How To Prepare Your Mountain Bike For Winter | Riding In Cold & Wet Conditions

How To Prepare Your Mountain Bike For Winter | Riding In Cold & Wet Conditions


– So, it’s the day before
you’re going riding and it is absolutely horrible weather. What to do? Well, here are some
quick, last-minute changes you can make to make your
winter riding a whole lot more pleasant. (dramatic drum beat) (metallic slicing) (upbeat music) A more aggressive tire
run at lower pressures would certainly give you more grip. Now, personally for
me, rolling resistance, or at least worrying about it kind of goes out the window when the
trails turn to slop. I want something that’s
going to give me lots and lots of traction, so I
want quite a big aggressive tire on the front. Now, obviously all your
steering is done on the front, but so is most of your braking, and if you’re watching out on the front it just undermines the whole ride for me, so I try and stick with lots of grip. Now, and a last minute change you can make is just to drop a few PSI. Run a bit softer, this
will help the tire to form and conform to the ground a lot better, delivering you more grip. (upbeat music) So you’ve got the bona fide
best bike in the world, and tires grippier than
a Martin Scorsese epic, but all of that isn’t
going to count for much if you can’t bloody see. Now, personally, I always
run a mudguard, year round. In the summer I might not go
for something quite as long as this, but vision for me is of absolute paramount importance. So, in winter, moving away
from something like maybe a kind of a shorter, stubbier guard, I go for something a lot longer, you go for something like
this which is medium length or the whole enchilada here. But, it gives you so much
more confidence knowing you’re not going to have
your vision taken out with a splat of mud as you
come around a corner. (upbeat music) Most mountain bike helmets
come with adjustable visors. Now, whereas the visor
in the summer months can sometimes feel like an
impediment of your vision, in winter it can be all the opposite. If you lower it a touch, you
might see it at the very top of your vision, but it’s
going to keep a lot of debris out of your eyes. So have a little bit of an experiment, run it a bit lower perhaps
and see how you go on. Trousers. Trouser, trouser, trousers. For years I thought they were low-brow, moto-mimicking nonsense
and I put my hands up because I was wrong. Being able to take off a
set of trousers and be clean underneath is an absolute godsend. Some are waterproof, some aren’t. It doesn’t necessarily matter that much, it’s just great to have
something that gives an extra layer of protection
against the elements. (upbeat music) I’m going to be honest with you guys, in the summer months, often
I’ll wear a cotton t-shirt as I jump out the office
for just a few hour spin, but in colder conditions,
especially when temperatures reach around zero, these things might not
be so good for riding. That sweat patch of doom
can turn to an icy disaster, so stick with nice and
breathable base layers and jerseys as they will
actually keep you warmer and more comfortable over longer rides. (upbeat music) Dry lube is something that I use a lot of. All through the summer months
it’s my absolute go-to. It runs clean and efficiently
and I don’t think anybody could really argue with that. But, if your drive train is
going to be in the firing line of some hefty puddles, maybe
it’s not the one to go for. In winter months I’m definitely
reaching for the wet lube. (upbeat music) Letting the motor dry before cleaning it can be an absolute nightmare
and a bucket of wash can be your best bet, but
what to do if you haven’t got those at hand? Well, the homemade pressure
wash, a la the water bottle, can often be the way to go. (upbeat music) Something like a hearty old
bag for life is a great way to keep all the mud in one place, and stop it contaminating
your car, house, whatever. Another good tip is to take
that bag and give your clothes a bloody good rinse before slinging them in the washing machine, to
save dividing the household into two as you potentially
write off a machine machine thanks to excess amounts of mud and grit. I don’t know if it’s a bit of
an old wives tale that one, but I’m pretty cautious
and always give my clothes a quick rinse. And there we go. Some quickfire tips which
I hope have been a help. Now, if you want to stay with
the channel, click down here to see Doddy investigate
some fork suck down and it’s appropriate
remedies and click down here for some winter upgrades. Thank you very much for
watching, don’t forget to like and subscribe and we’ll see you next time.