Is Professional Cycling More Dangerous Than Ever? | GCN Show Ep.368

Is Professional Cycling More Dangerous Than Ever? | GCN Show Ep.368


– From stage two of TDU,
welcome to the GCN Show. – Welcome to the GCN show. – Coming up this week, is pro cycling more dangerous then ever. We don’t actually know. So we’ve asked Bernie Eisel. – We have. We’ve always got the latest
lane cycling controversy. And yes, it involves gravel. We’ve got another reason why
Peter Sagan is a cycling great. And we’ve got cycling terrorists. (intense rock music) This week in the world of cycling we learned that racing full gas with an energy gel in one hand is potentially a recipe for disaster. Here is the latest in our very successful near miss of the day segment. – Whoa, that is a near miss, isn’t it? Well held Caleb Ewan. And now we also learned this week, courtesy of World Tour Pro Ben King, just what the new world
gravel champion jersey will look like. (trumpeting) Trendy. – I can see you in that Si. More coming up from the latest storm in cyclings tea cup later on in the show. We also learned this week,
finally, and rather sheepishly, that we had been fooled last week by a Dia De Los Inocentes. Which is not hard, because we hadn’t found out
about Dia De Los Inocentes ’till about five minutes ago. But thank you to Rod in the
comments for pointing it out. – Yeah, so it turns out
that Columbian pro cyclist, Carlos Quintero, doesn’t actually have a
son that he’d never met racing for a Chinese continental team that was the product of a night of passion from a training camp 19 years previously. – We should’ve gone with
our instincts on that one, really, shouldn’t we Si.
– We should. – ‘Cause nothing like that every happens on a cyclist training camp. – Nope, did try and
tell you last week Dan. – Finally this week we learned
through Scott Wolfington that contrary to popular
belief triathlon can be fun. (whirring) (splashing) – Clearly, not a real
triathlete though Dan. He was wearing socks and he can bunny hop. – True. At least he had a soft
landing though, didn’t he. – Yeah.
– The same couldn’t be said for a number of cyclists in
the Pro Peloton last week as cycling appears to be just as dangerous as it has ever been when
you’re racing at a top level. We saw multiple crashes
at the Tour Down Under. And a huge pile up caused
by a spectator on day one of the Vuelta a San Juan. – Yeah, as dangerous as
it’s ever been, Dan you say. Or, worse. – And who better to talk
about this very subject, then Bernie Eisel, who’s
fresh out of the Pro Peloton, and who’s career spanned 19 seasons. So he’s probably a seen a
change or two over that time. Now this was something
I thought about Bernie, on the second stage of
the Tour Down Under. There were two big crashes. Viviani lost a lot of skin. Simon Yates had a
massive gash in his knee. Rafael Valls of Bahrain-McLaren
had a fractured scapula, I think. And we had Ben Hermans as well, who fractured multiple
parts of his shoulder. And I was just there
watching it and thinking, “This has has always
been a dangerous sport. “But it looks to me like
it’s getting more dangerous.” Would that be your view? – It, kind of that’s, I mean, if you, you have to look at it in general. Is, like, the sport
itself got more dangerous because road furniture,
everything to make the road safer, and more quiet for the normal road user, is what makes it more dangerous for us. And this is for the racing,
and traffic islands, and polika here, a polika there, and you’d never know, a
flower pot in some cities. But at the same time it is so many things that come together. I think if we discussed it many times. You know, there were
complaints that the youngsters, too many young riders coming
in, of course it plays a role. We can’t blame them, it’s like- – I mean, that’s like the
traditional thing, isn’t it? That everybody says, “These youngsters come
in and have no respect.” That must’ve been the same 19 years ago when you started your career, that the leaders were saying, “These youngsters have no respect.” Is that actually the case? Do you think it is getting worse? – It, I think it’s getting better again. We definitely had years
when it was definitely rough in the Peloton. When it was absolutely
no respect for each one. And even from the guys from, let’s say from the top down,
and also from the bottom up. It’s like everybody was just out there and fighting each other. And this got much better. There’s a lot more respect. The Peloton also got safe and in a way, because we have less
