How To Protect Your E Bike From Winter

How To Protect Your E Bike From Winter


– E-mountain bikes was
designed to be ridden in the nastiest conditions possible. Mud, rain, they love it, it’s where they can actually out-perform a standard mountain bike. However, if you’re not
taking the right precautions and doing the right things
on your E-mountain bike, one ride in winter conditions can make that bike look pretty shabby. So today, taking a look at a
few tips to survive winter. (dramatic electronic music) (relaxing lounge music) So first up, you should buy yourself a decent set of mudguards. Not only do they protect you, they’re going to protect your bike. Now these come in front and rear specific, all different shapes and sizes. Let’s take a run through of
all those different mudguards. So the options for a front
mudguard are pretty simple, you have this flap-style of mudguards, which is super simple to
fit, they’re super cheap, and do a really good job of protecting all that
spray from the front wheel. Although, if you’re going pretty fast, sometimes you’re going to
get mud past this guard and can actually get on
the bike and over you. So I suggest going to a
bigger front mudguard, kind of like this moto-style one as well. These are really good at
protecting the bike and you from all that spray from the front wheel. You can literally ride
with no eyewear on this because it does such a good job of protecting all that spray, and your bike won’t get
as covered in mud as well, so a really good option for an E-bike is to go for that bigger front mudguard. So your options for the rear of the bike, now there’s a few different mudguards. There’s a basic minimalistic
mudguard, this is really cool, it just clips underneath the seat rails. What it’s going to do is just protect you from that spray from the back wheel. You will obviously get a
bit of over-spray from that if you’re going to go
fast, but for commuting and the light road work,
that’s going to save you from getting a wet behind. Now this is an interesting little guard. This is basically a rear mudguard, it doesn’t necessarily
protect you so much, it protects more of the
bike and the linkage, and what it’s going to do is
just stop that build up of dirt coming behind linkage plate and the shocks and things like that. This is cut down on the amount
of time you’re going to spend washing the bike in getting
all that mud buildup behind there and into the motor, it stops that water from
getting into the motor as well. Now if you want to protect
yourself from the mud, there is no other option
than a big rear mudguard such as this one. This clips on to the
seat stays of the bike, and what it does, it protects
all that spray coming at you from the back wheel. Now these can get a bit heavy, especially if you get a lot of mud on them and you’re flapping around on the trails. So if you are charging the downhill stuff and jumping your bike, something like this
might not work for you. But if you’re riding
cross-country, trails or road work, this is the best job for protecting you from all that rear wheel spray and mud. (relaxing lounge music) So before winter really sets in, it’s worth whipping the
battery out of your E-bike, especially if you just charge
the battery in the bike all the time because you don’t
ever take the battery out. It’s just worth checking those connections in the back of the battery, in the frame, just to make sure there’s not debris and wetness getting in there. If there is, you need to clean it out, just make sure there’s
good contact in there. A really nice way of stopping water getting into that connection
is by using dielectric grease. And that’ll actually perform a barrier to stop water getting in,
and improve the connection between the battery and the connection. (relaxing lounge music) Now the motor on your E-bike is pretty well protected
from the elements. It has outer plastic casings on it that’s going to protect
it from all that debris that’s going to fire up from the wheels. Now a really good thing
to do before winter is just inspect that motor covering. Just inspect it for
loose bolts and cracks. And a lot of them will
actually have a drain hole in the bottom of it, so just whip off those outer motor covers. I stress that enough
because you don’t want go into the motor inner metal covers, just these outer plastic ones
actually house the motor. But in there, you’ll find
just a housing in there. As I say, just make sure there’s not a build up of dirt in there because if you get water going in there, it’s going to sit with that debris, and it could essentially
flood that whole area. So really essential that
drain hole is unplugged to allow the water to
drain out the motor casing. (relaxing lounge music) If you’re riding muddy trails and you haven’t got a
front mudguard fitted, then one bearing that is
in the direct firing line of all that debris and
water off the front wheel, it’s going to be your
lower headset bearing. Now this is going to be straight in there and it’s literally going to get
jet-washed by all that spray off the front tire, so
it’s a really good idea just to drop the forks
out, service that headset, and just stick a bit of extra grease, especially around that lower bearing race. That’s going to create another seal to protect you from all that water that’s driving in off the front wheel. Once you’ve got the headset out, it’s really important to inspect
the seals and the bearings, and replace if necessary. (relaxing lounge music) Now a muddy bike is a heavy bike, and a heavy bike is an inefficient bike, so you’re going to be
losing out a little bit out on the trails. Now this little hack is
