How To Wheelie On An Electric Mountain Bike | E Bike Skills

How To Wheelie On An Electric Mountain Bike | E Bike Skills


– When it comes to wheelieing your e bike, it can be pretty tricky, especially with all that power
on top from eco to turbo, and that weight of the
motor in the battery. Things can get pretty tricky, so today I’m going to
teach you how to wheelie your e mountain bike. (mellow music) (electronic beeping) So the wheelie family consists
of four different members. First up, you’ve got the manual. Now the manual, something you
might see the BMX guys do, is where they’re behind the saddle with their arms out straight pushing the bike forward without pedaling. Next up you’ve got the coaster wheelie which is a sat-down wheelie
where you’re lifting the front wheel up without pedaling going down the hill while seated. Quite often seen on
steep downhill sections. Next you got the power wheelie, which is out of the saddle
where you’re constantly turning the cranks and keeping
the front wheel lifted. Often used on technical trail situations. And lastly you got the
sat-down pedal wheelie, which is what I’ll going to teach today, where you’re sat down pedaling along and keeping that front wheel high. So why should you wheelie? Well, the wheelie is an invaluable tool out on the trail. It’s going to lift that
front wheel up over rocks, roots, and trails obstacles, so you’re just going to be
focusing on the back wheel. You’re not going to get
the chance of sliding out or losing grip or bashing the front wheel on those obstacles. Also, it’s a really cool one to show off to your mates and impress them in the car park, out on the trail, on the fire roads–the wheelie is king. (mellow music) If you’re trying to do this
in the middle of the woods, where you got rocks, roots, and big holes, and puddles–things like
that are going to sap all your energy out and lose the flow. You’re definitely not
going to be able to do it. So, finding a nice open place, just like this empty car park, even on grass is good ’cause it gives you that little bit more
confidence if you do loop out, but just make sure that
grass is nice and firm. There’s no big holes as well. So, big open space, somewhere
you’re feeling confident, and slightly uphill is going
to make things easier as well because you can push into the hill and drive the bike up. If you’re trying to do it downhill, the bike tries to disappear down the hill, and even on the flat it can
become a little bit harder, so slightly uphill, big
open space is the one. (mellow music) Well, what power mode and what gear should you be in to do a wheelie? Well, there’s three options
when it comes to the power. You got eco, trail, or boost. Problems with boost: it’s going to be too much power, it’s quite uncontrollable,
especially when you get that big surge to lift the front wheel. It’s going to be quite a lift. You have to grab a load of back brake, and you often find yourself just doing kind of mini-wheelies, then
grabbing the back brake and bringing the front wheel down. In eco on the other hand,
you got not enough power and can sometimes be quite hard to lift that front wheel, so I suggest kind of like a trail or a
medium kind of power mode to get that front wheel high. That way it’s going to
be the most controllable. And as for gears, you want to go mid-range on the cassette as well. If you go too easy gear,
you’re going to find the crank spinning round
at really high cadence. That way you’re not going
to have enough drive to lift the front wheel up, especially if you pick up a little bit of speed in the wheels. And on the other side of the scale, if you’re too hard a gear, you’re going to find
you’re going to bog down, and you’re not going to be able to lift the front wheel up, even
in the highest power modes. So, gear selection and power
mode is definitely vital. (mellow music) I think when you’re learning
it’s actually easier to do a wheelie with the seat raised. That way acts as more of a lever, and can actually accentuate
that weight shift backwards by keeping your bum in the seat at a higher point. You got a higher pivot point and the front wheel will lift easier, but just bear in mind, it’s
going to make it a lot harder to get off the bike if you do
go past that balance point. I think once you’ve got
your wheelies dialed, it is easier to actually
have the seat down. That way it lowers your
center of gravity as well. Gives you a lot more control
moving around on that bike. You don’t feel like you’re perched up really high and can’t get your feet down. So slammed once you’ve
learnt, maybe try it high. It’s up to you. It’s got a total personal
thing to try it up and down. Find out what suits you. (mellow music) So the basic part of a wheelie is actually finding the
balance point of your bike. Now that’s the sweet
spot where the bike wants to sit naturally on the back wheel. The front wheel doesn’t want to drop and it doesn’t want to
fire you out the backdoor. Now a really good way of
finding the balance point of your bike is to get up over your bike, hold the back brake on,
and pull it up in the air, and you almost feel where it
feels almost like weightless. It’s not wanting to drop. It’s not wanting to fall over backwards. You can sit on your saddle as well to actually accentuate
that movement a bit more. You can almost let go of your brake to find out when the bike sits there. That is the actual sweet spot, and that is where you need to be when you’re doing a wheelie. Any lower and you’re going to be
fighting the bike all the time and any further backwards… Well, you’re going to be out the backdoor. (mellow music) Right, so let’s get that
front wheel off of the ground. Get that front wheel high. Right, you need to come into your spot that you’re going to do your
wheelie with good speed. We’re not talking flat-out sprinting, we’re talking kind of
like a jogging pace– not too fast, not too slow. You’re also going to need
to get your pedals level. Once you’ve found your zone
you’re going to wheelie, you need to load the
front suspension fork up by getting your weight
over the front of the bike, then you squash the fork, and once the front fork
is rebounding back, that’s when you need to do
your weight shift backwards onto the saddle and push down hard with the front foot as well, so give a big power surge to the motor and keep that pedals going. You don’t want to stop pedaling
because the front wheel is going to drop straight away. And also you need to keep
pulling with your arms back ’til you hit that sweet spot that we talked about earlier in the video. Get in that sweet spot,
then if you find yourself going too far backwards in the wheelie, like you’re going to fall onto your back, then it’s time to regulate that back brake and just scrub a little bit. You need to feather the
back brake is really key. You don’t go grabbing
that ’cause if you grab it’s going to pull the front
wheel down straight away, so just scrub that back brake to stay in that balance point, but if you feel you’re
front wheel’s dropping, then you need to let go of the back brake and pedal hard to regain
that point of the sweet spot. So there you go. I really hope you’ve enjoyed today’s video on how to wheelie on your e bike, However, if you’re not
getting that front wheel high here’s a few little tips for you. So you definitely need
to loop out on your bike. So looping out on your
bike, I mean you go past that balance point and you
have to jump off the back. If you haven’t done that, then you’re not going far enough back. There is a very fine point of balance. Secondly is the actual
balance point itself. If you’re below it, you’re
going to be fighting the balance all the
time, and trying to pedal to lift that front wheel up. You need to go up into the balance point, maybe even slightly past it, then grab the back brake
and go back into it. You don’t want to be constantly pedaling to try and lift the front wheel up. And lastly is faith in your back brake. 70% of the wheelie is in your back brake and learning how to regulate that. So regulate that back brake, try and find that balance point, and just to loop out. Remember to use that back brake if you don’t want your back broke. So, if you want to
check out another video, check out Manual Mistakes, that one’s down here. Don’t forget to subscribe to EMBN by clicking the globe in
the middle of the screen. Drop some comments in the box below about how you learnt to wheelie and all your mistakes that you’ve made; get involved. Click the notification bell to receive a notification every time we do an upload. And we should see you in the next one.