How to negotiate roundabouts when cycling | Commute Smart

How to negotiate roundabouts when cycling | Commute Smart


There are many types and sizes of roundabouts
which can cause confusion amongst cyclists. What can you do to help negotiate roundabouts
with ease? Approach a roundabout the same way you would
if driving a car and take control of the appropriate lane for your intended exit. How early you should move to take control
of the lane will depend on how fast you’re going. Plus the speed and volume of traffic. Make sure you always look before changing
position in the road. Signal clearly and if your moving through
slow moving or stationary traffic follow the advice in our filtering in traffic video. Look well ahead and ideally time entering
the roundabout so you don’t have to stop. Although this isn’t always possible, you may
have to slow down. But with a cyclists all round vision and acceleration
over short distances you can anticipate the traffic flow and slot into gaps which drivers
can’t. This is perfectly acceptable if done without
causing other vehicles to have to change speed or direction. If you do have to stop before entering a roundabout
wait patiently and don’t feel pressurized by traffic behind. Give way to vehicles approaching from the
right and ones already on the roundabout and be cautious that vehicles maybe in the wrong
lane or may not signal correctly for their intended exit. Once you have entered the roundabout the idea
is to take and keep control of the appropriate lane whilst negotiating with drivers in the
other lanes by using eye contact to prepare the way for any lane changes needed for your
exit. If you are staying on the roundabout and leaving
at a later exit stay in the lane, giving your right signal to show you aren’t leaving the
roundabout yet. When your exit is approaching look over your
shoulder, use eye contact, signal your intentions and move lanes to make your exit smooth. Hold the lane until you are off the roundabout. Only moving further in if and when it’s safe
to be overtaken. For mini roundabouts the same basic principals
apply but although there is only one lane to navigate there is less time to maneuver
and less time to signal. You should be more cautious about approaching
traffic as there is less time to make decisions. Also be wary of vehicles making u-turns. Commute smart and if you have a large roundabout
on your commute try it out at a quieter time. For example earlier in the morning or on a
weekend until you are familiar with and confident enough to negotiate it correctly in busier
traffic.