riders in the Peloton. – But I was also thinking about the fact that everybody is more aero now. So they’ve got their helmet,
they’ve got the skin suit, they’ve got the aero bikes and
the aero wheels, et cetera. Everybody also seems more
committed to training almost year round. Like there’s no opportunity
to let yourself go at all. Or to even have a drink. We’ve seen quite a few team
have a no alcohol policy. So all of those factors combined, I felt, might be making the Peloton
faster then it’s ever been. And as you said, there’s more pressure. And it was only, probably,
when team Sky started, that you saw a team for the entire day trying to stay together. Before that you could kind of mingle about and just find each other towards the end. So there must’ve been changes
that have been a factor in the speed of the races, et cetera. – Definitely, I mean, we have seen the speed
is going up every year. And of course new materials. And like you said, aerodynamics. And of course also the
movement of the Peloton. There’s no preparation races anymore. From the first race of the
season till the last one, the pressure is on, and
you have to deliver. And this you can see, they are
all 100% professionals now. And probably way back in day, we had some races, we had a good laugh, and just, you know, didn’t really think
about the racing itself. And just were out there
to have a good time. And this changed completely. And the guys are still having a good time, but it’s all about the
racing and performance. And it’s a good point, might
back HTC, or something. Or even other trains. When they got it perfectly,
they were untouchable. Like, I was involved in it, as bike, because we had a lead up train, and nobody could even
come close to some point. ‘Till all the other teams
got more professional and diversified in sprinting and, oh, having a team around the leaders. – Well I think back in the HTC days, when you were in the lead out train there, the other teams, once you
got to the front, would say, “Right, this is the lead
out for Mark Cavendish, “And we’ll do our best
to get on the wheel.” But as you said, now every
rider that’s a good sprinter wants a lead out train. So in the overhead shots
sometimes on the lead into finish you’ve got four of five
trains next to each other. And on those overhead shots, there’s barely an inch of road to spare. Like, it just seems so
condensed, and so fast, that if, you know, it’s a chain reaction, if one person comes down,
you’ve got no chance. – Of course, and you see that in the
Peloton it’s a bit easier. When you’re on the bike you
see those moves happening and you can react a little bit before. And it’s pretty much that moving your bike without touching your brakes. And that’s what these guys do
then, the proper sprinters. And, thanks God we don’t
see everything on TV. And, but definitely. And then at the same time, it’s not only just the sprinter
teams moving out there, Sterling was also a stage
where it goes to GC. Because you could lose
time, if there’s a gap. And that’s why also the
GC rider start moving up, and they have a full lead
out just for their leader, not to lose time. And that’s what we not only
see anymore in the tour, we also see it other
races when it comes down. Don’t lose time in GC in a stupid crash. – So in conclusion, would you
say that professional cycling is any more dangerous out on the road now then it was 19 years ago when you started? – Yes, definitely it
is way more dangerous. And, because of the road furniture. But, I wouldn’t blame the
riders, or smaller teams, or something, you know,
all the young riders. I wouldn’t blame them. It’s, they were always
part of the, you know? But we’re all in the same boat. And that’s the mix, it’s
the momentum of the Peloton. But I think with there road
furniture and the pressure it definitely was a big,
big change in the sport. And what made it
definitely more dangerous. – Yeah, it’s a dangerous
sport, always has been. Sounds like it always will be. But thanks for your time Bernie. – Thank you mate.
– Much appreciated. – You know, really I never realized is quite
how good looking Bernie is. Until there, ’till he was
sat there next to you. – Hmm, the be honest I hadn’t
realized how ugly I am, until I sat next to Bernie. (laughs) – Well that’s ’cause you’re
normally sat next to me, isn’t it?
