Is It Cheaper To Build Your Own Mountain Bike? | Ask GMBN Tech

Is It Cheaper To Build Your Own Mountain Bike? | Ask GMBN Tech


(dramatic music) – Welcome to Ask GMBN Tech. This is our 30th show so this is great. It’s a weekly show where you guys get to send in your questions about technical related
mountain bike stuff. And hopefully, we can
give you a decent answer so you learn some understanding of bikes. To get your entries in, send ’em to they email address that’s on the bottom of the screen there or you can add ’em in the comments below. Please use the #askGMBNtech so you can make it real easy
to identify your questions. So jumping straight in with Elias Sandell is what
is the down side of using a seven, eight, nine,
10 speed chain breaker an an 11 speed chain? I’ve got one in a took kit and I don’t know if
I’m supposed to use it. Essentially, with chain tools Elias they’re fairly similar things, but chains, of course, are very different. A 12 speed chain is a lot
narrower than a seven speed chain. Basically, it’s gonna do a lot more. It’s gonna have flex built into it. It’s gonna fit in between
all of those smaller gearings and there’s a lot more for it to do than an older seven speed chain. Now, while she can break almost any chain with any chain tool, putting it back together again, or you’re rejoining ’em, driving a pin through can be a bit more difficult when you’re using the incorrect compatibility on a chain tool because if the jaws
don’t line up properly, it’s not gonna allow you to
drive the pin back through. Now if I pick up this
park one, for example, I’ll show you what I mean by that. If I just undo this, now you’ll see on here
the jaws on this one are actually movable and that is because it’s compatible with virtually all size chains. I mean, I think there’s two or three that it’s not compatible with. I think they’re probably campagnolo stuff because they’re a bit bizarre. It’s an Italian company that makes stuff that’s a bit different. But this is compatible
with 12 speed chains backwards all the way
down so because of that, that’s essentially the thing
that makes the difference. Now, it does depend on
the particular chain tool that you do have. Now, those made by major manufacturers like Shimano, Park,
Topeak, stuff like that, generally tends to be pretty accurate but there’s a hell of a lot of ’em on the market by other people. They’re a bit vague and what
sells ’em is an eight speed but you might find it works really well on 10 and 11 speed. And it’s something you won’t know until you actually try it and see if it lines up yourself. Essentially, if it lines up
and it works, happy days! You can use it to split
and re-join the chain. These days, bear in mind, it’s a lot easier and potentially safer, to use adjoining master links. Now, these are able to fit
most size chains on the market and it’s as simple as splitting a chain until you’ve got two same
joints basically on there. Put the master link in
and pull it into place. It’s a really simple tool
free system, basically, of joining a chain. And it’s also very safe
because let’s just say on the chain, you’ve got an outer place and you’ve got an inner place and you’ve got rollers on the middle. Now if you’re using the chain tool on the chain to re-join the chain is you lay the chain into the jaws here and you drive the pin
all the way back through. But the pin has to sit all the way into that second outer plate and if it’s not quite in there, that will be a weak link of the chain. And it’s a matter of time
before under tension, that pops out and basically,
your chain will snap. If the chain snaps when you’re peddling, you could be lucky. You could just be sat down. It snaps and nothing really happens rather than the inconvenience. If your chain snaps when
you’re peddling on the load, like out the saddle
sprinting, for example, you’re gonna go over the handlebars and it’ll always happen at the one time you would never, ever expect it and it would be a really bad crash. Just take care. Make sure your chain tool does line up and then you’re good to go. Next up is brake cleaning
related from Raymond Paculan. Hey Doddy, nice videos. Thank you, Raymond. I want to ask if I can use contact cleaner in cleaning disc brake pads and rotors. I want to know what
shop towel you’re using in your maintenance videos as well. Hopefully, you will answer this question. Yeah, of course. So basically, we’ve got
some brake cleaner here and some contact cleaner here. They’re very similar things and they both isopropyl alcohol in them. Now, contact cleaner is
probably the least offensive of those things. It’s probably not going to
clean your brake pads as well as a dedicated brake cleaner which has more solvent in it. But obviously, the benefit
of a contact cleaner is you can get it anywhere. Loads of brands make contact cleaner and it’s obviously safe for
you to use on electrical stuff like your ignition of your car, if you got water in there, perhaps, or any sort of number of places. And it’s obviously safe for
