How To Wheelie | GCN’s Pro Tips

How To Wheelie | GCN’s Pro Tips


Wheelieing a road bike. It makes you look cool,
and gives you street cred. Guys, Peter Sagan
wheelies, it must be cool. (upbeat music) Right, before we get on with the tutorial, a couple of recommendations
when it comes to your bike and also your wheelieing venue. Firstly you want to choose somewhere which is ever so slightly uphill. That’s gonna make it easier for you to get your front wheel off the ground, and also easier for you
to control your speed. Also, if you’re new to this, which you probably are,
watching this video, try and do it on something
which is slightly softer than tarmac. That way it’s not gonna hurt as much if you do happen to come off. Also try to do it on a calm day, because if there’s any wind, especially if you’ve got a
deep-sectioned front wheel, that can really throw
you off your balance. And finally, use flat pedals
when you’re starting out. You do not want to be
locked into clipless pedals when you’re learning to wheelie. Other than that though we’re going to leave the bike the same, because ultimately, you
want to be able to wheelie your ordinary road bike. Right, let’s get started by practicing getting that front wheel off the ground. And this is where gear
selection becomes important because not only are you using your body to pull your front wheel up, simultaneously you’re going to be pushing through the pedals, so you want to be in a nice
easy gear to start with. Roll along at just below walking pace, and then, staying seated,
hold onto your hoods, and then bend your elbows slightly, and pull the wheel up while simultaneously pushing down on the pedals
with your favoured foot. Now you want to push down from around the two o’clock position, and your front wheel
should be off the ground by the time you’re down to the
bottom of the pedal stroke. Initially what you want to concentrate on is getting your front wheel off the ground whilst keeping the bike straight. As you get more confident, you will find that eventually, you’re getting to the balance point and sometimes even over it. It’s at this point that we will tell you that you’re back brake,
when you’re wheelieing, is your best friend. In essence, applying your back brake will pull your front wheel
back down to the floor. So that’s the next thing to practice. Pull your front wheel up, and get used to pulling
on your back brake, and coming back down again. Eventually, we want to just
be dabbing the back brake slightly, in order to stay in
the balanced wheelie position. But for now, it’s just
about getting your brain used to using the back brake. That’s really important. Once you’ve spent a fair amount of time practicing getting that front wheel up, and also engaging your brain as to what the back brake does, you should be able to then get yourself to the balance point at the end of your first
push through the pedals. If you pull your front
wheel up slightly too much, remember it’s now time
to dab your rear brake. And what you need to get used to is dabbing the brake enough
that you don’t fall off the back but not so much that your front wheel comes crashing down to the ground. When your front wheel does begin to come back down to the floor, putting a little bit more
power through the pedals should send it back up again. Again, like the brake, not too much, just subtle pushes is what you want. (relaxed music) What you may well find after
a good deal of practice, is that you are easily finding
your front to rear balance point but you’re going off
to the left and to the right. And that’s where moving your wheel around, and your knees, comes into play. (relaxed music) And this same technique actually, is how you can start to turn corners whilst you’re in a wheelie. So leaning the bike ever so slightly one way or the other, will
mean that you can negotiate some small turns, all the
time using that front wheel, and your knees, to stay
on your chosen line. Now, like everything in life which gives you this much street cred, a wheelie is not something which you are going to be able to pick up overnight. It’s going to take a lot of time, a lot of patience, and a lot of practice. And we would love to hear
how you get on though, you can leave your thoughts and comments in the section just down below this video. And if you’re experiencing any problems, leave them there as well, and we, or other viewers, will try
to answer them for you. Now if you’ve enjoyed this video please give it the thumbs up, subscribe to this channel by clicking on the globe right now, and then a couple more
street cred videos for you, down here is how to bunny hop, and down here is how to track stand.