– Yeah. – Right, anyway, seriously though, some very good points there. As you said mate, it’s always going to be a dangerous sport when you got 200 riders
inches away from each other at speeds in excess of 60 k an hour. But really interesting
hearing from Bernie, that he thinks it’s the
traffic calming measures that are actually the biggest culprit. – It was very interesting
to hear from him. But, crashes like we saw
in San Juan on the Sunday involving a spectator. Or crashes like we’ve seen
recently which involve barriers down the finishing straight with feet on, just shouldn’t be happening any more. And the powers that be within cycling should be stopping them
from happening all together. – Absolutely. Right, now speaking of
accidents waiting to happen, should we check back in with Ollie? Who is now just a few weeks away from his hour record attempt. And actually his latest vlog
was from his 3D body scanning. The mind boggles. (synteresis music) – Hi guys. So one of the unique
things about the Sufferfest is it actually contains a mental
training component as well, in addition to all the
hard physical work outs. And this is important because
the psychology of sport is massive when it comes
to performing optimally. Now using the best equipment possible might only be worth a few
percent in many cases, in real terms. But psychologically, knowing that you’re using
the best equipment possible can be worth much more,
10, 15, 20% in your head. And with that in mind,
I’ve come to visit Nopinz. Now, Nopinz are going to
make me a custom cutting edge tailor-made skin suit. And that involves getting
my body 3D scanned. So let’s do it. (mellow electronic music) So here in this bag is my
finished custom made skin suit. Now I’m going to go to the wind
tunnel and see how quick it is. But if you want to see what it looks like, well, you’re going to have to stay tuned. ‘Cause there’s going to be a
full video coming out about that. So, see you next time. (intense drum beating) – It is now time for your
weekly GCN inspiration. Where you upload your inspirational
cycling photos or videos to the GCN app and we pick out
our favorite three each week for a very cool prize. So without further ado,
in third place this week, we have this from notlobdivad. This is the start of a 12 km
cobbled climb out of Rumia through the forest of Devnyck. I’ve been meaning to try it for a while, so this weekend we made the
best of the mild Polish winter and gave it a go. 12 km cobbled climb Si. – [Simon] That sounds bonkers! That must be a typo, surely. 1.2 kilometers? I don’t know.
– [Dan] Let us know. If you live near by,
you’ve heard of it before, or even ridden it, make sure you let us
know what it’s all about. – Absolutely. Anyway, either way, fantastic
photo, super cool location. You win a GCN casquette. There we go. It matches our jumpers, doesn’t it. (laughs) Right, okay, in second place, and winning a GCN racing jersey, very cool one if I do say so myself. Is this one sent in by roysieboysie. Daily spin over the Aberdeen
bypass during an epic sunset. Now this is cool, now isn’t it? ‘Cause this is one of
those ones where it’s like, you know, it’s a bridge over a bypass, like it’s not a particularly
attractive location. But, doesn’t it just make you
want to go out on you’re bike? – I lived inside the M25,
the ring road around London, for a few years, and there was nothing I found more, or left me feeling more smug, than riding my bike over the M25. People stuck in traffic
each and every day. – I know what you mean actually. It’s that feeling of escape isn’t it. It is inspiring. – Well done roysieboysie. That jersey will be on
it’s way to you soon. But the winner this week of the big prize, which is the fan jersey here. As well as the base layer, forward slash nightclubbing attire. – [Simon] Forward slash is, I like that. – [Dan] smilercx, never fails to inspire, with views of Worms Head and Rhossili Bay on the Gower Swansea. That is in South Wales.
