How To Plan A Route On Komoot | Mountain Bike Route Planning

How To Plan A Route On Komoot | Mountain Bike Route Planning


– Feels like we’re living
in a pretty modern age where there’s loads of cool places to go and ride your mountain bike. – Ya like bike parks, trail centers, but what if you’re super
bored with these things and you want to seek more adventure? – Or maybe do an end to end ride, or find some undiscovered
secrets near to you. Well, we’re going to show
you how to use something, I’ve been using a lot recently. – I’m pretty late to the party, so I’m going to jump on that
late night bus for sure. – This is how to plan a ride using Komoot. – All right Neil, before
we get started, question. What is Komoot all about? – So it’s online planning
and navigation tech. So you can use their website
or use their app on your phone, to basically plan rides
and find routes near you. Komoot are a partner here at GMBN
so we’re going to use Komoot, but there are other online resources. But I’ll talk you how to
do it through, on Komoot. And some of their
specific features as well. (upbeat music) Firstly, why? Well I tend to use a route planner for bigger cross country rides. Also, I’ve been trying to
get some miles in recently to improve my fitness after
recovering from injury, and I’ve moved to a new area, so I’m keen to find all the trails. – Okay, so you spend a few
minutes planning your route on your desktop, because I’m guessing that’ll be a better place to do it. – Yeah, you can do it
on the phone as well. But desktop is a richer way of doing it. You can really sort of get
into the details of the ride. – Now can I get that route
straight to my Garmin or any computer on my bike? – Yeah, so you can sync it up. Everything’s done pretty
much wirelessly nowadays. Garmin, you can use the IQ feature so on your phone, send it straight over to your Garmin computer. And then basically you
say “Ride that route.” And it’ll then give you sort
of step by step navigation. – No way! – And for some people, actually
just planning the route on the desktop might be enough. It gives you like a fly
through of the route, maybe if it’s a smaller ride. But for bigger rides, I
definitely like having it in front of me, none of
these old school maps and compasses, it’s all on here. – Modern technology. – You get the free download
of a region as well, which means you don’t use
your data when doing it. So you can use it offline. – That’s good. – Also, maybe you’re out back and beyond where you don’t have
signal so it’ll still work. – Yeah. Now you want to find inspiration to where you want to go ride. Now, I look at instagram. Pinterest as well! Randomly. But you can get inspired from
a few social media places to where to ride. – Komoot’s good as well. It shows you some really
cool routes on there and places other people have ridden. But first, back to the shed, I will talk you through how
to plan a ride using Komoot. Okay, so I’m back in the shed to show you exactly how to use Komoot. You can use the phone
app for planning routes, but I think it’s much better
to get yourself on a computer, use their web resource to do it. There’s much more detail. I think you can really
zoom in on the routes that were better so you can
know exactly what you’re riding. So, follow me along and
I’ll do it on my computer. (beat music) So let’s move on to actually planning a route. Click on the route planner
and plan your route. So of course you can choose
either a one way route or a round trip. This is a good part of the UK for riding, but I don’t know it very well at all. So what I’m going to
do is click on the map. Say start here. That is the Quantocks
if I’m right and then over here is Exmoor. Click over here and say right, I want to set that as a destination, and now you can pick what you want to do. It’s great for hiking,
bike touring, road riding, anything like that. Running. Mountain biking is over here. Or alpine mountain biking is basically the more technical version. So, if I choose that, there’s my stats. Expects me to take four and a half hours, cause I’m in good shape. You can click how good a
shape you think you’re in. It’s 45 kilometers, so pretty decent ride. 1200 meters of climbing. It’s difficult, expert mountain bike ride, very good fitness required. This is the really interesting part, down in the bottom left there, tells you exactly what
type of trail it is. So, single track, 15k path for 10k, road for 10k. Can you see how that changes? So if I change that
back to mountain biking, not mountain biking alpine, it’s basically going to make it easier. You’ll probably ride less
single track, bit more fireroad that sort of thing. So, we stick it back on alpine. See how the route changes. Goes past the beach. Here’s really good, so on
this elevation you can see how the highlights, so there
it’s red means that it’s super steep, so I’m going up 17%. And then underneath that,
it says single track S1. So that is the European
way of grading trails. S0, S1 fairly untechnical,
when you go up to something like an S2, S3, S4, S5 it’s getting more and more technical. So you can really delve into the trail and see how gnarly it’s going to get. This one doesn’t get any harder
than S1 by the looks of it. So actually I can maybe
start thinking about altering this route a little bit. Zooming it in and choosing a harder route. I actually find you
can look it up on here, you can choose different types of maps. Sometimes use Komoot
map, but actually I find Google Satellite is a
great way of doing it for mountain biking especially. So let’s get into these
woods and see what’s in it. Look over there, someone’s
added that trail, so that is going to be a
highlight I would have thought. Nice little features where
if you press M or Control + M on your keyboard, it makes
the blue line disappear, so you can see what’s under there. If I zoom into this bit, that
bit looks like single track. That bit looks a bit
