could just get
a cable operated brake caliber and a rotor. You may need a front wheel there. Of course that is an expense. The Shimano do the deal caliber. They’re around 40 quid. They’re not a lot of money and
the disc rotor you get there are for about 10 quid. 50 quid for a brake. I appreciate the
fact it’s a kid bike, you don’t want to spend
too much money on it, but that is one way around that issue. The other thing just to factor
in is upgrading the fork full stop up to another one. Now of course, the only thing
you really need to take into consideration is that
axle to crown height so literally from the axle to the crown, where the crown race of
the head sits on there. Now if you’re replacing
it with a 26″ wheel fork, you really want to make sure
you don’t want to go above say, anything above 20MM longer, really is gonna sort of mess
up the handling quite a lot. You can probably get away
with up to 20MM on a kids bike and won’t be too adverse. Of course, you’ll get a
fork that will hopefully be a lot more responsive
and work better for her. Next up from Joel Reilly. Hi guys, love the show. I ride a 2009 Santa Cruz XC Blur. Yes. Nice bike, mate. Ride it hard because I’m
more of a rider who takes the fun line instead of the fast one. Should I get a new trail 150MM
bike or something bigger, or smaller? My Santa Cruz is about 11.2
kilos and my dad says I’ll miss it if I get something
with bigger travel, that’s heavier. If I were to get a trail
bike, it’ll be around $2000. I live in South Africa
by the way, by the beach. And I’m 15. Well, wicked. Love your country for starters. I really enjoyed our recent
trip out to South Africa. I do think your dad is
quite right actually. So most of the mountain
bikers we met when we were in South Africa were also
cross-country trail riders. They’re all running either
hard tails or suspension bikes like your Santa Cruz blow, with around 100MM of travel. Now, I don’t think that you A) probably need any more travel. You’ve been riding it for so long. But you could, if you want to
make your bike a little bit more fun, make it feel a little bit more aggressive, don’t have to spend
the earth on the thing. You could upgrade the
fork or maybe get your fork travel extended. Depending on what fork you have on there, that might just be a case
of getting the air tube This is inside the fork,
get a slightly longer one. Which would require doing
a service on the fork, but it’s a cool way of just
getting a bit more travel out what you had. So on a 100MM bike, you can get away with 120MM fork. By the time it sags, you probably be only a little
bit longer than the standard fork length on there but it
gives you the extra 20MM of travel to play with. Which can make quite
a bit of a difference. If you do that, of course, you might end up having to
put your stem down slightly. Maybe one 10mm spacer just
to compensate for that and you might need to tip
the nose of your saddle down. If you go for any more travel, it really will mess up
the handling of that bike and that’s a really nice bike. Just bare that in mind. Now I’ve also just written a note to myself here about the Yeti SB100, which we talked about on the show a week or two back. Now that’s a 100MM travel XC frame but its spec with a 120MM fork. I’ve also seen the brand
new Santa Cruz Blur. 100MM travel, also being
spec with a 120MM fork. I think actually, that’s
gonna be a sort of quite magical start of
a bike for lot of riders over the coming years. Now we often see people on
trail bikes that have 150MM, even 170MM with travel. I think people are probably
a little bit over biked for what they need. Don’t get me wrong. This is a fun game and it’s
important to be having fun. By all means, ride whatever you wanna ride but I do think that a
longer travel bike can isolate you from the trail a little bit. The thing about riding a
short travel bike like that 100MM blur you’ve got is. You got more than enough travel to get you out of trouble. Also, you got enough travel
to get you enough traction on those trails to really hammer it on but you’ll still gonna
be able to feel the trail underneath the wheels. As for me, that’s one
of the things I love. It’s about fun at the end of the day. If you want to go really fast and that’s how you need to do it, then that’s great, good for you. If you want to have fun in a different way, which sounds like you do, carry on doing what you’re doing. Maybe just like a slightly
longer fork though. It’ll save you money on buying a bike. However, if you do want to buy a new bike and you are looking for something. I’d say 120, 130MM is
something you should buy. Just for example, just throwing this up on the screen now. It’s a Canyon Neuron. It’s available in both
27.5″ wheels and 29″ wheels. It got several different
price options on there and there’s one right in your price point. Maybe that could be the
right sort of bike for you. Hope you make the right choice. Hi Doddy, I have a setup question. I currently am running
on a 35MM Onza Stem on my Commencal V4 All Mountain Meta. When I’m climbing trails, I
find the front wheel lifts and trying to do a wheelie. Would a slightly longer reach
stem solve this problem? Thanks, Tim. Yeah, it completely would. There’s a few reasons that
this could be happening of course this all stands as one but let’s start with the saddle. If your saddle is too far back, you’re going to be too far
over the rear balance point, which when you’re climbing, there’s a rear axle of that bike. You want your body
weight in front of that, or at least try to keep it that way. So of course, by having a shorter stem, if your bike is not long enough, then you’re gonna be too far past towards the rear of the bike. In which case, a longer stem
would definitely correct that. However, that will change
the handling of your bike. By putting a longer stem on there, you are gonna feel that
it’s gonna be harder to pick the front wheel up, for stuff like manuals, or the bunny hop. So you do need to sorta
have to do this gently and play around. See if your friends have
any slightly longer stems. Maybe a 50. That’s not gonna interfere
too much with it. Also consider the height
you have your stem out. The higher the stem, the
shorter your bike effectively is because of the angle of that head tube, So the lower the stem, slightly more reach you’re
gonna get out of that bike. It’s only a sort of effective thing, not actually an official measurement with the way reach is measured but you can eek out a little
bit more length on the same length stem. Of course, changing your stem
is going to cost you a bit of money to do that. So try a few if you do that, a
different setup things first. Now of course, if you do find that you need to add a stem that’s over 50MM in length, then it might be a case