– [Simon] Wow! That’s close to home that one isn’t it. – [Dan] It’s not far away. – [Simon] Not far at all. – [Dan] Maybe head over there Si, and get some inspirational
photos of yourself. – [Simon] Yeah. That’s amazing, isn’t it? I’m going to go there this weekend. – Well done to all three of you. And don’t forget to get involved, ready for next weeks GCN show, by uploading your best
cycling photos and videos to the GCN app. (trumpeting) (warbling) – It’s now time for cycling shorts. – Cycling shorts now. I’m going to start with news
from the Tour Down Under. Where Richie Porte has taken
his second win at that race. He did miss out on his
customary stage victory on top of Willunga Hill. But he was five seconds faster then he’s previous personal best up there. So he’ll undoubtedly be
delighted with that one. – That according to Matty
P. O’Reilly on Twitter. Bit early to say whether that means he’s on for his best season ever, Richard Porte.
– Yes. – But always good to get off
on the right foot, isn’t it? Now last week we already
mentioned the fundraising efforts of Lachlan Morton of EF Education First. And he’s still at it,
along with teammate there, Mitch Docker. Two riders who are known, really, for they’re illustrious flowing locks, and also humongous mustaches. Have shaved a lot off for charity. – Yeah, they have. And they raised 8,800 dollars
for the Salvation Army Bushfire Relief Fund. Brilliant. I can’t help wonder, though, if they’d have got even more money if they’d stopped half way through. But, anyway. – We shall move on now to
gravel racing’s coming of age foreword slash premature death. This at the hand of the
sports governing body. – ♪ Dun dun dun! ♪ Last week it was USA cycling
that are trying to help, help. This week there are reports
that the UCI president is now interested in sanctioning an official world gravel championships. – Much to the horror of gravel
racing stalwart, Ted King. Who simply tweeted, “Just please don’t.” – [Simon] Yeah, or gravel
newb, Peter Stetina, who tweeted, “They can make
a race on gravel roads, “but it won’t be gravel racing.” Which seems ironic coming from a ex professional road cyclist who is starting his first
full season of racing gravel. But we’ll let that one slide. – Also begs the question, how
do you organize a gravel race? Really, doesn’t it? Interestingly, the Velo News
article on this very subject pointed out that this could be very good for the gravel racing
scene over here in Europe. And that is because it’s
very hard to get insurance for mass participation events over here, without input from a governing body. – Well that is interesting,
actually, I did not know that. Right, now moving on
from a cycling subject that ultimately doesn’t matter a jot, to one that really does. Basketball legend LeBron James and his uninterrupted empowerment group have teamed up with Lyft to offer free bike share for
young people through the YMCA. – [Dan] He says, “Growing up a bike
changed everything for me. “It was more than a way to see my friends “or play basketball, it was a way of life. “A bike opened doors, “allowed me to get to
safe places after school, “and gave me access to opportunities “I never would have known.” – That is really cool,
isn’t it, really cool. All right, now staying with the US, of course there’s a lot at stake
with the election coming up in November of this year. Including though, Dan, a one billion dollar pothole relief fund. ♪ Dun dun dun. ♪ – Yeah, I’d reckon that
although this is a lot of money, it probably wouldn’t even
fill half the potholes we got on our small
island of the UK would it? – (laughs) No. That’s why gravels so good, isn’t it? ‘Cause then they’re not potholes any more. It’s just part of the sport. – I find them mega annoying
even on gravel rides. (laughs) – Spoken like a true roadie there. You’ll never understand gravel racing Dan. (laughs) Anyway, this is actually
coming from an article we read on streetsblog. Potential presidential nominee, and current New York City
Mayor, Mike Bloomberg, set out an infrastructure plan that promises to maintain
roads that already exist, rather than building new ones. But within that, he’s also
promised to triple funding for bicycle and pedestrian routes. Which is cool, isn’t it. – Very good news indeed. – Yeah, although, now I’m
not really good at math. But, I’m pretty sure that
three times not very much could still be not very much. So, you know. – A little bit more. – Well, yeah, we kind of got
to wait and see haven’t we. – More news from over in the US and specifically Washington D.C. This from an article that