you to use on circuitry. Now brake cleaner, although it has got isopropyl alcohol in it, it is a bit more aggressive and although I’m sure
there are some out there that are compatible with electrical stuff, I don’t think this particular one is and I think a lot of ’em
will be a bit too aggressive to use on some delicate plastics like on a circuit board, for example. In answer to your question, yes. You can use contact cleaner. Brake cleaner will be better but essentially, the isopropyl alcohol is what’s in ’em that will do the job. Also, make sure that you use
some rubber gloves for the job. You want to have some sort
of nitrol style gloves because you don’t want that
stuff getting on your hands for too long ’cause
it’s quite nasty stuff. And also, you don’t want
the oils in your skin to sort of just transferring
over to those brake pads ’cause that can contaminate ’em. As for the shop towel, here’s some of it here. There’s loads of different
ones on the market. They’re all quite industrial items. This particular one is made
by a band called Scotts. You’ll see this in garages and any sort of traditional workshops. You can buy it at trade places. You can buy it on Amazon in bulk, which is what we do. But there’s loads of
different brands out there. Now the reason we like this one over some of the massive
rolls that you get ’cause those bigger rolls tend
to be slightly softer paper. It don’t go as far even
though you get more but these ones, I think the Scotts stuff, they’re really quite tough. I particularly like it. It’s one of my favorites ’cause you can re-use it quite well. So there you go. Scott’s shop towel. All right, next up from Isaac 232. Could you cut a thread
into the bottom bracket on a press fit bottom bracket frame for a threaded bottom
bracket to install into? No, I don’t think you can. So for a threaded bottom bracket, normally the bearings are out bores. They sit outside the shell. Now the whole point of
the press fit system is the bearings are in
exactly the same position. It’s just they’re inside the shell, which is bigger. So you can try threading that shell but nothing’s really going to happen except you’ll have ruined your frame. I’m sure there might be some
sort of bodge way of doing it but I definitely wouldn’t recommend it. I’d stick to the press
fit it’s designed for and just make sure you
install it correctly and you’ll have creek free riding. All right, next up from Eric Camacho. Hi Doddy, as you know, on my last comment of
my bike being stolen. Yeah, I sure do remember
now seeing your name. I’ve been thinking of building
a bike like your bike build. But what would be better? Building one with your own specs or buying a whole bike
and upgrading over time? I wold build one but I
feel it take a little time, be a little time consuming. Love to hear your thoughts. All right, so based on the bike build that I’m doing on the Tech show each week, bear in mind that this is just
for the benefit of the show so you know, it’s been
spread out into bit by bit. If that was my own personal bike, I’d have done that like
in a single sitting. I would be riding the thing. In fact, it would be half wrecked by now. I’m taking my time with this deliberately because there’s a lot to it and there’s something else
coming up with that bike in the next few episodes. But that said, I think personally, it’s one of the most fun things to do is building your own bike. I think every cyclist,
man, bike, or road cyclist, should do it once. They should build a bike from scratch because it’s really, really good fun. You learn everything about your bike when you’re doing it and you also get the benefit of picking every single part that you want. However, you might not know
all of those parts you want. You might just end up writing yourself a really expensive
shopping list of things, in which case, I think maybe in your case it might be better to buy, let’s just say, a direct style brand like Komoso, Canyon, any of those sort of brands. Or you can get a really, really good frame and fork combination with
a basic group set on there. And over time, as you wear
out the transmission on there, you’ll have been saving
up money, hopefully, at the same time. You’ll have saved some
money by buying the bike in that way in the first place. Start a little savings
account on the side there and over time when you’re riding the bike, let’s just say you wear
out your chaining set when you go to a place
where you upgrade ’em, they’re the next ones up. And then, as time goes on, you end up with a bike with a lot better component on there. The only thing to add if
you’re going to do this is obviously, the frame is important because that’s the thing that
you’re intending on keeping so make sure that the frame
is something you really like and really want. Make sure it’s something that