borrowed from motocross. Now on a motocross bike,
they have loads of area that mud can build up, and
it can become a nightmare when you come to wash it, as well as all that weight from the mud that’s going to be built up on the bike. Now this, you just need
to get a bit of sponge or a bit of foam, and cut it to size, a custom bit that’s going to
fit in all those little crevices and holes that a potential
build up of mud could occur. Now this is just around
the back of the battery. I’ve cut it to size, it’s
just going to fit down there. Not only is it going to
stop that mud building up, it’s going to cut down
on washing time as well. (relaxing lounge music)
(stones rustling) Now the tires you run on
your E-bike for winter, something you definitely
want to take a look at, these can play a massive part on how the bike’s going to
perform out on the trail. Starting with the back of the bike, you want a rear tire that’s
going to provide a lot of drive out of those really wet and slippy climbs. As well as it comes to
downhill, you want something that’s going to be hooking up. And on the front, you want
something that’s again, that’s going to bite hard in those corners but is going to clear easy. So there is a lot of
mud-specific tires out there but these can be quite draggy, especially if you’re not
riding in just pure mud. If you’re riding things like
a fire road or road sections linking those trails together, they can take a lot of
range out the battery. So really worth looking at a tire that’s going to tick all of those boxes, not just necessarily a mud-specific one. (relaxing lounge music) The chain on your E-bike is
one of the most important parts of your bike you need to care
of over the winter months. If you’re taking bad care of your chain, it’s simply going to accelerate
all that wear on the components and on the drivetrain. One thing you need to get in the habit of is degreasing and lubing that chain before and after every ride,
and using the right lube. Now you might be thinking
what I mean by the right lube. Now you’re going to get wet and dry lube. For winter, in rain and horrible slop, you need to be using wet lube. If you use dry lube, that’s
simply going to come off as soon as any water
gets in contact with it. If you use a wet lube, it penetrates the rollers on the chain a lot deeper, and it simply won’t wash off
as soon as you hit any water. (relaxing lounge music) One thing that can take
an absolute hammering over the winter months is your brake pads. Not only is it because you’re
going to be using your brakes maybe that little bit more, it’s because of all the grinding paste that actually is going to
flick up onto the rotors and be transferred onto those pads. And when you pull the brake on, you got that horrible grit and grime, and then you’re squeezing it onto metal so it’s going to wear those
pads out a lot faster. Now one thing you should consider doing is if you running organic brake pads, is swapping them out to sintered. Sintered pads are going to give
you a lot longer brake life when it comes to those
horrible winter months. (relaxing lounge music) One thing that can age a
brand new bike is cable rub, crank rub, it’s all those
unsightly areas on your bike when you’ve got nice paint,
and you’re suddenly met by a horrible shiny area
where a cable’s been rubbing. And this is only going to be
accelerated as soon as you enter nature’s grinding paste into the mix. It’s simply going to rub that
metal down to the bare aluminum, or carbon or whatever
your bike’s made out of. Now a really good way of
protecting against this is simply by using
stick-on protective patches or invisiFRAME kits,
that you can pretty much place over the bike, over
either the whole bike or in areas that are going
to be prone to cable rub such as the head tube and
your rear chain stays. And aftermarket, you can sometimes get some crank protectors as well because between your shoe and the crank is quite a common place to
get a lot of grinding paste mixed in of that aluminum and soon, a black crank can be turned
to silver quite easily. So it’s really worth protecting those high-wear bits on your bike, just identify them
before you get out there. Just spin the bars, look
to where the cable rubs, and get something stuck over it before it goes back to bare aluminum. (relaxing lounge music) Something a lot of pro riders do when the conditions get
real slippy and nasty is do a few mods to their bikes. Now I’ve seen the downhill
guys even add bits of tire to their saddles, just to
give them a little more grip and purchase from their saddle. Now something you guys can do to your cockpit area of your bike, like your controls, your brake levers, your gear shifter, your dropper, is to add a little bit of grip tape to it. This is pretty much sticky-back sandpaper, so you can get on your controls, add that to all your little bits that you’re going to be pushing that you can potentially slide around on. Just means that it’s going to be there when you’ve got wet and muddy
hands on all those controls. So there you go, I don’t
want to hear any excuses about not getting out around
those nasty winter rides. But if you guys got any
more tips you want to add, drop them in the comments box down below about how you protect your
E-bike in the winter months. Don’t forget, if you want to
stick around and see more videos, check me out riding in the mud down here, that was a pretty nasty one. Don’t forget to subscribe to EMBN, and if you’re all already subscribed, smash the notification bell in the corner to get a notification every
time we upload a video. Don’t forget to give a
thumbs up, like as well, and we shall see you in the next one.