How to Triathlon Transition Properly: Swim to Bike Transition 1

How to Triathlon Transition Properly: Swim to Bike Transition 1


(bike chain) Morning Trianiacs. Check this out. Fastest bike to run transition in history, right there that was it. So, as you’re all preparing for your races you’re probably wondering
how do I transition? How do I go from one event to another? Well, right after I go for this run I’m gonna meet you at home
and I’m going to give you seven steps to get you
from the end of the swim through to the start of the bike with as little damage as
possible to your body, and to your race time. Let’s do it. (upbeat music) Well, all right Trainiacs, it’s not quite our normal set back home, but I tried to spruce
it up, tried to let in a little bit of natural light. Tried to get a plethora of
helmets and shoes behind me. Let’s talk about transitions.
So, transitioning from the swim to the bike
or the bike to the run has been called the fourth
discipline of triathlon. It’s right up there with
nutrition as far as importance because if you spend a
lot of time in transition or, if you just simply
execute your transition wrong, you’re going to do things
like drive up your heart rate unnecessarily, ruining
the rest of the race. You’re going to spend
more time in transition then you need to, ruining
your overall race time. You’re going to do unnecessary
things, and, frankly, being better prepared for
how to handle transition coming into it is going to allow
you to feel more confident, and if you feel more confident
you’re probably going to perform better. So you can
walk up to the start line feeling confident, get across
your race line feeling strong. So what I want to walk through
right now is the entire process of transition 1. Going from the swim to the bike. And this entire process
actually starts in the swim, and ends all the way up until about 10 minutes into the bike. So that’s what I’m going
to take you through with this seven step
process to get through transition 1 as fast, as efficiently, and as intelligently as possible. Let’s start off with the end of the swim. A lot of coaches and triathletes believe that at the end of the
swim, what you need to do is kick really hard as
you’re coming into the end of the swim, to wake up your legs because they haven’t been
kicking very hard to begin with throughout the swim. Because
triathletes don’t kick a lot in the water, especially if they’re wearing a wet suit. I could
not disagree with this more. Legs are huge muscle groups.
They use a ton of oxygen. And from the standpoint
of age group triathletes, kicking really hard
doesn’t really provide us with any sort of propulsion. We don’t have a really
strong kick, so we might only be giving ourselves
anywhere from 0 to 3 percent more propulsion if we’re
kicking really hard. But if we’re kicking really
hard, what’s going to happen? Our heart rates gonna go through the roof. And what we want to minimize
throughout an entire triathlon are serious heart rate spikes
because what that does, is it ends up basically
burning some matches. It’s one red X on your race plan if you have a serious
heart rate spike because that burns a ton of energy. And efficiency is the name of the game. So my belief is that your legs are awake. This idea that they’ve
gone to sleep and don’t know how to walk is silly.
We go from lying down on the couch for XX
minutes, 2 hours, 4 hours, to standing up, and
everything is just fine. So it’s not like our
legs forget how to kick. If anything, what I would say, is in the last 1 to CC meters
before the end of the swim, actually just focus on
calming yourself down. So I would say actually, in the last little while of the swim, chill out. The next phase is in the few
seconds after you stand up. When you stand up out of the
water, you’re going to be going from a horizontal
position, which you’ve been in from anywhere from 10 minutes to 2 hours, and then all of a sudden boom! Your entire body has to
hold up its entire weight. The weight isn’t displaced
by all of that water, providing buoyancy, or a
wet suit providing buoyancy, or being horizontal. You
are going to have to hold up your entire body weight and run. This is just as important a
skill to train yourself in as it is to go from biking to running. So how you do this is by doing deck ups. Deck ups are a swim skill that
you build into your swim sets in the 3 months leading up to your race, where all you simply do is at certain points throughout your workout and on Teamtrianiac.com
it’s all laid out when our athletes do it, you just
build it into your work out. Where you hop up on the
deck, you run for 10 seconds, jump back in. This is
going to train your body to go from swimming,
to vertical, to running without having (gasp) another
huge heart rate spike. Because we want to limit that. The third thing that I
want you to think about is bike placement. This
starts when you’re setting up transition. So lets say
that this is transition. And lets say that over
here, at the top corner is the transition exit. If you look at the Ironman
All World Athlete bonuses the incentives for being an
Ironman All World Athlete. Most of the time the spots
for those All World Athletes is located right near the exit. Most of the time the
dedicated spot for the pros is right near the exit of transition. Why this is is you want
as much time as possible where you can run without your bike. Now what you might be saying is that a really good
transition is probably going to mellify having to run with your bike, and you’re either going
to have to do it in transition 1 or transition 2. But you ideally want to
have that set up as close to the exit as possible.