you’re likely to grow with. So if you’re still growing, for example, make sure there’s enough room in there to grow with the bike physically. And also, make sure it’s
got a decent warranty on it. If you’re gonna have it for a long time, you want to make sure that anything can be covered by the manufacturer if an issue arises. The other thing to factor in is some of the components on there. So the transmission doesn’t matter. It’s completely irrelevant. You will wear that out in time and you can upgrade to better stuff. Makes no odds. The wheels, even the heavy wheels, you can save up and buy light wheels. That’s no problem. Tires, you will wear out. We can sack ’em off to get tires that suit your local riding
terrain straightaway. But when it comes to the suspension fork and the shock on there, quite often some of the budget mortals that are fitted on budget bikes to keep their price point down, you can’t do much with
the internals on ’em. SO make sure that when you buy your bike, you get the best possible
fork and shock on there that you can afford and that means you’ll be
able to adjust that fork. You can order things
later like the progression of the spring in there. You can change the
damping cartridge in there if you want to get more
high performance out if it. Just something you can grow with just like you would with the frame. If you concentrate on getting a good fork, good shock, good frame, the rest of it, you can do over time as you learn more as well, actually, what you’re saving up to. So hopefully, you’ve
got something out there and keep us in the loop of what you buy. I’m really interested, actually. Okay, this one sounds like a bit of a shopping list question. So from bugboy 152000, Doddy, can you help me find the right tools to disassemble my raceface affect cranks for a deep clean? I’d like to completely
break down my Santa Cruz before winter storage this year. As far as I know, there’s nothing particular
about those cranks any different than the others. So you’re gonna need an
8 millimeter Allen key to remove the crank from the bike. You will need either,
which I’ve got on hand, are either a tork T25 or a
five millimeter Allen key to remove whether it’s the spider or the actual direct chain
ring from that crank. You’ll need a BB tool, which
is one of these type things, to take the bottom
bracket out of the bike. You are gonna need, potentially, a mallet just to shock those cranks or the axle. Softer ending or a rubber
ending is a good idea so you don’t damage the axle on there. You’re gonna need grease for when you put stuff back together. You’re gonna need thread lock
when you do that as well. You’re gonna need a shop towel and some sort of gloves
to protect your hands. And then you’re gonna need
some powerful de-greaser. And like I would recommend, keep hold of things
like old ice cream tubs or any sort of plastic vessels. In particular, the black
plastics that can’t be recycled so you may as well use ’em anyway for stuff like this. Anything like that is great
for putting the de-grease in and putting those bits in
and giving ’em a good clean. Old toothbrushes are great
for sort of whittling in there and getting all the crap out of stuff. And there you go. That’s it. There’s nothing particularly
fancy that you need. Just those decent tools
and crack on with it. All right, this is quite cool. This is from Mainz Man. You, being me, you using a torque wrench reminded me of something I’ve been meaning to ask for a while. I know it’s recommend to
always store torque wrench at the lowest setting. But does this apply to Park ATD? I assume it does and I tend
to set mine to 4NM after use but I can’t find anything
to confirm it online. I could just ask Parks, of course, But I figure you might know this. Actually, I’ve not seen any
literature that says this. And I do think it might
be different with the ATD, which is one of these little fellas. If you haven’t seen these before, it’s got adjustable
torque settings on here and it’s got bits in the handle. This is the old one. This is the ATD 1. I think there’s a 1.2 now which has a few extra features on there. Magnetic bit holder so
you don’t lose your bits. It’s an alternative to the classic sort of ratcheting handle ones. Now, as far as I know, the ratcheting handle ones, you do need to always reset
these but not to zero. I think it’s at the lowest
torque setting on there and it’s because it’s
got a ratchet on there basically it’s because of
the way it works internally. Now, bear in mind that these
are a little bit different. When you reach your
torque setting on these, they do sort of click but
you can continue to use them. I think that’s why it’s important so you relieve the pressure on
the internal system in there. The ATD’s are a bit different,
just the way they work. You can’t actually over tighten ’em. It’s just like a click stop. You can’t over tighten that whatsoever. I’m fairly sure these are okay but I don’t doubt that leaving
it on 4NM like this one is right now is a good idea. In this particular workshop, I know that these are used all the time. All the torque wrench stuff is
