How To Perform A Basic Bike Fit

How To Perform A Basic Bike Fit


– [Simon] Getting your bike well set up to
your body can make the difference between riding in comfort and riding in pain. And
for those of us chasing performance, it can be the cornerstone to
reaching your full potential. Now, it is a complex topic, more art than
science perhaps but here is our Beginner’s Guide to get you in the ballpark. Now, the first thing to get set up is your
saddle height. Now with the ball of your foot over the pedal axle and you’re
pedaling at the six o’clock position, there should be a slight bend in your leg.
Now, if you get your saddle too high, then it will cause your pelvis to rotate
as your foot’s stretching and that will cause lower back pain and saddle
discomfort. And if it’s too low, then you’ll lose power and you’ll also get
knee pain. To get the best idea of judging your saddle position, it’s a good idea to
film yourself riding on a static trainer like this, because what it does is
it means that you get a better idea of what your natural foot position is.
Some people ride with their heel down, some people ride with their toe down and
that difference can subtly alter the angle of your leg. Next, you go for the forward
and backward adjustment of your saddle and this is called the layback. Now, the
age-old technique of telling whether you’ve got the right amount of layback is
by putting your pedals level when you sat on the saddle and you drop a plumb line
from the front of your knee cap and it should drop just in front of the pedal
axle. Micro-adjustments of this position can be tailored according to whether you
use your glutes predominantly or your quads predominantly when you’re pedaling
but this is perhaps a bit more of an advance technique and we’ll cover this
later. So now we’ve tackled the seat position, it’s time to look at the reach.
Now, it’s a common misconception that you can adjust the reach to your handlebars
from your saddle by adjusting your saddle position forwards and backwards. But as
we’ve just set this up from optimum pedaling efficiency, this needs
to be left where it is. So in reality, the way you can adjust the reach is by
moving your stem up and down about two to four centimeters depending on how much
stirrer space you’ve got and then unfortunately by just buying different
length stems. So it’s a reason why it’s a great idea to go to a good bike shop where
you buy your bike in the first place, is it stops you spending money later on
to adjust your position. Fundamentally, more relaxed ride will have a
proportionally shorter reach from the handlebars to the stem and a rider looking
for a more aggressive aerodynamic position will have a longer one. However, the
limiting factor is, in reality, the flexibility in your glutes and your
hamstrings so no amount of wanting to look aerodynamic is actually going
to make it an effective position. As a general guide, though, the angle of
your back should be about 45 degrees and the angle between your arms and your back
should be about 90 degrees and this gives you the best blend of comfort,
aerodynamics, and power. When riding on the tops, you can have an even more
relaxed position so it’s good for climbing but when you’re on the drops, by bending
your arms, you can get your back close to horizontal if you can stretch
that far for aerodynamics. So to sum up, first of all, you set your
saddle height then you set the layback and then finally, leaving that in one place,
you adjust the reach of the handlebars. Now as we’ve said at the beginning, bike
set up is a complex topic so some we’re going to come back to again and again over
the coming months and if there’s something specific that you want us to tackle with
regards to bike fit or bike problems then let us know in the comment section down
below and we’ll tackle it at a later date. – [Daniel] Single Pace Line is the most
efficient way of riding if you’re facing a stiff headwind or if you’re riding with a
very small group. In this video, we’re going to show you
exactly how to do it.