How To Improve Your Cornering | Common Mountain Bike Mistakes

How To Improve Your Cornering | Common Mountain Bike Mistakes


– Cornering mistakes can
really rob you of your flow but it’s also super easy to
actually fall off in corners. Whoa, Rich!
– Hiya, Neil. – New presenter. – I thought I was doing this one. – All right, I’ll leave it to you. – I got it from here, buddy, don’t worry. So, yeah, cornering, we all make mistakes. They’re all part of mountain
biking; we can’t avoid corners. But we’re going to have
a little look today at what we can do to improve them. (dramatic music) So, whether you’re a racer looking to save those milliseconds
or just a weekend warrior looking to improve your technique, today we’re going to look at
some basic types of corners and what we can do in those
corners to improve our technique and make our riding a little bit more fun. Generally, Neil, there’s no turns the same in mountain
biking, they’ve all got a bit of different variation in them. – That is true. We’re at Bike Park though;
there’s lots of berms here today. – We are and we’re going
to look, try and look at three main types of
turn that you might find. So we’re going to look
at berms, switchbacks… – Ooh the nasty switchbacks. – Yeah, and some flat turns. – Okay, right, I’ll
handle the berms, shall I? – You do that and then
let’s see how you get on. (bouncy electronic music) – Berms, the mainstay of the bike park and we’re here at Rogate Bike Park today. Loads of beautiful berms
although even with berms, no two are ever the same. Depends on their size, their
shape, how tight they are. Also, the type of dirt. Now, it’s winter in the UK, which normally means it’s
super wet but this place is really sandy so you
can see how well it drains and it’s just like sandpaper today. Just a little bit of fluffy
dirt on top, super grippy. Now one thing to think about with berms, if you can, is trying to
get nice and high into them. You’re using that camber, that’s going to give you loads of grip. If you can get nice and high
and then drop down out of it you’ve got that extra bit of momentum coming from gravity, of course. The worst thing you can do with a berm is stick your front wheel over the top, there’s no coming back from that. That’s virtually a guaranteed crash. Also, difference to a
lot of other corners , with berms, if you hit them
really hard, press into them, you actually want to keep
your feet fairly level so without dropping the outside foot. Stay up on two feet, just lower your body, try and find all the grip in that berm. (bouncy electronic music)
– Cool, thanks for that Neil. That’s some good tips there on berms. But now we’re going to
move onto flat turns. And they are a favorite of
mine, you find them all the time back in old school world
cups and we’re here and we’re going to look at some. So we’ve got a nice classic flat turn where we’re going to set
up high, above these trees, taking a wide line, come
behind me, onto this flat area, where we’re then going to
sprint out, down the trail. There’s a few tips and tricks to look at on this one, so let’s take a look. Alright, so what are common mistakes made in these flat turns? Well let’s break it down
and look at this one first. Our entrance, we got a
couple of slippy routes, so we’re going to have to
really think about how we set up to enter this turn. We’re going to hop these to
then bring us up nice and high. Couple of mistakes that
people will make here is they’ll be dropping down too low, it’ll put them at an
awkward angle into the turn and really sort of make things difficult from the very beginning. So we’ve had a look at the mistakes at the beginning of the turn, now let’s take a look at
the middle part of the turn. Here, we’ve kind of got two
sides of this stump behind me that we can go, so we really
want to either try and go very high or straight
through the middle here. Personally, I would say the
middle is a better line, as I think too high is
harder to come up onto. The middle line will also
give us nice arc in the turn and carry us some nice speed through. Okay, so this is it, the
final part of our turn and the flattest part. We’ve already decided,
we’re going to set up nice and wide out here on the far right but what kind
of mistakes do people make when hitting these turns? Now often you’ll see people with their pedals in the wrong position, their body weight will
be unevenly distributed. And also braking, poor
braking can massively effect the amount of grip you
have on these turns, Especially on something a bit slicker. So let’s take a quick look at what you can do to improve that. Let’s start with body position. Keeping yourself low in the turn is key as grip can be a lot less
in this kind of turn. Keeping our center of
gravity as low as possible will help you keep all the grip you can. Outside pedal should also
be dropped to support this and keep yourself planted,
with as much weight as possible forced down through the
suspension and into the tires. (upbeat pop music) Right so finally we’ve got
a switchback or switchbacks. Now these are generally a
series or singular tight turns where you’re going to change
direction really quickly. Again, like with a lot of other turns, line choice is really key. As you can see here, this
is quite a tight turn. We’ve got an inside line and we’ve also got a nice high line which I’m going to have a
go at and we’ll see if Neil can have a go at this lower line and see what the differences is, is is is. – I like Rich’s line but
what I’m going to try and do is stick to this sort of rut. It’s kind of bermed up
anyway on the inside and that root is going to be pretty slick. It’s a little bit wet,
so what I’m trying to do is rail round the outside. The big difference here
will be how much speed can I carry on the outside? ‘Cause that’s another big
mistake with switchback corners is sort of stuttering
and losing your flow. You want to carry your
momentum all the way round and I can really mess that
up by going wide here. So will it be as fast as Rich’s? There’s only one way to find out. (gravel crunches) (upbeat pop music) – [Rich Voiceover] Same as any corner, try and come off the brakes. This is especially important
with really tight switchbacks, where if you touch the brake mid-corner, it’s super easy to lose your balance. (brakes squeal) (upbeat pop music) – Right Neil, so what have learnt today? Well there’s a lot of different corners and looking at each one and assessing it you can really ride each one differently. – Absolutely; my biggest mistake is always forgetting to look round corners. I know I say it all the time,
but if I don’t ride very often I realize that’s what
messing me up all the time. Er, Rich, your first ever GMRV. You didn’t fall off like Doddy. (shouting) – I didn’t, no, I’ve stayed
rubber-side down the whole time! – So far, so good. It’ll happen, it’ll happen! (laughing) It you want to see some
more skills videos, down there’s how to ride berms, up there for flat corners. – Yep and don’t forget
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