we read on bicycling.com which shows that residents
and cyclists there can now report bad driving
using a brand new app called OurStreets. The idea being that if you see
something like a close pass or maybe somebody parked in a bike lane, you report it using that app. – Yeah, and although early days, it has been successful enough to allow law enforcement officials to actually prosecute repeat offenders. Plus, think of all the
data that it’s creating. That will actually map
out accident black spots and parts of a city that
cyclists have trouble with. So, hopefully, allowing planners to actually improve the
infrastructure there. – And the app team have
got plans to extend it out to other areas soon, apparently. Meanwhile, over here in the UK, the Independent Newspaper
reported last week that the world wide cycling
movement, Critical Mass, have been added to the
counter-terrorism watch list. – Yes, although, according to police Dan, this is just to add context to the list. So there we go. Right, now we’re going
to finish cycling shorts with a very cool story
featuring Peter Sagan. Already an inspiration to many people. But it’s his actions behind the scenes that I think really mark him
out as truly one of the greats. And this story kind of sums it up. So Dr. Jonathon Leung
tweeted a picture of his son, young son, out riding. Which is very cool in itself. And he tagged Peter Sagan into it. – [Dan] Yes, Sagan then sent
him a direct message on Twitter asking if that was his son. And when he replied saying yes, he then sent him out a signed
autobiography and jersey! How cool is that? – [Simon] That is super cool, isn’t it? Fair play, Peter Sagan. – Have you read his autobiography. – I haven’t actually, not yet. – I wonder if it’s available on audiobook? – Narrated by who? Peter? (electronic music) – We have got a brand
new give away for you, with some very cool prizes, which Si will be going
through very shortly. Firstly, let me tell you the premise. As you all know, Ollie is shortly going
to be attempting to break Eddie Merckx hour record using every aero aide,
and other tech aide, that he possibly can. So in order to give him
a chance of winning, what you need to do, is guess exactly how far Ollie
is going to ride in one hour. And you need to do that in
kilometers to 3 decimal places. Closest person’s going to win. – [Simon] That is a tough one, isn’t it? – [Dan] It is. – [Simon] I haven’t got a clue. Is he going to break Eddie
Merckx’s hour record? That’s the goal, so that’s what you should
perhaps basing yourselves on. Whether it’s above or bellow that, we’ll just leave that up to you. – Better bellow.
– Anyway, the prizes, this is amazing, so Ollie’s been doing it all with the help of the Sufferfest. So they are offering a
year’s free subscription to the Sufferfest. Plus a customized training plan. Plus, it doesn’t stop there, a Wahoo KICKR CORE
trainer to do it all on. And a Wahoo ticker heart rate monitor so you can totally monitor your training. Plus a Wahoo mat as well,
for people like myself. – Sounds like it’s something
that you should probably enter. Given that all you got to
do is type in five numbers. All the details on how
to do that are on a link which you can find in the description just bellow this video. – That’s right. We also, Dan, have some
results for you, as well. From a giveaway from a couple
of weeks ago with Gravel Epic. So this is there new Moroccan race. Which sounds amazing. We will be out there, we being GCN. And it was four a winner
plus a guest, wasn’t it? So you could take friend, loved one, someone that asks really
nicely, via social media, along with you for an
amazing trip out to Morocco. – I think we should have a drum roll. (fast tapping) Yeah, we do our own, in case they haven’t got
an audio clip to put in. The winner is, Thierry Mondor,
from France, obviously. – Congratulations Thierry. That’s cool isn’t it? – Yeah, brilliant prize. (drill whirring) It is now time for hack foreword
slash bodge of the week. You’ve been over on the GCN
app voting on hacks and bodges that we put up over last weeks GCN show. So we should go through them now. But we’re not going to
reveal it to ourselves, until we have determined whether
they’re a hack or a bodge. – I’m quite nervous about this Dan. – I am a little about as well. We’re going to see if
you’re in agreement with us, or vice versa. And the first one this
week came in from postrom, or postrom. Chimes for the little one. Let’s have a little listen. (high pitched ringing) – [Simon] Oh those are nice chimes. – [Dan] They are aren’t they.
