How To Ride Braking Bumps | Mountain Bike Skills

How To Ride Braking Bumps | Mountain Bike Skills


– One of the things
you’re gonna have to deal with riding in bike parks is braking bumps. What are braking bumps? Well, it’s this washboard
sort of surface that you see on the approach to fast turns. And the reason braking bumps are there is simply because people
are grabbing a handful of brake before hitting that turn, and the bike is skipping
around on the rough terrain. Successively, with more and more riders, they turn into real
rough washboards and they can be really painful on your hands. So here are our best tips
to handle brake bumps. (electronic rock music) This is a fairly typical turn that you can expect to see braking bumps before. It’s got a really fast approach and people spot the left-hand turn and start grabbing a handful of brakes, and that’s when a bike
skips around on the surface. Just like that. So, there’s two things
you can do about this. The first is to control your speed, long before you get to this, and as you come around the
turn, you don’t have to brake. There is enough support
in the turn for that. Now it’s a lot easier on your hands if you’re not braking and
turning at the same time. The second option, as you can
do quite easily on this turn, is take a nice, inside line. It’s nice and smooth. There’s still plenty of
turn to support your riding. So I’m just gonna show you the two different options you’ve got here. The first time, I’m gonna
come in, control my speed before the turn and stay high on the line, just roll through those braking bumps. And second option, I’m not gonna do that. I’m gonna cut the inside of the turn and skip ’em out altogether. (jazz music) As well as learning your braking points and the right line to ride braking bumps, setting your bike up well to deal with it is actually really important. Now whether you’re
riding the downhill bike, trail bike, or enduro bike, the
principles are all the same. So, first up is your brake lever position. So, a lot of people run
their brakes quite far down, but if you’re running in
a bike park that’s gravity focused, like Whistler, for example, you want your brakes actually
to be a little bit higher up, because the more you’re
reaching for the brakes, the more pressure you’re actually putting on your thumb and onto your
hands to grip the handlebars. You want your hands to be
nice, loose grip on the handlebars, which might
be counter intuitive but the death grip isn’t
gonna make things easier, ’cause your forearms are
gonna tense up and your hands are gonna be gripping too much. You want a nice, relaxed
grip on the handle bars and a brake lever that’s within easy reach when you’re in a downhill,
aggressive riding position. Moving your brake levers
in as far as you can, so your fingers are right on
the end of the brake levers is best because it’s a
real powerful position for your hand to be in. It might feel a little
unnatural at first, but again it’s all about emphasising
the point that you don’t want to be holding on and
braking as hard as you can. You want it to be a
relaxed, natural position when you’re on the bars. A lot of people tend to
run their tyres quite firm in bike parks to avoid getting punctures. But you should see how much shock that can transmit through to your hands. So it’s well worth lowering the
pressure of your front tyre. Even if a few PSI can really
make a big difference. Also consider your
front suspension set up. If you’re running your bike a bit firm, for jumping and having fun like that, it’s actually gonna
transmit even more shock through to your hands,
so consider running it a little bit softer, up
to 30% sag, and perhaps a few clicks less on
rebound, just to give it a nice, pattery feel. Hopefully this video on
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