particularly with our friends on GCN and GCM because they’ve
got a lot of carbon fiber, delicate cockpit bits on the bike, so they obviously have to make sure that they don’t over tighten those. On the mountable side of things, I personally use these quite a lot. I don’t know about the other guys. But we use ’em enough but I don’t think it’s a concern for our storage. I think it’s more the long term storage that you could damage a
conventional torque wrench. But I will ask Park and in fact, I do think we have a special guest come to visit us from
Park later this year. So I’ll keep you posted on that ’cause I think we might be doing some cool stuff with Calvin. Okay, this next one’s tie
related from Sie Simy. My new bike’s got a 35
millimeter rim width with plus tires on it. Can I use 2.4 tires or
do I need a smaller rim? You can use 2.4 tires but not all of ’em. So just for example, in the past, I’ve had the Ibis 7.41 rims, which are, I think they’re 40 or
41 millimeter external, 35 internal, so they’re a
really, really wide rim. I’ve used those with 2.3’s,
235’s, 24’s, and 2.5’s. No problem. But not all tires work. Now, a tire with a square profile, generally if you put ’em on a wider rim, they become even squarer. Which for cornering, when
you’re really aggressive, is a good thing. However, it makes ’em
really flat on the top. So A, increases the friction
when you’re just riding, and B, makes for really
horrible transition from the top part of the tread to the side nobles. It’s very much nothing happens and then you’re all cornering which means it can
break loose quite easily despite the facts it’s got a really good shoulder for support. So it does vary on the
tires that you’re using on your particular bike. If you’ve got slightly
rounded tire profile, these can actually be, can handle a lot more like a more aggressive squarer profile tire by using ’em on the wider rim. So I think you kind of
have to try it and see, to be honest, or at least
maybe ask some other riders on your particular tires to see what they’ve done with theirs. But yes, you can. Just not with all tires. Okay, the last one up is a
clutch related one from Cle Mans. Hey guys. Love your show. Guess I have 70% of my mechanical
skills off your channel. Oh, man. That’s really cool. So you actually work
on your bike yourself. That’s what I like to hear. I do have a question concerning
my drive train though. I run a 1 by 11 Shimano XT Drivetrain. I’ve got my gears indexed correctly and the shifting is snappy and on point. No rubbing or scratching
on the chain whatsoever until I engage my clutch. When I’m on top of the trail and engage the derailleurs clutch, the lower 3 to 4 gears are
not working quite as smoothly and the chain is rubbing
against the next cog. Any tips? Honestly, I’ve never heard of a clutch affecting the way a gear shifts other than you can feel
slightly more force through the lever when
you’re actually shifting. Firstly, I find it unusual that
you’re running a clutch off and then just turning on for descent. I would, personally, just
leave it on the whole time. I have advantage of that. I would also assuming that your gears are set up correctly in the first place or you’ve done your high
and low limit screws. You’ve done your B tension,
which is the swing tension on that rear derailer and you’ve got it all adjusted with the correct cable tension on there, try setting it up again
re-indexing your gears but with the clutch on. Try that same thing again
using those smaller gears and take the clutch off. See if it affects it, which I’m pretty sure it won’t. Then you know what the issue is but I find it strange
that it’s even an issue in the first place to be honest and it would suggest to me
because what a clutch does is put more tension on
the lower cage there that something is loose so something could be
loose on the derailer but perhaps a jockey wheel or guide wheel so check those. Even the actual main
hanger bolt might be loose. But I can’t imagine it’s ever gonna really affect your gear so I think you have to do
process of elimination there to try to find it. Let us know though, Cle, because that is an odd one. I’ve not heard that before. Okay, so there’s the end
of another Ask GMBN Tech. Hopefully, I answered
some of your questions. Get yours in the comments below and fire ’em into the email address that was on the screen at the beginning. For a couple more cool videos, click down here for our Press
fit BB maintenance video. That’s not just for Press fit but I hope it eliminates
all of creeks and groans. But I use a Press fit as
an example in that video and click down here for our
Evolution of Maevic hubs. Its a bit of a story and
I think it’s quite cool and it’s got a lot of
information in there. As always, click on the round globe to subscribe to GMBN Tech and tell all your mates that
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