– [Simon] I like that. I mean, not aesthetically
pleasing for a child, I wouldn’t have thought. Unless they’re really into
bikes at a very young age. – Bit like a present for the dad really. – It is yeah. Or the mom, of course Dan. But I think that’s a bodge, personally. It doesn’t really feel
like it’s, you know, kind of, nursery sort of furniture. – Well, before we reveal
the public’s opinion, shall I say hack, so at least one of us is in
agreement with the viewers? – I like it. Always thinking, Dan.
– all right, hack. I like the sound.
– Bodge, I think it’s not very child friendly. – Right, well the results are
that 64% said it was a hack. – [Simon] What? – [Dan] I’m with you guys. Although, prolearly said, “Man,
I hope those are tied well.” that’s a good point, isn’t it? – [Simon] That is a very good point. – Well, no I think we can presume that they are not hanging
directly over the baby’s cot. (laughs) – Well, I hope so. Because that really does, that’s like a sword of Damocles
kind of moment isn’t it? Right, anyway, me and proleary
are in agreement there. Right, next up, this
one from cody_chouinard. Spotted at Bikerowave in Mar, I see what they’ve done
there, Bikerowave, nice. Anyway in Mar Vista, California. This looks like, well, – [Dan] Like the original Bahrain’s. – [Simon] Yeah, or is that some kind of like
road clearing mechanism? You could get people to move
out of the way pretty sharpish on the bike path, Dan, I reckon. – [Dan] Look how many positions you’ve now got available to you. You could get properly aero using those. – Although, what is going
on with that saddle? That does not look comfortable. That looks like an
accident waiting to happen, if you ask me. (laughs) – I’m stuck on the saddle. (laughs) – [Simon] Oh dear. – [Dan] Well, I’m saying
hack for the bars. – [Simon] I think hack for the bars. I mean, I can’t see a down side. They just look amazing. And also I think antlers
are quite light weight, aren’t they, really? – [Dan] Yeah. Right are you ready? – [Simon] Yup. – [Dan] 77% said it was a bodge. – [Simon] No. – [Dan] Well, you’re all wrong. – [Simon] Yeah, what’s going on there? Right then, next up. – Moving on, we had this
from trotskigaucho123. I’m not sure what’s going on here. It’s basically like a bike combined with some sort of Vespa moped. – [Simon] Yeah, I mean, I can’t really see advantages of that. – [Dan] Love the cool retro
telephones underneath. Anyway, back to bike. I’m saying bodge. – [Simon] Yeah, I’m saying bodge though. (boing) – [Dan] No, just get a
Vespa, or get a town bike. Okay, 62% of you said bodge as well. So we are in agreement on that one. – Yeah, there we go. Right then, next up we
got this one from dsta. I think, are we going to
say it’s an acronym, dsta? Anyway, he’s wrapped elastic bandage around the top of his handle bars to avoid sweaty bar syndrome when
doing indoor training. And he said it works well
and is cheap to replace. I think, Dan, that’s absolutely rank. (laughs) Like what’s, you know,
if you got some like, some shiny bar tape, it’s never
going to like soak up sweat. It just kind of drips off and
then you can wipe it clean. Whereas that, oh my goodness
me, manky bandage syndrome. – [Dan] Well he does say
it’s easy to replace it. Imagine if he doesn’t
do it for a few weeks. (grimacing) The smell as you walk into the bike room when you need to do your training. Well I’m definitely saying that’s a bodge. – Absolutely, that’s disgraceful bodged. Just take it off, quick. – Right, well app users
have said 64% say bodge. What’s going on with the 36% of you that said that was a hack? – [Simon] I don’t know. Oh my word. Just have like bare metal. I mean, it’s an indoor trainer. It’s not like you got any road buzz. – No. (shuddering) Right, the fifth and
final one fro this week comes in from harryboyle. A vintage seat post clamp makes for a perfect guide to
cut our carbon steerer tube. Results! – [Simon] Hey, nice. That is cool.
