How To Install Bicycle Bottle Cages | Road Bike Basics

How To Install Bicycle Bottle Cages | Road Bike Basics


(screeching treble) – If you have recently purchased,
or acquired a new bike, one of the first upgrades that
you might consider making, is to fit a bottle cage, because then you’ll be able to
ride that little bit further, in that little bit more comfort, because you won’t be dehydrated. In this video, we’re going to show you some
step-by-step guides to follow, and make it really easy to do so. (relaxing hip hop) To fit a new bottle cage to your bike you’re only going to need a few things. First off of course, a bottle cage, but then you’ll need either a three, four, or five-millimeter Allen key. As this is what’s going to actually turn the bolts there in your frame. The bolts, generally
speaking, are universal. Meaning that any bolts, from any bike, will fit any other bike, and generally speaking, the bottle cages will come
with those bolts as well. These in our case, are gold. But if it didn’t come
with any bottle cages, they’re probably already on your bike, and then finally, a little bit of grease, which I have down here,
and a cleaning cloth. Just to make sure that the
thread and everything else, is nice and clean before you
apply your new bottle cage. Actually using proper Allen keys is a lot easier than using a multi-tool when it comes to attaching
a new bottle cage. That’s because a multi-tool
can be quite bulky, being as actually quite
hard to turn inside of the bottle cage. First thing you need to do is work out what size bolts you currently have inside of your bike. I happen to know that as a 5 mil. So I’m simply going to
start unscrewing these with my 5 mil Allen key in
an anti-clockwise direction. I’m going to be careful
not to lose the washer as that’s important to go
outside of the plastic, which is what the bottle
cages are often made of. After you’ve removed the
bolts from your frame, I recommend picking up
your cleaning cloth, making sure that if it is a new bike, there are no little bits of paint that have worked their
way into the threads, or no other bits of dust or any other contaminants. You
want to make sure your threads are always nice and clean. Once you’ve done that, and you’ve rubbed the bolts, the threads on your bolts, it’s now a good time to
apply a little dab of grease on to each bolt. Once you’ve done all of that, you’re then going to want
to remove your bottle cage from whatever packaging it hase come on. Often, it’s mounted onto
a piece of cardboard with a couple of bolts and some nuts on the back. Try not to lose those because you might want them in the future. When it comes to mounting
your new bottle cage, make sure you get the correct orientation. The most intelligent person I know, who was my coach for many years, once fitted an aero-bottle
cage upside down, purely because he thought it was more aesthetically pleasing. When he turned up at the
training camp with it like that, we of course all laughed
him out of the room. And he’s never been
forgiven for it either. So make sure you get your bottle cage the correct way up. When it comes to attaching
your new bottle cage to your bike, make sure
that that little washer is on the external side of the nut. As this is what’s going to help clamp down on your bottle cage against the frame. I’d always recommend putting the bolt into the bottle cage first, and then attaching your Allen key just like that to the top bolt. And then simply and
gently, find the threads. At this point you’ll
want to be really careful not to turn the thread
with too much force, because if it’s not aligned correctly you will very easily strip it, as there is a lot of leverage
even on this small Allen key. When it comes to making
the final timing movement, you actually don’t need to
tighten your bottle cage too much, if you do have
a torque wrench at home, around 2 millimeters
is generally speaking, more than enough. There’s not a lot of
pressure on a bottle cage, so you just want to make
sure it’s not rattling and there’s no chance of
the bolt working loose. And that’s bottle cage number one, I feel that this bike
is made for adventure and it could probably
do with a second one. When it comes to fitting
your second bottle cage, you’ll notice that things
get a little bit more fiddly. And that’s because in this
small part of the triangle of the frame, there isn’t
actually that much space. And in fact, my large Allen key struggles to make a complete
turn without graving the other bottle cage. So, finger tighten this. It’s always a lot easier to undo things with your
fingers at this point. The same principles
apply when we’re fitting the second bottle cage as the first one. First, put the bolt into the bottle cage, with the washer on the external side so that it clamps down against the frame, and then introduce it to the bike and locate it with your fingers. Start turning the threads until you feel that it’s caught, again this should be nice and smooth and all the threads should’ve been checked to make sure they’re clean. Do the same with the bottom one. Now this does get a
little bit trickier here because as I mentioned before, there’s a lot less space
when it comes to fitting the second bottle cage. But with a little bit of patience, it’s not going to take you that much time. Again, depending on the size of your bolt, you may find it easy enough
to finger tighten this all the way until the
threads are right at the end, and then simply nick it
up to about 2 millimeters with the Allen key at the end. And there you have it, you should now be able to carry up to a liter and a half of water, with two 750 mil bottles on your bike. If you’ve recently
picked up your first bike and fitted some bottle cages, let us know down in the comments below. For more tuitional videos
from beginner to advanced, click just down there right now.