How to Set Up Cyclocross Bikes : How to Change a Road Bike to a Cyclocross Bike

How to Set Up Cyclocross Bikes : How to Change a Road Bike to a Cyclocross Bike


MICKEY DENONCOURT: So cross bikes look really
similar to road bikes, and the fit that you’re going for is really similar as well. Your
primary concern when you’re setting up a road bike is, you know, a powerful position, you
know, something where, you know, you’re efficient. And then the secondary thing is really more
aerodynamics. With a cyclocross bike, you know, we want to make sure that we’re creating
a lot of power, that, you know, we’re in a good, efficient position. But we also wanna,
you know, compensate more towards bike handling ability than aerodynamics. So usually, what
you see with a cross bike is you run less drop between your seat and your saddle and
a slightly shorter reach, so that the bike handles a little bit better in, you know,
rough terrain and, you know, loose conditions and stuff like that. Because instead of just
riding on pavement, you know, you’re riding on grass and sand and, you know, mud and gravel
and all sorts of stuff like that. So the general rule of thumb is, you know, you ride the same-sized
cyclocross bike as you do a road bike. But things that are different is, you know, the
stand over–the height is a little bit lower on the cross bike, so it’s easier to get on
and off. And they tend to be a little bit shorter in the top tube to get your weight
more centered between the wheels for better handling. So, you know, sometimes people say
go one size down from a road bike to a cyclecross bike. You can do that. Oftentimes, the bike
ends up being too compact and you don’t have enough room to really get your hands through
the bike to get off and run with it and stuff like that.