– [Dan] Very neat, isn’t it? – [Simon] Yeah, that’s a hack for me, Dan. – [Dan] That’s a hack for me as well. And from the general public it is a hack. 72% of you that voted on
that said it was a hack. – [Simon] You know, guys, I invented something similar
to that, actually, at home. I didn’t have a vintage clamp, but I did have two random
old stems knocking around. I’ve got like zillion stems. I don’t know why. Anyway, still got two of them. Sandwich them together, ♪ ta da! Cutting guide. – Wow.
– I was happy with that. – Yeah I’m not surprised. I like that, that was
actually pretty good. – Thanks, yeah. – Right, next weeks hacks
foreword slash bodges are already up over on the
GCN app for you to vote on. So make sure you head over
there to cast your opinion and see whether or not you’re
in agreement with myself and Si next week. (electronic music) – Right then, it is time
for caption competition. That point in the show where
you get a chance to win a coveted GCN elite water bottle. All you got to do is write
an incredibly witty caption to a photo we’re about to give you. – Yes, that photo last week
being this one of Richie Porte, Rohan Dennis, and Matt Pedersen, at the pre Tour Down
Under Press conference. And our winner this week is, Ryon Beachner. Richie Porte is looking
downright presidential. (laughs) Very good Ryon. Get in touch on Facebook with your address and we’ll get that sent out to you. It was a good job that Porte ended up in the orange jersey at the
end of the race, wasn’t it? ‘Cause actually,
– Made his face look normal. – It settled him right
down, didn’t it, yeah. – Well maybe we should’ve
got you an orange t-shirt before Christmas ends, shall we? This weeks photo is this
one of Giacomo Nizzolo pre stage five at the Tour Down Under, struggling a little bit to
get his heart rate strap on. Si is going to get you started. – [Simon] Yeah. (throat clearing) “Guys, I tell you, I’m
feeling really nippy today.” – [Dan] That was, was that Italian? – [Simon] “Guys I tell you, I’m
feeling really nippy today.” – Slightly better Si, but
the actual joke is terrible. – Oh, come on.
– You can definitely do better than that, both with your own accents, but also with the actual caption. Which you need to leave
in the comments section just down bellow. We’ll pick our favorite
this time next week. – You seriously that surprised? – I don’t know what the first accent was. (electronic music) Before we let you know what’s coming up on GCN over the next week we are going to go through a
few of our favorite comments from the last weeks videos. I say last weeks video’s. Most of them center around
Ollie’s, don’t they. This is where he visited
82 hours team training camp and spent a day basically
riding like a pro, well not riding like a pro rider, – Riding with the pros. – Do the same things as
a pro rider, kind of. Anyway, this came in from Tommy Shelby. Poor Ollie left to eat all on his own. Takes me back to my school days. We should get a violin out
for Tommy, shouldn’t we? – [Simon] Well that’s right. Oxymoron then said that
training ride, 160 k, 4,000 meters of climbing, sounds like a near death experience to me! Hashtag pray for Ollie. – [Dan] Well that’s a hashtag we could continue to use isn’t it? – [Simon] I think there’s
a lot of mileage in that, isn’t there? Given his hour record comin’ up. Supposedly the worst thing
you can do on a bicycle. – Can we get it around the Velo Drone? Like the sponsor they
normally have on the board. Just hashtag pray for Ollie for him to read every time he does a lap. – I think we should, that’s genius. – Right, this came in from deoo, what a funny guy! I hope he finally wins
a classic this season. I’m not sure he’s ever even
done a classic, has he? – [Simon] A bridgewood?