wider, more like fire road. But actually what I want to do, cause I can see that looks good, I’m going to click on that and say “Ooh look, I’ve got a picture over here.” Holcombe, Holford Combe should I say. Let’s say “Include that on route.” Cause that looks like fun. You can see how it’s changed
my route a little bit. There’s the highlight. And that bit of trail is single track S1. You can really start tweaking
your route to try and find, there’s another one, there’s
more highlights here. So, I can start adding
or taking away these. There’s a cafe over there as well. Might want to stick that in there. Wonder what it’s going to do if I do that? Because, yeah it changes
the route quite a lot. But now, I’ve got a couple
of highlighted routes that someone’s ridden and someone has said “That is worthy of riding.” So, you can just basically
keep an eye on your stats on the side and see how it changes things. What am I on now? It looks like it’s suddenly
got a lot more hilly. Yeah, I’m up to 1380
meters of climbing now. Looks good to me. So, the other option is to
actually just pick up the route and drag it and move it over. You can see how that’s
changed it a little bit. The only thing that does is, basically when you click
start here and finish there, and Komoot does the hard work for you, it uses the algorithm to find the route that makes most sense. When you start dragging the route around, it doesn’t necessarily do that anymore. So it’s really cool to start tweaking it, but also making sure you’re
looking at the elevation profile to see if it makes sense basically, if you’re going down a
single track S1 rather than and it’s minus 10 degrees of incline. So 10 degrees down then you’re
probably thinking that’s going to be really good,
10% down should I say. Whereas if you’re going up a
17% piece of S4 single track, you’re thinking actually,
that’s probably be a hike-abike, that might not be the best. There’s a nice way of sort
of zooming in to sections of the trail as well, to
give you another great idea of what to expect. So if I highlight it down
here on the elevation profile and it’s showing up on the map as well. And then that’ll zoom it in. So now I can really take
the magnifying glass out and look what’s going on. So that bit is off grid and it’s steeper, so that’s one bit we
don’t know what to expect. Here it’s single track unpaved. 10%, well 9% recline. And that is approximately one
hour and 45 minutes in or 15k. So it’s a really good way
of knowing what to expect. But it also gives you that
way surface information, and it’s really interactive
so you can look at that elevation profile to
see how it corresponds, so it helps you determine where it’s best to climb or descend that section. But you can see, this is all climbing, that’s path, unpaved, 20%. So that’s going to be
pretty hard work actually. Also, you can see just before that bit of single track
starts, so in the woods there. I’ve routed in a nice little detour there because what is this? Horner Tea Rooms. There’s a picture of a
cup of tea and a scone. So, myself and Blake are
planning to stop there. Of course it’s good in Komoot,
to also find inspiration so a really easy way to find a route, is to look at someone else has been doing. So if you want to look at my
profile, find some good routes around the UK, Shropshire,
Wales, on the south-west. I’ve done some, so you click on my routes see my public routes. Get on there and basically it
will give you all the stats. So, how long it’ll expect
you to do it in so, a minute and nine it took me. It’s 10.7 kilometers,
there’s my average speed. There’s meters up, meters down. Another great thing
about Komoot is Pioneers. So up in this top corner,
click on Pioneers. So these are people that
are really active on Komoot. You can search for different
areas to find those people. Basically they give loads of information. They highlight routes,
highlight parts of routes. So you can really work out what might be the best place to go. They get up-voted by the people. And they score points basically, being a really active contributor. So they’re great people to follow, and maybe find some inspiration there. You can see who I’m
following, following GMBN so get over there as well. Follow us there. And GCN, seeing Blake down there. You can see what they’ve been up to, where they’ve been riding. Okay, so that’s how to plan the route. Back to the trail. So that’s it. Save tour, share it with your mates, invite them for the ride. You can then download
the gpx file if you want, send it to your preferred software to then upload it to your computer. Or like we said earlier,
you can use your Garmin IQ with Komoot, boom it’s on there. – If you don’t have a bike
computer, can you use your phone? – Yeah, absolutely you can. I guess the downside to
that is they’re just, well it’s your phone. They’re not very robust,
maybe not waterproof, but also the bike features
of your bike computer’s going to be better. So what I like is being able
to scroll through screens, so I’ve got my data there,
my distance, time of day etc. Then I’ve got my map so I can follow it. Then I’ve got elevation and then a compass and then my heart rate’s all graphed. So, it’s a bit more bike specific really. – It is. Yeah it is. – Don’t forget. If you’ve got a Komoot
account, to follow us, GMBN. We’ve got our own personal ones as well. – We have. – But on GMBN you can see
what we’ve been up to. You can check out the Exmoor ride that we did for that Shimano video. Come and do it yourself. Actually I like following people. – I do like it. I’m actually a newbie
to it, so I’m doing it. – Well get a following, cause
you can poach their rides and go and do some cool stuff. – You don’t have to do all
the planning, just use theirs. – If you want to the Shimano
video from yesterday, over there for that one. – Don’t forget to hit
the globe to subscribe cause you’re missing
out on some rad stuff. Give us a thumbs up like and
we see you at the next one. Neil, there’s the cars, I’m cold. – I’m cold.