How To Train Less And Ride Faster | Training Efficiently With The Time You Have

How To Train Less And Ride Faster | Training Efficiently With The Time You Have


– I think it might have
been Eddy Merckx’s fault. He was rumored to have said that the key to going fast, when cycling, is to just ride your bike,
ride your bike, ride your bike. For many of us, we end
up grinding out the same sort of rides week in and week out whether that’s the club
run on a Saturday or commuting to and from
work, Monday to Friday, and yet, despite putting in the hours, we don’t actually go any faster. – I guess the question we’re asking is, “If we train less, can we go faster?” (upbeat music) (upbeat music) – The first point is to really question what it is you’re trying to achieve every time you go out and ride your bike? Now, that doesn’t mean that you need to stop with the social rides, but what you should focus on is trying to increase the variation. So, going out for three days in a row and doing the same ride at
the same uncomfortable pace is actually highly unlikely to be achieving anything
other than making you tired and making you therefore,
a little bit slower. – Yeah, that’s right. Assuming you’re doing
around six hours a week, rest between those
sessions is your friend. If you decide to jump on your bike and do a two hour recovery ride, well, you’re just kidding yourself. If you make an effort
during that two hours, well that is two hours wasted. Unless, of course, that
you just enjoyed yourself, which is absolutely fine, but it wasn’t the focus of this video. – You should really make
the most of that down time in order to then enable you
to hit those really high peaks where you’re actually pushing much harder. That is what is going to
be getting you much fitter. Time in the saddle doesn’t automatically make you fitter at the end of the day. – Lack of rest and poor recovery is also the undoing of many cyclists. Riding that middle ground, where you’re not going hard enough and you’re not going easy enough either. (rejuvenating music) – As we’ve already
mentioned, you want to avoid doing the same rides, day in and day out. A great tip, is to try and
do your hardest sessions when you’re at your freshest, so the day after your recovery day. Now, save that for interval sessions where you’re doing anything
up to about five minutes. Because you’re a little bit fresher, you’ll be able to get
your absolute maximum out and really hit the right intensity, so your sprints, your anaerobic sessions anything else would VO2 max, really. – Then on your second day,
on another fresher day, why don’t you think about putting those longer efforts to work, so the 12 to 20 minute efforts, with a short break and then go again. – That’s really going to
polarize your training. Now that is not a new concept,
but it’s super popular with good reason, it’s
also very, very effective. By doing that, it’s doing your
high intensity stuff midweek when maybe you’re a little
bit shorter on time. You can still do your longer
endurance ride on a weekend. Perhaps you add in a social element by joining a cycling club. – So, basically, we’re
avoiding that middle ground where we’re just thumping on the peddles. (rhythmic music) – Right, you’re not going
to improve overnight. I mean that’s a given, but the more and more you push you limits, the more you’ll find yourself
to be able to go hard when it really matters. – That high intensity training is really gonna stimulate your body to adapt, in a far more time efficient way, then if you were just plodding along in that aforementioned middle ground. – Remember that recovery and
rest days are really important. You want to allow your
muscles to recover enough so when it goes hard,
you can go really hard. I would, at around three to four weeks, put in an adaptive week. This way, you can lessen the structure and focus more on the fun. – Just ease off on the training, I guess, as much a mental break
as a physical break, but this is the week in
which you will notice you’re actually improving. When you remove the training simulation, your body recovers and then when you step on
the gas, the week after, you should notice, I’m sure you’ll notice, that you have just got
significantly fitter. (upbeat music) – So now that we’ve
ditched those junk miles, and focused more on hitting
those higher intensities, we can now go out and smash our PV’s, on any ride and any segments. – I reckon that because
you’re a little bit fresher, you’ll probably enjoy it more as well, not to mention be more motivated for when you really do step on the gas. The other thing to take from this is that you don’t need to feel guilty about sacrificing other
aspects of life as well. (music screeching to a halt) (quiet drum beat music) – Doesn’t this all sound to good? Is there no downside to this? – Not really, no. If you’re a professional cyclist, you had all day everyday to train, then yeah, you would probably
want to do more hours. Then you’ve got more
time to recover from it, so the principle remains the same. You will ultimately reach a plateau. Some weeks, you’re gonna wanna do it harder than others still. No, it’s a great way for
most people to train. – Yeah, sounds ideal doesn’t it? – Happy days. (bicycle chain clicking – Well these were a
lucky find, weren’t they? Now, make sure you let us know
what you think about this. How comfortable are you with
the idea of riding less, but yet, getting fitter as a result? Get involved in the
comment section down below. – Yes, and if you did enjoy this video, then give it a big thumbs up. If you want to watch a video on how to get the most
out of your training, then why don’t you click down here. (music fading)