How To Spin Gears Like A Pro | Improve Your High Cadence Cycling

How To Spin Gears Like A Pro | Improve Your High Cadence Cycling


– Professional cyclists have experimented with different pedaling
techniques for decades. All basically in search of that holy grail that’s going to give
them the key advantage over their rivals. – In this video, we are going to show you the tools to be able to raise your cadence but do remember a high cadence may not make you faster in the short term but it might just help
you in the long term. Oh no, it’s raining! – England, finally! (bright synth music) Spinning means high-cadence, which we generally refer
to as upwards of 90 RPM. And this was a technique
that was highlighted in the late ’90s and early 2000s by a Texan who went by the
name of Lance Armstrong. Now what he found in grand tours was that spinning placed less fatigue on his muscular system which could get tired over the course of three weeks, and it placed more emphasis
on his cardiovascular system which did recover a lot quicker. Since then a lot of other riders have adopted this similar technique. – So, pedal quickly and
efficiently is the core skills. And it has some benefits. – It does. Yeah, starting with the
fact that if you have a limited cadence, you might
well have a limited speed. For example, if you’re
trying to chase onto a group at the end of a descent
and in your hardest gear you’re not going to go any faster than the cadence you can produce. And then of course, there’s track racing and fixed gear racing where
you’ve only got one gear. (bright synth music) – But when you’re riding on the roads, its a lot easier to sit at 80 RPM than it is to sit at say, 60. And that is because
you’re not transferring as much force down on the pedals to ride at a specific power. – That’s right, so power, less force which should mean less accumulated fatigue which is why James here
started this video. But although a high cadence may not make you faster straightaway, it should do eventually because you’ll be recovering from each and every session. And there’s another
benefit to high cadence and that is the ability
to change your speed. So regardless if you’re
racing and somebody attacks, or if you’re just on a group ride, somebody’s trying to pick
me to the top of the climb, you’re going to be far better and easier to respond to that attack if you spin a high cadence to begin with rather than bonk down in a big gear. (bright synth music) – So, James, what do you do if you want to increase your cadence? – Well Oscar, it’s funny you say that because we have not one but three sessions that will help you. So first, make sure
you’re set up correctly before going into these sessions. – Thankfully that set up is
not particularly complicated. It really just involves making sure that your saddle is at the
correct height for you. We’ve got a couple of videos here on Global Cycling Network that
will help you do just that, but the reason it’s important
is also very simple. If it’s too high, what
you’re going to find is that your pelvis rotates
over the top of the saddle. It’s going to be very hard
to keep a high cadence. Too low, and you’re going
to be equally uncomfortable. – So once you’re fully set up and you’re nice and comfortable, should we go on some sessions? – Yeah. Yeah, let’s go on to three sessions that will help you raise your cadence. – Let’s do it. (mellow hip hop music) – So first thing you want to find, a flat-ish bit of road
with some rolling hills and then you want to do
around a 15 minute warm-up. This will get the body nice
and warm for the sessions. Then select a gear that
allows you sitting around 56 to 70% of your FTP. – Then you’re going to be
doing six minute blocks, so that gear should also allow you to ride initially at 85 RPM, then over the course of
the first five minutes you want to gradually get up to 100 RPM. And then for the final minute of those six minute blocks you want to go up to over
110 RPM if you possibly can. Then take three minutes easy at your own self-selected cadence
and repeat it six times before a 15 minute cool-down. – So just remember,
the idea of the session is not meant to be a high intensity but merely it’s to work
on your aerobic endurance. So being able to spin a higher cadence. (mellow hip-hop music) – Session number two is like
a micro-interval session that is focused on cadence. So you want to get our
same 15 minute warm-up in, at which point you’re going
to start your first block where for the first 30
seconds you’re at 130 RPM, which is really going some. And then for the next 30 seconds, you’re down at 90. You can repeat this four
to six times per block and between you’re going to have a slightly longer recovery of
between five to six minutes. Try to get in four to
five blocks per session before you do cool-down. (mellow hip hop music) – You lot are going to
love this final section because what it is, is a
high cadence recovery ride. – Yes, and a high cadence recovery ride will help you recuperate from
those really hard work outs but it’ll also provide
you with active recovery. But mainly it will enable you
to pedal at high cadences. – It will indeed and the premise of it is very, very simple. You can do this on an indoor trainer, or out on the road, for
between 20 minutes and an hour. As ever with a recovery ride, you want it to be very light in intensity, less than 50% of FTP, but throughout you hold
a cadence of over 100. That’s right, you can recover and train something at
exactly the same time. – Let us know how you got on
with these training sessions. – Yeah, you can do that
by leaving a comment in the section just beneath this video. Today it was all about
spinning and high cadence, spin to win, but you’re also
going to need a decent FTP, if you’d like to improve
that, you can find a video right in the middle, just down here. – And if you did like this video, then don’t forget to give us a thumbs up. – (speaking a foreign language) – Hey man, I don’t know
what you’re talking about. It’s always sunny in England. – That’s what he said, isn’t it? Always sunny in England. It also rained on the Angler
Route I’ll have you know.