How to Fix a Broken Chain – On-Trail Mountain Bike Repairs | Part 3

How to Fix a Broken Chain – On-Trail Mountain Bike Repairs | Part 3


A broken chain can be a real bummer, but you shouldn’t let it wreck your day. Before you leave on your next ride make sure you have a master-link or quick-link specific to your chain and a chain tool in your pack. Its easiest to repair a broken chain with your bike laying down on the non-drive-side. Collect your chain from the trail if it came all the way out. Look for damage on both ends of the break, and remove the broken links using your chain tool. You’ll need a male link on both ends of the break to be able to install your new quick-link or master-link. Once you’ve removed the damaged links… you can re-thread your chain around the chain rings and through your derailleurs. If you haven’t fixed a ton of chains, it helps to look at your riding partner’s chain or a photo to make sure that you route it properly. It will be easiest if your bike is in the smallest chain rings both front and back. Install your new quick- or master-link in the chain. Once installed, slowly backpedal until the master-link is on the top side of your chainstay. Give the pedals a quick and hard push forward to lock the link. Shift your bike through all the gears. Your chain is shorter now, so you likely won’t be able to use some of your gears. It’s good to know what limitations you have for the rest of your ride so you won’t break your chain again. If fixing your chain did not affect your gear range or shifting performance, you’re good to go. If it did, it’s time to head down the mountain to your local bike shop and have them evaluate whether your newly shortened chain can be made to work… or if it’s best to buy a new chain. If you have questions, or would like a demonstration of how to fix a broken chain… call our Experts at 435-649-4949 or swing into the Jans Park Avenue Bike Shop.