It’s where pros want to be, it’s where the elite
age groupers want to be, it just ends up resulting in less time that you’re spending having to do a bunch of things with your bike. And if it’s good enough for
them, it’s good enough for you. So if you can get into
transition earlier in the morning and position your bike
closer to that exit, if you do have a choice,
that’s where you want to do it. Fourth thing, and this
is a really big thing is how to remember where
you placed your bike. There are a lot of times
that people are running through transition and
even if it’s XX seconds, XXX seconds, 10 seconds,
having to look for your bike if you’re running past your bike, if you’re in the wrong lane for your bike. With this easy system
that I’m about to tell you it’s not gonna take you
anymore time to figure out where your bike is. So
it’s going to make sure that you don’t potentially
penalize yourself by adding time. So what you want to do is before the race starts, you want to create a landmark in transition. So you want to basically walk transition either the day before
the race or race morning basically from your
swim exit to your bike. And as you’re doing that
in a controlled fashion where there’s no consequences
and you can concentrate, look off to the right. Look to the left. Look on all of the bike racks. Look at what a marker is going to be that lets you know (snap) that’s where you go. So in my case, thinking back to Half
Ironman in Atlantic City, there was a tent on the left. So I ran up, knew that there was a certain
tent on the left, boom! I turn right. And then
what I did was I counted 1 bike rack, 2 bike racks,
I think it was 5 bike racks boom! That’s where I knew that’s
where my bike was going to be. And as I started getting into
the area I start slowing down. So to again, get my
heart rate under control. Fifth thing is changing. Do
you change in transition? No. You do not change going
from a swim to the bike. There is one exception, however. Ideally, you’ve chosen a race
that is a wet suit legal race. This is really good for
beginner triathletes because it provides you
with buoyancy in the water and a little bit of additional comfort. That makes me feel good about (keys rattling) quiet on set peep. So what you want to have done
is under neath your wet suit choose a race kit that is
going to allow you to just peel off the wet suit,
and go out to the bike. You don’t want to have to
change. Put on anything, take off anything. All
of that is lost time. Triathlon kits and
clothing is all designed to be worn from the start
to the finish of the race. And what I’ll actually do
is I’ll link to a video at the end of this video
that says what I recommend you wear that allows you to not have to change in transition. Nobody should change in transition. Except if you are in a non wet suit race and you’re a complete beginner
and you don’t yet have a swim skin. In that
case, it makes more sense to have just your triathlon
bottoms and then put your top on in transition because
that top in the water, if you don’t have a swim skin, if you don’t have a wet
suit on over top of it that’s going to create
a huge amount of drag. But that’s just basically gonna
be a water sail that’s like (imitation of a water sail) just catching all kinds
of water slowing you down in the swap. Don’t want that. The sixth and next to last thing is your transition setup.
What I recommend people do is they have every thing
that they possibly can set up before the race starts. So this means all of your nutrition is either taped to your bike, is either in a Bento box on the bike and nutrition could be in the back pockets of your kit, if you do have a wet suit that’s going on over top of it. And have your bike shoes
clipped into your bike already. So if that’s the case,
you’ve got your nutrition already on the bike, you have
your shoes already on the bike you have your nutrition
and anything that you need already in your kit. Only
think that’s left to do is put on your helmet, put on your sunglasses if you don’t have a visor on your helmet which is totally fine,
take your bike and out. That is how you have one
of the fastest transitions of the day. By not changing
and not having to do anything besides helmet on, bike out. Finally, lets say that you
have done all of that correctly and then you hop on your
bike and you start hammering because you’re like “hey
hey, Terrin just told me the sixth things that
I need to do, but no, I don’t think there was
a seventh.” There is. And you start hammering,
that’s going to shoot your heart rate up through the roof and it’s gonna be detrimental
to the rest of your bike and the rest of your run.
You’re gonna burn through more energy than you need, and
you’re not gonna be able to make up for that with
calories. And guess what? There are no heroes on race day. There are no restate theatrics.
If you burn extra energy, it’s gonna catch up to you later. So what I want you to do is
when you hop on the bike, ease into the power that you want to hold. In Challenge Roth,
2019, I spent the entire first hour of the bike building
up to my target race power. In Atlantic City, 2019,
where I think I had one of the top 5 fastest
bikes, I spent the entire first XXX minutes letting people pass me as I built up my power
to my target race power. So instead, what you do is
build up to your target power, controlling your heart
rate, easing into it, not letting that heart rate
spike. Hold your strong power throughout the end. Feel
great at the end of the bike all the way to the end of the bike. Then, boom. You can get on the
run and execute a great run and this is how you
get to your start line. Feeling confident that you know what’s gonna happen throughout that bike and run across that finish
line feeling strong. So those are the seven
stages of transition 1. It’s how to get through
transition 1 quickly without a detriment to your body. It’s going to allow you to
execute that great race. Now, if you want to see
that video on how to select what the right kit is you can
take a look at the video here and if you are a beginner triathlete who wants help figuring out how to get to your start line feeling
confident and across your finish line feeling
strong so that you can feel like a bad ass. And that’s what we all really
want, we just want to feel a little bit of excitement
because we are triathletes. And we are pushing ourselves.
That’s the best part of this sport. I love that about the sport and we put out videos on
YouTube every single week so hit that subscribe button below if you feel that would help you. Later Trianiacs.