that the bike might be a bit too short for you. Which is quite often the case with people. They buy it because
they want it to be fun, flickable, on those trails, but quite often to get that, you have to have a bike
that’s on the smaller side but they may be fun on
those jumpy fun trails, it’s never gonna climb or pedal as well as a bike that truly fits you. So hopefully, you can figure
this out with a slightly longer stem. Maybe tweaking the saddle so
it’s slightly further forward. Perhaps even just rolling
it your bike forward and lowering your stem. It might get your bike dialed in. Hopefully that’s the case, just a slightly longer stem
might cure your climbing issue. Tubeless related now, this one is from Hayley Clark. Hi Doddy, I have a 2015 Cube
Stereo and want to go tubeless. However, my wheels take
Schrader valves, big ones. That’s a car valve basically, if anyone wondered what that is. Would the regular Tubeless Presta valves, like the ones in your
tubeless video, work? And if so, which ones or
am I stuck with tubes? Thanks for the help. You’ve helped me work on my bike at home on several occasions. Well, great. So I’m gonna help you again
now because you don’t need to worry about this. There’s a few options out there. On the screen now, Firstly, Stan’s NoTubes. The company Stan’s did the first proper conversion kit for tubeless. They have valves in both Presta, which I showed you in that vid there. And also in Schrader, which
are the ones you need. Now they do two versions, the 10MM and the 12MM, Just depends on the
drilling of your rims so check that out. Also, they do an adapter and the adapter plugs the hole in the rim, and then you can run a
regular Presta one in there, so that’s one way around it. Also, there’s another
company, Joe’s No-Flats. Very similar name to Stan’s No-Tubes. Joe’s No-Flats make Schrader
tubeless valves as well so you should be able to get some of those and get your bike setup tubeless. Hopefully, with no problem. Good luck. Next up from Ben Kutscher. First off, great channel, great team and again, you’re doing a great job. Thank you very much, Ben. Thank you to everyone for following us, watching the videos, and actually commenting on them. It’s great to have that feedback from you. So your question is, I’ve
been watching your SRAM bleeding clip. I got myself an Avid Kit
for my SRAM Guide RS Brakes. It’s on a Canyon Spectral 2017 Model but I noticed the fitting of the syringe is threaded
and different from the syringe fitting that
you’re using in your clip. Does it also work with the
threaded syringe for the SRAM Models after 2015? Would like to avoid opening
the packaging in terms of a possible exchange. I’ll send you a pic for
your bike vault soon. Yes, please do. Okay, so this is the
fitting you have from your description and this is the
fitting that I use in the video. So they’re both for SRAM brakes. This is for the older
style and this is the one that’s got the bleeding
edge port on there. Now the way you can identify
which ones you need to use, is if you look at the screen right now. The one on the left hand side
of the screen is the brake that you need for threaded
style, adapter you already have and the one on your right is
the one for the Bleeding Edge. That should help you identify which one of these you do need. Now not all SRAM brakes have that port. I’ve had some newer
bikes in my collection, that still have the older style port and some of the older ones
have the newest style ports. There are certain serial numbers
of brakes that have changed over the years but all brakes from now, moving forward will have
that bleeding edge port. Now you can also just buy
the bleeding edge adapter and use that on your existing syringe kit. So you can have that and that way you’ve got everything
covered for all occasions. So that is worth considering, especially if you’ve gone
throught the hassle of having a bleeding kit in the first place, it’s kind of good to
have more stuff than less because you can hope your
main bleeds their brakes, that sort of stuff. So there’s a link on the screen as well, to where you can get a Bleeding Edge tool. Obviously, those two photos
will hopefully help you identify which ones that you need. Next up is a good question. I really like this one. This is from Alexander Ashman. I just noticed a tear in
the sidewall of my tire. I wonder if it’s a problem? I have no idea how it happened. Should I do something about it? Or is it fine? Let’s look at his picture. So the tires, especially ground control. Yeah, that’s a pretty
big tire slash on there. It doesn’t look like its
gone all the way through but on the actual sidewall, I can actually start to see
some of the threading in there. Ideally, you should replace it. However, I made a video on
repairing a tire sidewall slash just like this one. If you look on the screen in a moment, you can see how I’m doing the repair. I’ll just run you through it. So what you need to do is take the tire off your bike completely. Get yourself a decent needle and thread. I used linen thread ’cause
it’s really quite tough stuff, it’s got a thick thread. You need a leather needle to get through that tire sidewall. You can simply stitch that up. Once you’ve stitched it, you’re going to need some vulcanizing rubber glue on the outside of the tire. The one I used in the
video is called Shoe Goo. It’s basically designed for
skateboarding shoes to put on your leading edge foot
so when you’re doing ollies and stuff, you’re not gonna really
wear out your trainers. As a result, this stuff
is really flexible so it works perfectly on outside of the tire. Then on the inside of the tire, you’re gonna need to repair that as well just to make sure
there’s no chance of that split going through. Now I use an all-terrain
vehicle tire patch. There’s various different
ones in the market. You can get them on Amazon, and any sort of online place. Repair that with your
typical vulcanizing solution and then you’re good to go. Make sure that you monitor it though and make sure you don’t
start running really higher pressures on it
because the thread won’t hold. But it does mean you’ll be able to get more use out of the tire before you have to throw
it away for recycling. So there we go, this is
another Ask GMBN Tech weekly clinic in the bag. If you’ve got any comments about any questions on this week’s show, just add them in those comments below. The e-mail address is on the screen. If you send in any questions for us, please don’t forget to use
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we and find them easily and answer them all. For a couple of great videos,
click down here for all the weird and wonderful stuff
we saw out in Sea Otter. And for the second Sea Otter tech video, click down here. As always, click on
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