– [Dan] Yeah. – [Simon] No. I don’t think he’s racing
a classic this year either. – [Dan] If he did, as well as getting out
Eddie Merckx hour record, wouldn’t it? And finally Mariah Barr, the host is so cute I’m sure lot’s of women
would give him a message. – [Simon] Massage. – [Dan] Oh yes, a massage. – [Simon] Did that really
come from under the video with Ollie in? – Apparently so. Ollie was in on the script earlier, so maybe he put that one in. Maybe that’s a pseudonym. – Yes, I was going to say,
yeah the, yeah anyway. Was taken by surprise, that one. But, you know, good, really good. – Hashtag pray for Ollie. – Yeah, unfortunately, the video with me that
went out the previous day, there were no comment remotely like that. ‘Cause I had to get my top off. (whistling) Although Jim Soto did say, is it just me, or does Nigel seem like one of the nicest most cordial people on the planet? (laughs) He is. – [Dan] Of the two people in the video, Jim chose to write that
about Nigel, big surprise. – He was very tactful, which was good. So, yeah, no, Nigel’s a top chap. I like him very much. – Meanwhile, Trevor Holmes
said please oh please, shave that tuff that’s on your chest. Initially I thought it was the mic fluff. But no, he’s right. It’s just a bit of- – It’s taken 36 years go get
this, it’s not going anywhere. – Imagine where it’ll
be when you’re 72 mate. (laughs) – Probably, did it increase, or decrease? – I don’t know, well it gets grayer. – Yeah. – Anyway, well let’s tell everyone what’s coming up on the
channel over the next week. Starting on Wednesday, where we are going to teach
you how to ride in strong wind. Which is a key skill for some of us. Because they can be dangerous. – Absolutely, especially
this time of year. – On Thursday we’ve got an ask
the pro’s with Mr. Cannings, haven’t we? – That’s right. – And he asks pro cyclist down under what they’re favorite food is. Then on Friday, we’re going to look at some
other methods of training for the bike but not on the bike. Tim Johnson is with Jeremy Powers looking at cross country skiing. And I can tell you from
personal experience that is a very good
method of cross training. – Is it? – Cross country, yes,
it’s good for your arms. – You feel like your
performance come on a notch since you cross country
skiing the other day. Did you actually ski enough
to get any training benefit? – My arms were feeling
the burn that evening. – Yeah. – I could barely lift my pants. – I was just thinkin’ that, no, anyway. All right, coming up then on Saturday, Chris had a really cool trip
over to see the people at MIPS. So the internal helmet protection stuff. So that video is coming up on Saturday. Then on Sunday, Ollie, well as Dan said, he needs
all the help he can get. Manon, unfortunately, is
a world class track rider. And so she basically teaches him how to get the most out
of himself on the boards. So, yeah. – It looks easy when
Manon does it, doesn’t it? – It does.
– And then Ollie shows us that its not that easy. Monday, of course, it’s
the GCN racing news show over on the GCN racing channel. Which is a good chance to remind you that we do have live coverage
of the Vuelta San Juan every night that it’s on. Because there’s a rest day on Thursday. But, unfortunately,
everywhere in the world, except for Latin America, and Europe. But if you are in Europe, you can catch it live on Eurosport. (rock music) – We’re getting towards
the end of the show now. But as ever, we still have
time for extreme corner. And this week, this video had
been sent in by Andreas IHM over on the app. And quite frankly Dan, this
leaves me absolutely terrified. Check it out. (rock music) – [Dan] Frankly terrifying. – [Simon] Oh isn’t it just. – [Dan] And also, why? – [Simon] Well yeah. I mean we’ve featured
some pretty extreme stuff on extreme corner over the years. But of all of them, that
one for some reason, I think it’s probably
the exposed steerer tube, and no way of correcting it. I mean, just, just the thought. – Yeah. – Of, you know, like
landing on your sternum. – We can’t ride just no handed
on a pair of rollers can we? – No. I bet, thinking of Manon’s track craft. I bet she’s nifty on a pair of rollers. – I bet she is, yeah. We should probably redo that housing video,
actually, shouldn’t we? – And actually do it properly you mean? Yeah, cracker idea. – Right, that really is the
end of this weeks GCN show. Hope you’ve enjoyed it. If you have, please click
on the thumbs up icon, which you can find bellow the video. – Yup, and if you would like to watch another video right now, if you haven’t seen it
yet, you really must. So click through now, Ollie heads over to
basically spend the day with Oliver Mason at the
82 hour training camp.