How To Ride Drop Offs Like A Pro | Mountain Bike Skills

How To Ride Drop Offs Like A Pro | Mountain Bike Skills


♪ [music] ♪ – [Man 1] So how do you ride drop-offs?
The first thing to learn really is how to manual properly, and we’ve done loads of
videos on that already, so click down below. There will be a link in the
description for how to manual first. I’ll talk about that briefly now, but a
good manual is important, because you’ll be using your weight to lift the front
wheel, rather than using your arms. If you use your arms to lift the front
wheel, it’s easy for the wheel to go slightly sideways which can get you
in trouble on bigger drop-offs. But also, actually, you’re pulling the bars
up, and your weight is staying quite far forward on the bike. So if the front
wheel then drops too early on a drop-off, you’re in trouble. With the nice manual
technique, you can then start using that on drop-offs that are too big just to roll
down. So drop-offs become unrideable when they get so big that, actually, you
start catching your chainring on there, and that can lead to you going over the
bars. And if you have no experience with judging that, a good height to aim
for is axel height on your wheels. Anything above axel height means it’s
probably unrideable. That means you’re going to have to keep the front wheel up
to stop you from going over the bars. So the technique you actually use on that
drop off is going to depend on the run-out and the size of that drop. Here, we’re in
a really nice spot to practice the manual of the drop because it’s not very big.
I’ll get away with just rolling that if it all goes wrong. So, I spotted my landing,
and I’m going to try and do enough for manual to match that landing. So, by that,
I mean trying to land two wheels at the same time. If you’re dropping off into a
down-slope landing front wheels first is okay, because your front wheel’s getting
there first, but matching the landing is generally the best way of doing it. So,
here I’m going to judge my speed, and if I’m going slow, I want to pop a nice
little manual to keep my front wheel up and in the air until my back wheel gets
there and try to land two wheels at the same time. So it’s really important that
you use a good manual technique off a drop off, because the final position of a
good manual your hips will be nice and safe to the back of the bike. The heels
down and head up, so even if that front wheel drops on you more than you
expect, you’re right back here, and you’ve got a really good chance of
getting away with it. Whereas if you relied on the front wheel pull
with the handlebars, all your weight is then on the bars, and you could be in
trouble. So get those manuals now first. Drop-offs are possible on any bike, but
there’s a few little bike setup things that are going to help. Getting your seat
low and out of the way is going to give you more space to move back on the
bike. A shorter stem and a more aggressive bike, maybe full suspension bike, will
make it a little bit more forgiving, especially when you’re learning. So, once
you’ve got your manual technique nailed on the small drop-offs, well done. That’s the
real technique that you’ll always need, and, actually, when you start going
towards bigger drop-offs, it’s much safer to use a little bit more speed. The
technique gets much easier when you’re going a little bit faster. You start
forgetting about that big pump to manual to keep the front wheel up, and
with the extra momentum, you can just slide the bike forward in front of you.
You’ll end up in that same position to the rear of the bike. You just don’t need
that pump to keep the front wheel up higher, so that’s much safer to use
on a bigger drop-off like this, but it’s not rideable. You’ve got to do
something to get off this drop-off. Another thing to remember is your
entry point and exit point. That’s just a certain point on a trail where you want to
stop pedaling, stop braking and look where you’re going. Once you’re in, you’re
in. Do whatever you’ve got to do to get off that drop-off and same
on the way out. You’ve got to let the bike settle before we
start cornering, braking, peddling. So, here we got quite a tricky drop-off.
It’s got a really steep run in that’s actually quite slippy as well, so I need
to be on my brakes here. Otherwise, I’m going to fire off down the hill. There’s
that point of no return that when I get really close, I’ve got to come off the
brakes and do whatever I’ve got to do to get off this drop-off and match
the landing with my bike. Occasionally you might find that actually
bringing in a good bunny hop off the end of a drop-off will work nicely. You can
get in a bit off extra height and a bit of length and land into a bit of down-slope
that’s going to make it smoother. That’s when drop-offs almost turn
into road gaps or step downs. – [Man 2] So there you go, that’s how to
drop off. Remember, start nice and small before you work up to bigger drops. – Yeah, and definitely have
a look at our manual video, which is up there. The manual is an
essential technique for this and hopefully then go a little bit quicker, and you
don’t have to use it quite as much. – And for bigger drops like that
one, where you can get to a nice transition, you should check
down here for how to bunny hop. – See right there is loads of fun
drop-offs. And as always, you can click on us to
subscribe to the channel. – You won’t miss a video. – All right, that one next.