How To Get The Perfect MTB Set Up | Mountain Bike Tips

How To Get The Perfect MTB Set Up | Mountain Bike Tips


– Getting the correct bike for you and then getting it set
up as well as possible is gonna make that bike
much more comfortable, more fun, more
confidence-inspiring, and also fast. So here are a few tips on
getting the perfect bike setup. Step number one of getting
the perfect bike setup is actually getting the correct bike. So there’s all sorts of
different mountain bikes on the market at the moment. Different wheel sizes,
different travel if you’ve got a full-suspension bike,
even different tyre sizes. So if you’re just new to this, I would definitely speak
to a local bike shop or take a look at the
manufacturer’s websites. You can get an awful lot
of information from there and also check out
things like the geometry, and the full specs of the bike
and it’s going to tell you what that bike is good for. This is my Strive. This is a 160 mil travel,
full-suspension bike, it’s really an Enduro
bike, 27.5 inch wheels. I’m going to talk you through
how I set this bike up and how you can use
this to tailor your bike to fit you and make it
work perfectly for you. So you’ve got the correct bike for you. The first thing I’ll now
do is set up my pressures, so suspension and air
pressures and also tyres. If you’ve got a full suspension bike, I would start with the rear shock and I always go for 30% SAG on there. We’ve done a full video on
that so check that one out if you haven’t done already. But we always get it there
first and then ride the bike. You can always play around with things like the air volume
spaces inside the shock if you still feel like
it’s a little bit too soft. Same with the fork, I like
to try and set the SAG at about 20 to 25% and then play around with volume spaces if I
want to make that fork maybe more progressive. On to the tyres, So personally I go for
about 28 to 30 in the rear and about 28 to 26 in the front. You can go a little bit softer in front because most of your weight
is over that rear tyre and that’s where you get
all this big impacts. Again, if happen to go
much higher than that because you’re puncturing all the time, I’d then think about
getting a tougher tyre. So maybe going up to a dual
ply tyre or a dyno tyre. Actually picking that tyre
for the bike also makes a big difference to how
that bike will ride. So and Enduro bike like this, you’re probably more likely
to see single ply tyres but with a slightly tougher
casing like a protection casing. I have a fairly big tread but I’ve actually got these
dual ply Kaiser Downhill tyres on this bike because I want
to actually tweak the setup to make this bike feel a little
more like a downhill bike. So now looking at bar
height and bar width, let’s start with width. I’ve run 760 mm bars
on every bike of mine except for cross country bikes,
where it’s slightly shorter. That just suites me. It’s just down to personal
preference really. I find I do like wide bars but any wider, and I start hittin’ my hands
on trees and things like that. So that’s like perfect for me. Bar height makes a massive difference to how your bike rides. You basically want to get
your bike balanced out. So, this bike I do like to ride downhill, like I’ve already mentioned so I’ve actually got a few
spacers underneath that stem so I’ve got a relatively high bar. Great for going downhill
because it keeps your weight a little bit further back on the bike. Not so good for steep climbs, to where I’m actually having to get more weight onto the bars but that’s the compromise
for me and it works fine. I’m running a 40 mil stem on here. So, we got it nice and short, makes our bike really aggressive and good for going down hills. If you wanted it’s climb
a little bit better, again I could probably put
like a 60, 80 mil stem on that and just get a bit more
weight further forward. Getting the brake levers
in the corrects spot is gonna make a big difference
to how well you can use them and therefore stop obviously. So, one of the biggest
considerations is actually the angle on the actual handlebar. So, again I ride a little
bit more downhill style on this bike so I actually
like them relatively high so quite flat on the bar. So when I’m over the back
of the bike braking hard, I get to them nicely. Also, one finger braking
is very important. If you’ve got these brakes you should be using just one finger cause you need all those
other fingers and thumb really grasping onto the bar. When it comes to brake rotor size, the bigger they are, the better
your braking is gonna be. They’re more suited to downhill. They’re gonna dissipate
heat slightly better so, they’re not gonna phase. On the front of my bike
I’ve got a 200 mil rotor, so pretty much as big as you can get. Again, the payoff for that is weight but it’s gonna be really good performance. And on the rear I’ve got a 180. Next options, you’ve got gearing so, different size chain ring and obviously you can go one or two by, I’m runnin a one by. It just suites the
Enduro bike much better. I’ve got a 1X11 and 11 46 out on the rear so a big spread and nice match
to a 34 tooth chain ring, which is probably about average. Let’s say your maybe a really fit rider, you could probably go
out to a 36 on there. But down to 32 is going to
suite you a little bit better if you do more climbing. With the pedals, you’ve got the two
different options of style, either flat or clipped, depending
on what you like to ride. I ride clips most of the time. Then you’ve got different options as well. These are the Crank Brothers
Mallet E so Enduro pedals. They’re sort of mid-sized. You have got cage on there. You can go bigger than
that with the Mallet DH, obviously payoff is weight or you can go lighter with
a cross country pedal. You don’t have that support
around that clip system in the middle. The saddle choice is
really all about comfort and getting the correct saddle height is really important for getting
the most efficient peddling. I would say a dropper post is
great for almost every bike other than the lightest
weight cross country bike, or a dyno bike where
you just don’t need one. So, if you don’t have one, I would definitely
recommend it as an upgrade. So when it comes to getting
the perfect bike setup, for me there are some
things that will stay almost exactly the same between my bikes and that is the bar width,
the angle of the brake levers, all my cockpit set up will
be almost exactly the same between my bikes. And obviously then, it’s
like picking the frame. So this bike is very good for Enduro. And then, I can tweak the
bike by changing things like the tyres and the wheels to really make a big difference
to how that bike rides. So therefore tweak it one way or the other to really make that bike
suite the exact type of riding that I do. So that is a few tips on how
to get the perfect bike setup. For me, I’ll always take
a multi-tool on the trail, especially if it’s a new
bike and I’ve just it up, so that I can still tweak
those things like brake levers if they don’t feel quite
right the first time. If you wanna se some more in
depth videos on bike set up click over there for How
to Set Up Your Suspension and just down here for
Tyre Pressures Explained. Click on GMBN logo to subscribe if you haven’t done it already. Give us a thumbs up if you
found this video useful.